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Old 08-22-2019, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,937 posts, read 5,060,585 times
Reputation: 17608

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https://www.bbc.com/news/business-49075955

""I only work two days a week, and I wanted to do something after I retired and it was just a no-brainer to stay. It's not about the money. I enjoy the work," he says.

Mr Klug still turns out high precision parts at Alexandria, and also fills in on other jobs at the company when necessary. But a key role is to pass on his skills to a new generation of staff at the company. It's a trade-off that suits both sides. Mr Klug gets to stay active; Alexandria Industries gets valuable training for new workers."

"But it's not just the skills shortage that has extended the job prospects for ageing workers. Some employers seem to prefer them.

At Johnson & Sons, a florist in Saint Paul, Minnesota, Tom Johnson employs people ranging from ages 16 to 86.

He has nothing but praise for the older workers, even running job adverts targeted at the baby boomer generation. For a start, Mr Johnson says, older employees are more reliable.

"They don't have kids to take care of or hectic social lives," he says. And his elderly new recruits bring with them valuable experience from other fields."


I too work part time in retirement teaching skills to the young generation. I enjoy it immensely.

How about you?
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:09 AM
 
Location: USA
18,863 posts, read 9,218,717 times
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Older workers have a few advantages over many younger workers.

- They don't LIVE ON THEIR PHONES.

- They have a good work ethic, and are reliable.

- They don't say "LIKE" every other word.

- They have interpersonal skills and don't need to communicate only through technology.

- They have skills and experience that younger people don't have the PATIENCE to learn.
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:37 AM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,181 posts, read 12,489,943 times
Reputation: 14153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
Older workers have a few advantages over many younger workers.

- They don't LIVE ON THEIR PHONES.

- They have a good work ethic, and are reliable.

- They don't say "LIKE" every other word.

- They have interpersonal skills and don't need to communicate only through technology.

- They have skills and experience that younger people don't have the PATIENCE to learn.
And for those over 65 they don't need medical insurance saving thousands.
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:49 AM
 
72,955 posts, read 72,772,553 times
Reputation: 50470
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicet4 View Post
And for those over 65 they don't need medical insurance saving thousands.
Not true ..many keep their work insurance as long as it is credited insurance ....it can serve as primary or a supplement along with Medicare part A ...that way they don’t have to have part B
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Old 08-22-2019, 08:09 AM
 
14,355 posts, read 24,179,143 times
Reputation: 20347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
Older workers have a few advantages over many younger workers.

- They don't LIVE ON THEIR PHONES.

- They have a good work ethic, and are reliable.

- They don't say "LIKE" every other word.

- They have interpersonal skills and don't need to communicate only through technology.

- They have skills and experience that younger people don't have the PATIENCE to learn.


They also have basic mathematics skill.

Also, there are a number of tooling jobs for which no young people have been trained. I know a few people who have those skills who are selling their skills to the highest bidder. One of my former employees started working as an independent contractor at 3x his old rate.
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Old 08-22-2019, 08:47 AM
Status: "Life is good!" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Kronenwetter Wisconsin
315 posts, read 152,308 times
Reputation: 700
And they know how to read a clock to tell time. I swear that drives me crazy when I say 12:45 and they can't figure it out. I worked in a daycare and I would say the 'baby need to be fed in an hour and 15 minutes or 12:45. Nope couldn't understand taht.

We are interviewing right now. Fresh out of college applicant. References are called... personal life interferes with work life. This is the second or third young applicant that the reference said that. I have my cell phone at work but rarely look at it during the day.

They were hoping some older applicants (like me) would apply but it didn't happen. They will not hire until they find the right candidate.
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Old 08-22-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Florida -
8,839 posts, read 10,979,633 times
Reputation: 16958
Why US firms are desperate to retain ageing workers?
This is a broadly generalized editorial with mostly anecdotal evidence and little or no substantive proof.

The desire of companies to hang onto older, experienced employees ... depends on the economy. In a robust economy, like today's, the employment picture is great for older AND younger employees. But, in a recessionary environment , the opposite is true. Try, for example, to tell the aging workforce of 2007-2010 how 'desperate' US firms were to retain aging workers.
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Old 08-22-2019, 09:18 AM
 
549 posts, read 327,794 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
Why US firms are desperate to retain ageing workers?
This is a broadly generalized editorial with mostly anecdotal evidence and little or no substantive proof.

The desire of companies to hang onto older, experienced employees ... depends on the economy. In a robust economy, like today's, the employment picture is great for older AND younger employees. But, in a recessionary environment , the opposite is true. Try, for example, to tell the aging workforce of 2007-2010 how 'desperate' US firms were to retain aging workers.
Not only that but all the disparaging things that have been said about young people here every single one of them was constantly bleated, whined, and bemoaned from employers (and others) about young people 40-45 yrs ago when I was young. (And probably most here since this is the "retirement" board. I'm sure it tends to skew OLD) Well, all except the one about being on their phones all the time. Like, if we had had phones then we'd have forgotten about them at work and just worked like it was a religion because that's what The Boss wanted. Nope. No phone usage for us. HA! BS. That's only a problem now because the employers are generally old and the workers in question are generally young. (Guess-Who can't deal with change?) In a few yrs it will be commonplace and nobody will mention it. Or the fad will peter out?

Jobs for which no young people are trained? Hey, why not invest in your work force? God forbid an employer train people. That might cost money! Best just to complain about "Them" and their phones and their "like".....
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Old 08-22-2019, 11:40 AM
 
1,162 posts, read 358,440 times
Reputation: 2537
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
Why US firms are desperate to retain ageing workers?
This is a broadly generalized editorial with mostly anecdotal evidence and little or no substantive proof.

The desire of companies to hang onto older, experienced employees ... depends on the economy. In a robust economy, like today's, the employment picture is great for older AND younger employees. But, in a recessionary environment , the opposite is true. Try, for example, to tell the aging workforce of 2007-2010 how 'desperate' US firms were to retain aging workers.
Yeah, 'desperate' US firms who fired older workers and then farm their jobs overseas and/or import H1B visa workers.

Cheaper labor costs = higher profits = higher stock prices = happy investors.
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Old 08-22-2019, 01:03 PM
 
1,659 posts, read 332,389 times
Reputation: 1904
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Yeah, 'desperate' US firms who fired older workers and then farm their jobs overseas and/or import H1B visa workers.

Cheaper labor costs = higher profits = higher stock prices = happy investors.
But not necessarily "happy customers". And that is when mgmt gets on the phone to retired workers asking them if they want to come back.
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