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Old 08-26-2019, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,218 posts, read 8,763,366 times
Reputation: 6299

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SFBayBoomer View Post
Sorry, I stopped reading when you wrote the sentence I bolded in red. I am extremely happy that nonsmokers like myself and all the living family I have left can enjoy bars and restaurants and workspaces and wherever else we like without having to involuntarily inhale all the crap in cigarettes. The good old days were mostly good, but the smokiness wasn't good at all.
This was copied from a post talking about this time period. I actually do not smoke. It was mostly about the carefree times, being able to walk down streets by yourself and not worry. People knew each other.

Sorry for the confusion.
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Old Yesterday, 12:15 AM
 
5,437 posts, read 3,512,728 times
Reputation: 13726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post

And that man that bombed and burned that school full of kids back in the 1890s or so.

Public hangings of people that were of a different race - yep the good old days.
I think the above was a typo and you meant the 1990's, yes? (or maybe not and it wasn't a typo))

You were maybe thinking of the bombing below which killed children in the daycare center located in the bombed Federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995 which killed 168 people:

Timothy McVeigh with a rental truck filled with explosives is detonated outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on April 19, 1995 (24 years ago)

Oklahoma City bombing
https://www.fbi.gov/history/famous-c...a-city-bombing
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Old Yesterday, 12:59 AM
 
45 posts, read 5,546 times
Reputation: 65
I can't think back to anytime we left doors unlocked, but I can think back to a time when locks did more than just keep honest people out.

I don't know if the difference is gun education and the opportunity as a socially accepted/expected pastime of hunting animals, but I know Idaho has fewer gun related deaths than other states that also have hunting seasons.

I like the fact that Idaho is more family oriented and civically social than other cities who allow gang activities, I like being able to walk through downtown without a worry of violence or a shooting.

I would not like a one song radio station. I know that is a stretch and I am intentionally taking it wrong, but just saying.

I used to get teased by my friends in larger cities that they had to look up fashions of ten/twenty years back to fit in when visiting Idaho, that they had never seen an airport that closed in a municipality this big, that "the five taxis in 'Idaho' had to make numerous trips to accommodate", that there "are only 5 hotels in Boise", but I notice they sneak in to hotspring, fish (hey, you can Eat the fish!!!), camp, and hunt.
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Old Yesterday, 06:31 AM
 
6,486 posts, read 5,199,314 times
Reputation: 13328
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I think the above was a typo and you meant the 1990's, yes? (or maybe not and it wasn't a typo))

You were maybe thinking of the bombing below which killed children in the daycare center located in the bombed Federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995 which killed 168 people:

Timothy McVeigh with a rental truck filled with explosives is detonated outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on April 19, 1995 (24 years ago)

Oklahoma City bombing
https://www.fbi.gov/history/famous-c...a-city-bombing
no - and it was 1927 - don't know why 1890s stuck in my head - see getting old

The Bath School disaster, also known as the Bath School massacre, was a series of violent attacks perpetrated by Andrew Kehoe on May 18, 1927, Bath Township, Michigan. The attacks killed 38 elementary schoolchildren and six adults, and also injured at least 58 other people.[Note 1] Prior to his timed explosives going off at the school building, Kehoe had murdered his wife and firebombed his farm. Arriving at the site of the school explosion, Kehoe died when he detonated explosives concealed in his truck.
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Old Yesterday, 06:38 AM
 
6,486 posts, read 5,199,314 times
Reputation: 13328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willamette City View Post
We live in that neighborhood today. I know all my neighbors and say hi when I see them. We respect each others privacy, but nobody has a problem with a quick visit. I don't lock my car in the daytime, leave the house unlocked unless we leave for the day, or are in for the night. We live in a small town (3200) with all the services we need. We love living here and it's like Mayberry in a lot of ways.
I live in a small town also, but always lock my car when it is parked at my house

I don't want to get out of the habit of locking it whenever i go anywhere else. I even lock it when i am pumping gas, since i leave my purse in the car. People have been known to have items stolen while at the gas pump.

We small town people will go to the big city and forget that we are not among our "neighbors". Better safe than sorry.
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Old Yesterday, 06:43 AM
 
6,486 posts, read 5,199,314 times
Reputation: 13328
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdahoanAgain View Post
I can't think back to anytime we left doors unlocked, but I can think back to a time when locks did more than just keep honest people out.

I don't know if the difference is gun education and the opportunity as a socially accepted/expected pastime of hunting animals, but I know Idaho has fewer gun related deaths than other states that also have hunting seasons.

I like the fact that Idaho is more family oriented and civically social than other cities who allow gang activities, I like being able to walk through downtown without a worry of violence or a shooting.

I would not like a one song radio station. I know that is a stretch and I am intentionally taking it wrong, but just saying.

I used to get teased by my friends in larger cities that they had to look up fashions of ten/twenty years back to fit in when visiting Idaho, that they had never seen an airport that closed in a municipality this big, that "the five taxis in 'Idaho' had to make numerous trips to accommodate", that there "are only 5 hotels in Boise", but I notice they sneak in to hotspring, fish (hey, you can Eat the fish!!!), camp, and hunt.
I don't know - mention Idaho and i think of the "aryan nation".

https://www.tolerance.org/classroom-...-private-idaho
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Old Yesterday, 06:52 AM
 
26 posts, read 10,947 times
Reputation: 141
Ignorance is bliss. Back when I was a kid, there was no internet. There was no cable tv. News came on the TV at 6pm and lasted about 30 minutes. We got the local newspaper delivered, but most of that was local news. Today we have 24/7 news channels and they are all heavily slanted toward reporting negative political stories. Rather than going about your day talking to friends and classmates, you are constantly barraged by negative news on Cable TV, Twitter, Internet. Things were just as bad or worse back in the 70's/80's, but you just weren't as aware of it.
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Old Yesterday, 07:02 AM
 
772 posts, read 138,957 times
Reputation: 721
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcandme View Post
Plain and simple..... the internet happened.
Riots and chaos were here before internet.

The biggest problem is people being forced to associate with other people. America has been too fixated on making everyone want to be rich and wanting to rub elbows with celebrities and others at the top of the social ladder. Nothing is really wrong with being a simple person, but most Americans dislike anyone who does desire being so far above comfortable that it becomes all about becoming filthy rich.
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Old Yesterday, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,087 posts, read 54,700,313 times
Reputation: 30994
The best examination of the start of the cultural shifts that I've run across is in the book "The Drinking Life."

The author describes growing up in Brooklyn as a child, prior to the introduction of radio. Effectively ALL entertainment was a social activity of some sort, and most transportation was public. There was no real privacy unless you were rich, and even then privacy was limited. People were forced into interacting by the nature of existence.

When radio arrived, the evenings on front porches talking with neighbors changed to closed doors and families gathered around a radio, listening to the magic box that brought them the performances of famous people, performances otherwise unavailable.

When television arrived, the change increased, and then air conditioning sealed off the outdoors for he half the year that conversation was at least possible.

Each subsequent technology shift has worked towards more dependence on technology for rewards and entertainment. With the lack of connection to immediate surroundings comes fear of the unknown. Te phone is only the latest fetish object.

Go into an Appalachian holler where there is no cell reception, no television, no internet, and only one or two radio stations and you can still find families that know the sex lives of their neighbors for three generations back, who does what, and all the interrelations.
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Old Yesterday, 10:46 AM
 
8,111 posts, read 5,155,686 times
Reputation: 13880
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
The best examination of the start of the cultural shifts that I've run across is in the book "The Drinking Life."

The author describes growing up in Brooklyn as a child, prior to the introduction of radio. Effectively ALL entertainment was a social activity of some sort, and most transportation was public. There was no real privacy unless you were rich, and even then privacy was limited. People were forced into interacting by the nature of existence.

When radio arrived, the evenings on front porches talking with neighbors changed to closed doors ...
That's a good point. The watershed transformation happened not during the childhood or youth of today's retirees, but 2-3 generations prior, circa 1900-1925. Radio, telegraph, railroads, steamships, construction techniques that made multi-story buildings inexpensive, mass-production, electricity,...
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