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View Poll Results: What is the best car for senior drivers?
Sedan 18 23.08%
SUV/Crossover 60 76.92%
Voters: 78. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-28-2019, 09:50 PM
 
6,511 posts, read 5,210,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LFJourney View Post
Iím a 60-year old female and looking for a new 2019 or 2020 car. I know that everyone says not to buy new, but thatís what I want since I hope to keep my next car at least 20 years, which is how long Iíve had my current car. Iím a planner so Iím thinking into my future needs as I age, and this could be my last car.

When I started this process, I never even considered anything but a sedan because thatís the only kind Iíve owned, but I saw this article and others like it and wonder if Iíd be making a mistake at this stage of my life.
https://clark.com/cars/best-cars-senior-drivers/

If I did buy an SUV, Iíd definitely want the most reliable and durable smaller crossover type so itís more compact or subcompact. As a senior driver, what do you drive, and do you prefer a sedan or SUV and why? Thanks in advance for any insight you can give me.
As a female also - I always buy new. Sorry other people

Anyway - my last four vehicles have been SUV types - small - nothing huge.

I loved my Buick Ranier the most.

I'm thinking a Honda CRV would work for you.

Rent different ones for a weekend and see what you like.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Wooster, Ohio
1,059 posts, read 806,054 times
Reputation: 1530
I buy new, too. I drive fewer than 6,000 miles a year. Used cars have so many miles on them, and the former owners don't take care of them the way I do.

I just bought a fully loaded Buick Encore Essence AWD this summer. It's not silent, but it is quiet, and it rides surprisingly well for a subcompact CUV. The 2014 Toyota Tacoma I traded in had 4WD and an HD radio with navigation (I put in a used factory HD Navigation radio). I am not willing to give up these features.

The CUV has so many advantages over a sedan: higher ground clearance, more headroom, easier entry and exit (even with the seat up I can get in without the steering wheel getting in the way of my leg), better cargo capacity especially for hauling bulky items.

The Encore won't do as well in snow as the Tacoma (less ground clearance and wider, less aggressive tires) but it will still be a big improvement over the FWD cars I had in the past.
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Old 08-29-2019, 07:00 AM
 
2,815 posts, read 1,618,429 times
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I too have always bought new. I can't seem to see the savings in buying used, because I tend to buy a new car when the discounts are big, such as when they're clearing out the previous years' inventory, where you can save an additional 2K or so. Also there's a lot more transparency in new car pricing than with used cars.
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Old 08-29-2019, 07:01 AM
 
Location: In the land beyond Ohare!
978 posts, read 523,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
As a female also - I always buy new. Sorry other people

Anyway - my last four vehicles have been SUV types - small - nothing huge.

I loved my Buick Ranier the most.

I'm thinking a Honda CRV would work for you.

Rent different ones for a weekend and see what you like.
Be careful with the Honda CRV. The "turbo" version has a issue with oil dilution that Honda claims was resolved with a software fix, however all indications are that it hasn't worked.

The non turbo version is fine.
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Old 08-29-2019, 11:27 AM
 
8,134 posts, read 5,162,675 times
Reputation: 13902
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
I too have always bought new. I can't seem to see the savings in buying used, because I tend to buy a new car when the discounts are big, such as when they're clearing out the previous years' inventory, where you can save an additional 2K or so. Also there's a lot more transparency in new car pricing than with used cars.
The savings become substantial if buying a 15-year-old car with 150K miles on Craigslist, from a private owner, who was decent caretaker of the machine, but is not an aggressive negotiator. Whether that's senseless risk or an appealing proposition, depends on one's individual circumstances, and in particular, on one's familiarity with cars.
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Old 08-29-2019, 11:52 AM
 
2,815 posts, read 1,618,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
The savings become substantial if buying a 15-year-old car with 150K miles on Craigslist, from a private owner, who was decent caretaker of the machine, but is not an aggressive negotiator. Whether that's senseless risk or an appealing proposition, depends on one's individual circumstances, and in particular, on one's familiarity with cars.
It also depends on whether you can handle down time. For us, as a one car family (by choice, not financial), reliability is very important. Safety technology also matters, so older "affordable" cars are out.

When I think "used" I think more of cars off lease or maybe a bit older. Given how much of their trouble-free life is used up, I can't make the numbers work. Even a "great" deal on a car with 100K or more miles means you're going to have a lot of downtime for maintenance, not to mention potential costs. No thank you.
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Old 08-29-2019, 12:06 PM
 
6,842 posts, read 4,265,052 times
Reputation: 17564
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I have an SUV right now, but thinking of adding a Tesla. I saw photo of a guy napping while driving. My neighbor has two Tesla and they said the car drives itself. I prefer my SUV but a self driving car like a Tesla.
NO!! There is currently NO self-driving car, no matter what your neighbor said. Teslas are not self-driving!

Two years ago my father-in-law was almost killed and his entire garage burned down when a man who had been drinking decided that it was OK to get behind the wheel of a Tesla since it "drives itself."

The last thing an older person should do is try to compensate for fading skills by getting a "car that drives itself." Maybe someday, but we are not anywhere near there yet.
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Old 08-29-2019, 12:42 PM
 
8,134 posts, read 5,162,675 times
Reputation: 13902
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
It also depends on whether you can handle down time. For us, as a one car family (by choice, not financial), reliability is very important. Safety technology also matters, so older "affordable" cars are out.

When I think "used" I think more of cars off lease or maybe a bit older. Given how much of their trouble-free life is used up, I can't make the numbers work. Even a "great" deal on a car with 100K or more miles means you're going to have a lot of downtime for maintenance, not to mention potential costs. No thank you.
You're right. And this is precisely where retirees have a demonstrable advantage. There are no children to tote-around, whose safety is paramount. There are no business-appointments to which one can't be late. An impromptu roadside repair may mean being late, showing up drenched in sweat, with greasy hands and greasy hand-prints on one's trousers. This is unacceptable if the appointment is at a corporate meeting. It's fine if the appointment is at the bridge-club. Parents or career-people can't afford to be housebound for a few days, while that new cylinder head-gasket arrives in the mail. Retirees can.

An unsafe car at 20 is, well, unsafe. Even a moderately intense collision can mean a lifetime of injury, lost earnings, maybe disfigurement, a partner who would never be met, a family that would never be formed. An unsafe car at 60 is an entirely different proposition. To be ejected from a sports-car at 80 mph, slamming into a telephone pole, just doesn't carry that same sense of loss, if you've already reached the age that's 5 years beyond what your parents ever saw, before cancer got them. The kid who wipes out in a Hayabusha or a supercharged 55 Chevy with a 632" big-block has just forfeited maybe 50 years of remaining life... not to mention the investment that society has made in him (education etc.). The elderly man who likewise wipes out, has forfeited maybe 10 years... and has saved the Social Security administration a bundle.... cynical, but true.

This is precisely why I would aver, that as we move through life, the risk and discomfort that we could abide, should actually increase.
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Old 08-29-2019, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,899 posts, read 1,078,600 times
Reputation: 3285
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay_F View Post
I see a lot of older folks driving Kia Souls, Toyota Matrix/Pontiac Vibes, and even Scion xB's... Shame the newest newest xB or Matrix/Vibes will not meet your 19 or 2020 criteria. All are reliable/very reliable, lots of room for size with great access, good mileage, easy to drive and they sit up higher than traditional sedans... Nice spot between small sedans and smallish CUVs. Good luck.
I'm not old just yet but bought as if I was. After some research decided on 2020 Soul.

Biggest reason for me that translate well to an older driver are:
Visibility- Big straight up windows and easy to see out of especially with the higher seating.
Egress- can easily climb in and out of.
Passenger and Cargo space- Comfortably sits 4 with plenty of head room and good space for groceries etc.

Over all size- Interior space but small footprint so easy to maneuver and park in tight areas.

Reasonable Cost- $25/k for a well optioned vehicle.

Safety Tech- All kinds of alerts and assists for, passing, braking, staying in lane, etc. Stuff not a big deal to me (yet) but important for my 77 year old mother.
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Old 08-29-2019, 01:18 PM
 
621 posts, read 124,597 times
Reputation: 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post

I'm thinking a Honda CRV would work for you.

That's my take. That, or the Toyota equivalent (Rav4?).



Boring as all get out, but a decent size, OK visibility (in a brave new world where you can't see out of cars), decent mileage, 4wd if needed.
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