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Old Yesterday, 09:06 AM
 
5,609 posts, read 2,952,069 times
Reputation: 10575

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Oh, by the time the macerator gets through with it you can't even tell it's poop, except for the color. Once I put the hose down the drain and start the pump, I don't get close enough to smell it.

We never use tp. Baby wipes and they're sealed in a ziploc bag and tossed in the trash.

There are much worse things that can go wrong, like your tanks freezing when it drops below 32 degrees for a prolonged period. Although the really fancy RVs probably have heated tanks.
Strange, someone showed me how to do it. The stuff stinks even if it doesn’t look like untouched poop. And why do so many RVs stink so badly of sewage when hooked up? Sometimes I see leaks around them, too.

I know someone with an RV who never, ever uses the bathroom in it. He doesn’t want to clean out the sewage. So much for being self-contained...
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Old Yesterday, 09:12 AM
 
5,609 posts, read 2,952,069 times
Reputation: 10575
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
This is not the van or RV life anyone would choose. This is what happens for those who are at bottom and cannot get by. After the 2008 recession quite a few people lost their jobs and their houses and could not even pay rent. While traveling I met quite a few people living in vans or cars. Some of the stories were just heart wrenching. Most of these people were looking for work. Some had families elsewhere they were trying to support. This was more common then than now.

Your lack of concern, your attitude and your lack of sympathy are just plain disgusting!!!
How do you know some of the derelicts did not choose to “van camp” forever?

It is easy to feel sympathy for people thrown unexpectedly into homelessness.

Not so for those choosing to live cheap longterm using borderline or illegal tactics. They are like the young bums who travel by panhandling and misusing the kindness of the places they visit—all done purposely.

Last edited by pikabike; Yesterday at 09:36 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 09:34 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,116 posts, read 19,112,820 times
Reputation: 34250
It's not dirty or disgusting. I wasn't aware that there were people actually forced to live in vans. That's not what I was thinking about. A decent car and a camper that you pull behind it.

There's nothing dirty or moldy about it. Cute little bathroom with curtains. It's sort of like renting a cabin or cottage except you can take it with you. You can get a/c for it. You sleep in it and often you cook in it. It has a stove and dorm sized fridge.

This is the lifestyle for those who love the outdoors and enjoy nature. Toasting marshmallows over the campfire, meeting people from all over the country or keeping to yourself...your choice. Feeling really free.

Most campgrounds allow pets. We always took doggie. If your car breaks down, get it fixed. That's why I prefer the car/camper combo, not a self contained unit.

Although if your vehicle seriously broke down, go stay in a motel for a night or two. It helps if you have a little bit of serendipity and are open to new possibilities. You need to think and problem solve. That's part of being free. I think it's good for people.

But maybe there aren't as many people anymore who like to be free and spontaneous, who love the outdoors and nature, the peace and quiet. People don't appreciate paddling a canoe on a lake and hearing the call of loons (the bird version, lol).

It's like simplifying your life down to basics. You find out who you are and what's important to you. Most of us don't need the stuff we're surrounded with--if I'm camping I live without my precious antiques and paintings, my dishwasher, my big tv (if I even want a big tv). Camping is so basic that you might spend a morning taking pictures of butterflies or eating blueberry pancakes from berries you picked the day before. You might choose to eat at your picnic table or at the little fold down table in your camper. Use paper plates or get a set of Corelle. Drink your coffee and relax while you read online or a book...look around at the trees and watch a bird or a chipmunk if you want to. Nothing is scheduled, you are free. Get in the car and take an excursion to a local attraction, it could be a water park, a lighthouse, a place to indulge in the local grub, whether it is lobsters, BBQ, Mexican, clam chowder, etc. It's all fun you learn to roll with the punches, take what comes, and occasionally make lemonade when you get lemons.

It's the opposite of working. You're doing as you please and when you please. You're fending for yourself and after all these years of working, it's a good way to rediscover who you really are.
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Last edited by in_newengland; Yesterday at 10:13 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 09:40 AM
 
12,199 posts, read 5,286,948 times
Reputation: 19692
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
It's not dirty or disgusting. I wasn't aware that there were people actually forced to live in vans. That's not what I was thinking about. A decent car and a camper that you pull behind it.

There's nothing dirty or moldy about it. Cute little bathroom with curtains. It's sort of like renting a cabin or cottage except you can take it with you. You can get a/c for it. You sleep in it and often you cook in it. It has a stove and dorm sized fridge.

This is the lifestyle for those who love the outdoors and enjoy nature. Toasting marshmallows over the campfire, meeting people from all over the country or keeping to yourself...your choice. Feeling really free.

Most campgrounds allow pets. We always took doggie. Of your car breaks down, get it fixed. That's why I prefer the car/camper combo, not a self contained unit.

Although if your vehicle seriously broke down, go stay in a motel for a night or two. It helps if you have a little bit of serendipity and are open to new possibilities. You need to think and problem solve. That's part of being free. I think it's good for people.

But maybe there aren't as many people anymore who like to be free and spontaneous, who love the outdoors and nature, the peace and quiet. People don't appreciate paddling a canoe on a lake and hearing the call of loons (the bird version, lol).

It's like simplifying your life down to basics. You find out who you are and what's important to you. Most of us don't need the stuff we're surrounded with--if I'm camping I live without my precious antiques and paintings, my dishwasher, my big tv (if I even want a big tv). Camping is so basic that you might spend a morning taking pictures of butterflies or eating blueberry pancakes from berries you picked the day before. You might choose to eat at your picnic table or at the little fold down table in your camper. Use paper plates or get a set of Corelle. Drink your coffee and relax while you read online or a book...look around at the trees and watch a bird or a chipmunk if you want to. Nothing is scheduled, you are free. Get in the car and take an excursion to a local attraction, it could be a water park, a lighthouse, a place to indulge in the local grub, whether it is lobsters, BBQ, Mexican, clam chowder, etc. It's all fun you learn to roll with the punches, take what comes, and occasionally make lemonade when you get lemons.

It's the opposite of working. You're doing as you please and when you please. You're fending for yourself and after all these years of working, it's a good way to rediscover who you really are.
Much of this can also be had by living in a small town out in the country somewhere with a little bit of land. There's no need to do it from a van. Find the right location and you can still be close enough to enjoy many restaurants and attractions within easy driving distance.
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Old Yesterday, 09:46 AM
 
5,609 posts, read 2,952,069 times
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There is a big difference between camping and living put of a vehicle. People who don’t live out of vehicles can still love outdoor activities. All that “free and spontaneous” stuff is just as easily done by tent camping either at a car campground or (*gasp*) by backpacking or other self-powered travel.

The OP was asking about living out of a van, which is not camping. It is using a car as a house.
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Old Yesterday, 09:48 AM
 
6,434 posts, read 4,837,916 times
Reputation: 13375
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
How do you know some of the derelicts did not choose to “van camp” forever?

It is easy to feel sympathy for people thrown unexpectedly into homelessness.

Not so for those choosing to live cheap longterm using borderline or illegal tactics.
I have no idea what you mean by borderline or illegal tactics. I guess you must be referring to all of the people with great careers and plenty of money who have decided to van camp where you don't want to see them.

At one time there were lots of "vagrancy" laws. The Supreme Court found them illegal. No one is required to own a house or to pay rent. If someone owns a vehicle and has a current license and registration they can park the same places you can.
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Old Yesterday, 09:52 AM
 
6,434 posts, read 4,837,916 times
Reputation: 13375
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
There is a big difference between camping and living put of a vehicle. People who don’t live out of vehicles can still love outdoor activities. All that “free and spontaneous” stuff is just as easily done by tent camping either at a car campground or (*gasp*) by backpacking or other self-powered travel.

The OP was asking about living out of a van, which is not camping. It is using a car as a house.
What is the big difference? Why do people who live in vans need to switch to living in a tent or backpack?

What does living in a van or a house have to do with outdoor activities?
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Old Yesterday, 10:19 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,116 posts, read 19,112,820 times
Reputation: 34250
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
There is a big difference between camping and living put of a vehicle. People who don’t live out of vehicles can still love outdoor activities. All that “free and spontaneous” stuff is just as easily done by tent camping either at a car campground or (*gasp*) by backpacking or other self-powered travel.

The OP was asking about living out of a van, which is not camping. It is using a car as a house.
I couldn't see living in a van and staying in one place. If I had to live in a van it would be for the purpose the OP originally stated: to travel. And, of course, I prefer a little trailer or popup camper because I can leave it and take the car to go where I want to. Come back to the camper/trailer at night to eat and sleep.

And, a purpose made camper gets you closer to nature than a closed in van. A camper has big windows that open to reveal screens so you get fresh and and cool night air for sleeping, the sounds of the woods, and so on
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my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
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Old Yesterday, 10:33 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,116 posts, read 19,112,820 times
Reputation: 34250
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Much of this can also be had by living in a small town out in the country somewhere with a little bit of land. There's no need to do it from a van. Find the right location and you can still be close enough to enjoy many restaurants and attractions within easy driving distance.
Of course, but the OP wanted to travel and see the country. You need some sort of transportation to do that and you could use a van or a popup camper, a tent, or a small trailer--all with a car except the van. And I would feel claustrophobic in a van. Vans aren't made to live in and even if they're customized, I don't think I could stand it. But the customized van in the video a few pages back wasn't too bad. Too cramped for me though, but they are very young and that's probably why they can put up with so much. Even my little popup camper had more space than that thing--two double beds, for one thing--and the table folded down-easy, the full length mirror was on the back of the door, and I kept a dust pan and brush handy by the door. Everything was handy and easy--probably easier and more convenient than an apartment or a house. I always used a doormat outside so the inside stayed pretty clean.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
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Old Yesterday, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
8,109 posts, read 4,961,733 times
Reputation: 29628
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
I know someone with an RV who never, ever uses the bathroom in it. He doesn’t want to clean out the sewage.
I take it you've never changed a baby's diapers.

Not using the marine toilet? That's a choice.

It's often a choice that's reconsidered late at night when it's raining hard and it's a 100 yard sprint to the nearest public lavatory.
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