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View Poll Results: What is the best car for senior drivers?
Sedan 24 25.00%
SUV/Crossover 72 75.00%
Voters: 96. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-02-2019, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,758 posts, read 9,830,059 times
Reputation: 11346

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
First, a large percentage of retirees ARE middle-aged. And the OP is 60. Last I checked, that was still middle-age.

Second, when was your most recent occasion for visiting a car-show? What was the apparent median age? I see plenty of men with WW2 or Korean War hats, perambulating with a walker, or perhaps in wheel-chairs. I find few car-show attendees who aren't at least in their 50s. Most are older.

Third, what do you suppose is the median age of a Corvette owner? According to this site, it's 61: https://www.corvetteactioncenter.com...e-think-again/

I quite agree about the irrelevance of "the latest tech". But that's the whole point! "The latest tech" appeals to persons who regard cars as being mere appliances. Enthusiasts prefer carburetors and manual transmissions. In other words, retirement is the perfect time to buy, enjoy and drive that 240Z. But apparently not on this forum.

I read once that the reason so many older guys have nice sports cars, like the Corvette, is that they can finally afford the insurance!
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Old 09-02-2019, 01:22 PM
 
8,224 posts, read 5,199,953 times
Reputation: 13998
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFJourney View Post
...I don't know of any other small compact SUV/CUV that would be considered more reliable, have longevity or have better pick up other than a RAV4, ...Even though I wasn't crazy about the acceleration with the Camry ...
Sorry for so aggressively cropping the quote from your post, but you mention twice the desire for sprightly acceleration. And I thank you for doing this! Too often, we value non-performance attributes, ending up with sluggish cars. This is fine for a very elderly person who foremost needs convenient and comfortable transportation, but that isn't really you, is it?

Though normally I'm skeptical of new technology, here's a perhaps odd option to consider: a Tesla Model-3. Excellent acceleration, and reasonable comfort. The long-term value proposition is OK, compared to other cars of comparable performance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
I suppose you'd rather they went back to carburetors?
In some cases, yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
If you think gas engines are complex now, you should become acquainted with those from the late 70s and early 80s, with first generation pollution controls.
This complexity was superficial. It was straightforward to retrofit a late-70s car with an engine from its mid-60s ancestor, and indeed, this was commonly done. Lots of Novas and the like from circa 1978, were running around with 350s and even 454s with a single four-barrel and the various emissions contraptions expunged.

This is much harder now, with the proliferation of electronics, especially CAN-BUS, in which pretty much everything is connected to everything else. If there are many individual pieces, but the pieces can be individually swapped or removed, without destroying the whole, then the complexity is superficial. What's really complex is tight integration, where maybe there are no visible hoses or wires, but one dare not touch the least of them, lest the whole thing be put asunder.
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Old 09-02-2019, 01:38 PM
 
2,842 posts, read 1,641,068 times
Reputation: 2885
These days, you don't swap engines. You just put in a new chip. A bit easier, not to mention a whole lot more reliable. Oh yea, they're also much kinder on the air. You should have seen LA back in the 70s, especially compared to now. Yes, those were remarkable days for auto tech, when you spoiled the air and developed a deep relationship with a local mechanic, or with your greasy black hands if you did your own work.
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Old 09-02-2019, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
119 posts, read 30,178 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
For the OP, be aware that Toyota has had its share of duds including Camrys in some years. Personally, the least reliable car I ever had was a Camry, which had two transmissions go out, and had a very leaky rear main oil seal on top of that. Kept it until around 190K (hard to say exactly, since the odometer went out too) until the engine could no longer pass inspection due to wear. And yes, I followed the maintenance schedule closely, including transmission service.
Thanks. What year was it? I've been thinking about a 2019 or probably a 2020 hoping more kinks will have been worked out. Since they redesigned it in 2018, they've had complaints about the 8-speed transmission so I'm a little leery, but Consumer Reports recommends it. I'm worn out from trying to find a reliable, new car.
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Old 09-02-2019, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Lakeside, CA
284 posts, read 32,069 times
Reputation: 226
Just my .02, but I would always but at least slightly used, to avoid the $$ hit....and avoid any new fangled stuff, esp 'auto-driving'. Keep it simple, less stuff to distract, less stuff to fix when it breaks.....
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Old 09-02-2019, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
119 posts, read 30,178 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by volosong View Post
With your stated quality of being frugal, take a look at a RAV4 hybrid. Sure, it has a CVT, but Toyota does not introduce technology until it is well proven. CVTs in the Prius have been around for a long time now without any major concerns. The RAV4 hybrid CVT has been available since 2016, again without issues. It is almost always a "Recommended" product on Consumer Reports. My Lexus RX400H, (a Toyota product), was a AWD hybrid and I sold it after 200,000 miles of trouble free use. The person I sold it to is still using it three years later, still trouble free.
Thanks. I am frugal, which is why I can't justify the expense of a hybrid. I don't drive enough. I just want a regular gas car that's been proven. I also don't know if I'm even going to like driving a CUV or SUV yet in addition to my gut feeling that those are way more car than I need. Here's an active thread about the RAV4 hybrid that's not so rosey.

New Toyota RAV4 Hybrid Gets Another Disappointing Review
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Old 09-02-2019, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
119 posts, read 30,178 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
OP, Unless I missed it, you didn't really say what your criteria was, except that you wanted it to last 20-years and are now 60-years old.

The first (20-years) would tend to eliminate many of the newer, low-end vehicles. The second (60 ... not very 'senior') might suggest an SUV, letting you sit up higher and see more of what is happening around you ... and perhaps give you a little better protection from the high percentage of SUV's and larger vehicles on the road today.
My criteria is reliability, longevity, safety and resale value. I'm worried about the hurricane now so may be forgetting something else that's important to me.

What cars do you consider lower end? I don't want a lower or higher end, but I guess somewhere in the middle. I have a 1999 BMW 323i now. I'm getting rid of it because of it's age, but mainly because they're very expensive to repair, and I have a few mechanical issues now. I'd love to buy the good ole' reliable Lexus, but I don't want to spend that much again.

One of the reasons I thought maybe an SUV would be a good move is that they supposedly do give you better protection, but I wonder if any organization has done a study and proven that to be true.

BTW-I don't consider myself a senior at all since I'm a very young 60. But, since I hope to keep my next car until I'm at least 80, I figured I'd get some great insight from the smart and wise people on this forum.
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Old 09-02-2019, 02:42 PM
 
2,842 posts, read 1,641,068 times
Reputation: 2885
OP, you're never going to find a vehicle everyone likes. Too many varied tastes out there, from folks like me, who view a car/SUV as just transportation, to folks that view it as a public statement of their personality, to those that want to telegraph their "success" - common among owners of premium brands, to performance enthusiasts.

Reliability? Much depends on how you define it, and how you measure it. Consumer Reports, the gold standard to many, has its own limitations, including hair-splitting in some categories. Almost all cars these days are quite reliable, especially compared to decades back. There are of course, exceptions, but they tend to either get fixed by manufacturers pretty quickly or they leave the market, like happened to the Yugo (and Fiat for that matter) some time back. Yes, new models their first year tend to have more things to be fixed, but under warranty.

If I were in your shoes, I'd do as many test drives of different things as I could, trying out different brands and models to find what works for me. Sure, I'd read the reviews and such, but mostly to get an idea of what to look for. After all, I'm not a professional automobile reviewer/writer, so I no doubt will see things differently.

Remember too that criticism generally gets more eyeballs than praise, whether online or in print.
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Old 09-02-2019, 03:40 PM
 
479 posts, read 1,048,383 times
Reputation: 698
Red Corvette Convert or Toyota Prius
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Old 09-02-2019, 03:47 PM
 
12,055 posts, read 20,612,481 times
Reputation: 19663
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFJourney View Post
Thanks. I am frugal, which is why I can't justify the expense of a hybrid. I don't drive enough. I just want a regular gas car that's been proven. I also don't know if I'm even going to like driving a CUV or SUV yet in addition to my gut feeling that those are way more car than I need. Here's an active thread about the RAV4 hybrid that's not so rosey.

New Toyota RAV4 Hybrid Gets Another Disappointing Review
I love my Kia Niro hybrid. It wasnít any more than a similar car cost wise, I am still consistently first out the gate at a stop light, and I generally get 47 MPG. Nice and zippy.

Itís relaxing to drive. Itís comfortable. Itís about the same size as a Prius for less money. A hatchback, although I guess thatís what we call a crossover.

Can carry a Christmas tree. I didnít get a plug-in, just a regular gas/electric hybrid. I canít say enough about how much I love that car.
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