U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Today, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,520 posts, read 5,183,894 times
Reputation: 3588

Advertisements

I took an early retirement. At first when people asked me what I do I told them I am a retired teacher. Many assumed I have a huge pension and free healthcare for life neither of which is true. I now just tell people I'm self-employed and I don't have to defend myself against hot-button misconceptions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Today, 07:13 AM
 
6,437 posts, read 4,841,776 times
Reputation: 13386
"Work is the main source of a meaningful existence for most people......"

Huh? That does not pertain to the vast majority of people on this forum or others I have met. It did not pertain when they worked and certainly not in retirement. This might be how highly accomplished people look at the world but it is not a mainstream opinion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:46 AM
 
Location: The South
5,348 posts, read 3,705,057 times
Reputation: 8129
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimAZ View Post
I smiled when the article mentions how academics have more difficulty dealing with retirement. We live in a 55+ community that was founded by a group of distinguished academics 20 years ago. Their Utopian fantasies failed spectacularly and resulted in two bankruptcies and a community that was moribund for over a decade.

In 2016 a new developer turned things around, refunded the HOA, and has things back on track, but, the “old guard” of academics still clings to the failed past. Their emails (often from distant .edu servers) are signed with full academic titles and credentials. After all, how can we assign side dishes for a pot-luck social without the help of a Nobel laureate?
Yep, we got of those in our neighborhood, he is member of the POA and occasionally sends out emails, which are signed with “name Phd”.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:56 AM
 
7,924 posts, read 4,479,104 times
Reputation: 11785
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
"Work is the main source of a meaningful existence for most people......"

Huh? That does not pertain to the vast majority of people on this forum or others I have met. It did not pertain when they worked and certainly not in retirement. This might be how highly accomplished people look at the world but it is not a mainstream opinion.
I personally believe we all need a "raison d'etre." A reason to live. Whether that be a vocation, avocation, cause, passionate hobby, devoted love, sense of dedication to something or something, whatever. Our life has to have purpose and feel meaningful, or it becomes an existential hell. It's why so many today are so unhappy (look at antidepressant use).

Work at least gives us the illusion, if nothing else, that we're needed somewhere and are accomplishing something. A lot of people need that structure, and I think a lot of people suffer from the loss of it when they retire. Frankly, the constant "Retirement is amazing!" refrain gets old to me and is not convincing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 09:48 AM
 
2,506 posts, read 646,922 times
Reputation: 4351
I'm of the opinion that you never retire. You just change what you do.

You take the same skills you've learned over a lifetime in business and apply them to your personal life. You have objectives. You have strategies. You have tactics. You have deliverables and tasks.

That is, you make plans, then you execute your plans. You don't just sit on your duff watching reruns of Wheel of Fortune.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 10:00 AM
 
14,324 posts, read 7,646,510 times
Reputation: 26171
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
I'm of the opinion that you never retire. You just change what you do.

You take the same skills you've learned over a lifetime in business and apply them to your personal life. You have objectives. You have strategies. You have tactics. You have deliverables and tasks.

That is, you make plans, then you execute your plans. You don't just sit on your duff watching reruns of Wheel of Fortune.



My plan is to watch reruns of Wheel of Fortune.


I spent most of my career in high pressure metro Boston tech startups as the senior technical guy. I then spent a decade with more telecommuting lifestyle jobs that had their pressure moments but nothing like the first 25+ years of my career. At 61, I simply don't have it in me. I don't have the energy level. I don't have the passion. I'm nowhere near as sharp as I used to be.


Though at some level, you're right. We do a couple of Europe vacations every year. I research, plan, and project manage those the way I've always worked. It's just nothing like the work load or stress level of what I did professionally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 10:35 AM
 
1,792 posts, read 652,004 times
Reputation: 1907
An occupation (or a former occupation from which a person has retired) is something that probably offers most information about what this person might be like - so, it is useful as an introduction. I find it normal that people say they are a "retired X" (where X is the occupation from which the person has retired). It says much more about a person than just "retired". It does not mean at all that the retired person misses his/her former occupation, or does not know what to do without it, or has no identity outside of it. It is simply a quick summary of a history that generally greatly influences who the person is at present. If you don't say up front what you used to do, people will often ask anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 10:39 AM
 
356 posts, read 96,546 times
Reputation: 931
I have never lied or have been embarrassed in telling people I'm retired.

Nor do I feel guilt or regret about having to center my existence or a sense of fulfillment around a job working long hours for someone else.

I now engage in exactly the activities I want to, when I want, and on the terms I dictate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 10:53 AM
 
514 posts, read 104,999 times
Reputation: 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
I took an early retirement. At first when people asked me what I do I told them I am a retired teacher. Many assumed I have a huge pension and free healthcare for life neither of which is true. I now just tell people I'm self-employed and I don't have to defend myself against hot-button misconceptions.
That's a good point. There's a huge difference in the pension situation depending on circumstances.

To show the other extreme, a friend of mine's brother is a retired fire captain of some sort. His pension? $17k / month. OTOH, some retired fireman in Kansas would probably get a small fraction of that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 12:03 PM
 
Location: SoCal
6,086 posts, read 9,602,592 times
Reputation: 5868
Quote:
Originally Posted by kavm View Post
An interesting piece from BBC News... Catchy title aside - it touches on interesting facets of retirement and identity and includes quotes from a HBS professor and a couple of Noble laureates.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-48882195
I didn't read very far into this article. I don't call that a "catchy" title - more a misleading one.

None of the people we hang around with - nor we - "lie about being retired". And the opening part of this article doesn't explain why the author would suggest such a thing.

Not up to the usual BBC journalistic standards.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top