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Old 08-25-2019, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Central IL
15,318 posts, read 8,735,400 times
Reputation: 35963

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lottamoxie View Post
Through my job I had an optional benefit for legal coverage for $20/month. I opted in for 1 benefit year so I could take care of my simple estate planning. I met with a local law firm and got a Will, PoA, Living Will (aka Healthcare Directive), Healthcare PoA. I could have utilized other legal products but I didn't need anything else. Total Cost for the year: $240
Wow - that's a really nice benefit - I may have to check to see if I have that available through my work.
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Old 08-25-2019, 04:10 PM
 
459 posts, read 175,779 times
Reputation: 1546
To all who have wills, trusts, POA's, living wills, etc: make sure you have a trusted person holding those, not just buried in your papers at home, especially if you are single. We chose the lawyer that wrote them.

In case of imminent death someone needs to state your wishes about prolonging your life and they may need that paper to prove it. One of us could call the attorney and ask for a copy of the other's living will instead of trying to find it in a stressful situation.

After death someone needs to know where to find your will.
In our case we had all those papers written/signed and wrote a letter to our executors (a brother each) and told them how to contact the attorney who had our wills/trust. That way we can make any changes we want at any time that remain private until we're gone.

We also don't have to worry that someone unauthorized could find our wills and destroy them or rewrite them in their favor, even though that's unlikely. And we don't have to burden our executors with keeping our wills in a safe place, all they need is the phone number to call.

My grandmother told me and siblings what was in her will and the name of the attorney who wrote it. It was very helpful in carrying out her wishes which were set up to protect her son from spending everything and being poor in old age. It worked extremely well but if I didn't have that information it would have failed.
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Old 08-25-2019, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Rust'n in Tustin
2,423 posts, read 2,505,782 times
Reputation: 4604
People keeping their will secret crack me up. Our kids both have copies of the will, and know exactly what they're getting, as well as the grandkids.

It's no big secret.

I was going to leave a motorcycle to my friend Tony when I died, then I just called him up and told him to come and get it. He was happy, and I had more space in my garage.

Win/win
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Old 08-26-2019, 10:24 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,933 posts, read 3,835,774 times
Reputation: 13063
Quote:
Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
People keeping their will secret crack me up. Our kids both have copies of the will, and know exactly what they're getting, as well as the grandkids.
I think that making out a will years ago and not maintaining it and keeping it current might be worse than not having one. Mine needs some work but I keep putting it off. My trust needs updating as well. This thread reminded me to get it out and review it.
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Old 08-26-2019, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Rust'n in Tustin
2,423 posts, read 2,505,782 times
Reputation: 4604
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
. This thread reminded me to get it out and review it.
Now we're getting somewhere. Your kids will thank you.

The loss of a parent can be a very difficult time (I'm told). Make it easy on your kids, grandkids, heirs by getting your affairs in order.
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Old 08-27-2019, 11:34 AM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,305 posts, read 2,921,691 times
Reputation: 5082
We review ours yearly for additions or subtractions to the trust we may have forgotten.

You might want to revisit if there have been deaths or births you want to acknowledge.
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Old 08-27-2019, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Kountze, Texas
283 posts, read 43,129 times
Reputation: 243
We have an appointment tomorrow afternoon with an attorney to discuss will/trust.
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Old 08-27-2019, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
57,153 posts, read 55,408,623 times
Reputation: 68013
Quote:
Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
People keeping their will secret crack me up. Our kids both have copies of the will, and know exactly what they're getting, as well as the grandkids.

It's no big secret.

I was going to leave a motorcycle to my friend Tony when I died, then I just called him up and told him to come and get it. He was happy, and I had more space in my garage.

Win/win
I saw my mother's will when she was getting a quad bypass four years ago and I had to go dig out her advance directive/living will.

I'm one of seven kids, six of whom are still living. There's a seven-way split of the assets, which is mostly her house, and it's divided by the six kids and the seventh share is split between the five grandkids. Of course, if my mother needs that house to pay for healthcare/a nursing home, that's where it will go, and we will all be left with nothing, which is just fine and dandy.
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Old 08-27-2019, 12:52 PM
 
3,395 posts, read 3,111,202 times
Reputation: 4944
Quote:
Before your death, ensure your real property is modest.
Huh!? Why in the h**l would I want to do this?
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Old 08-27-2019, 03:20 PM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,713 posts, read 3,100,837 times
Reputation: 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
Why are people so hesitant to get a will/trust? I'm guessing most people without a will don't have a medical directive, or power of attorney either?

You guys/girls know we're all going to die at some time, right? Not cleaning up your mess before you go isn't going to stop it.

Here's a better question, how many of you have long-term care? We may not die, y'know, we may just be incapacitated.

For myself, this has more to do with money and the fact that I don't really have assets. Trust me, no one wants my collection of fur, haha! However, when I was single and living in CA, I had a holographic will basically letting my mom know where I wanted everything to go. OR doesn't allow that, so it's online forms and money or attorney and money.
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