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Old 08-27-2019, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,616 posts, read 8,069,155 times
Reputation: 54001

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Well I ride my bike after midnight, walk my dog after the 10pm news, leave my doors open into the wee hours of the morning, sit on my front porch swing late at night, and have even left the front door open all night when we both worked the night shift. There are places that are safe. You lost me at smoking a cigarette at the bar. I wouldn't have a drink at a bar for decades because I didn't want to breath toxic air. Some parts of the good old days disappearing is better for innocent people not being forced to breath preventable pollution.

I consider our little village "Mayberry" complete with this fun Irish bar and Mom and Pop ice cream shop. We have a sweet diner and people talk across the tables to one another. My house is the go to place on Halloween and we actually enjoy being with our neighbors. We have deer, coyotes, hawks, possums, raccoons, and unfortunately, skunks. It's wild watching deer walk down the shoveled sidewalks after a big snowfall. I love it here.
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Old 08-27-2019, 11:19 AM
 
Location: equator
3,778 posts, read 1,661,694 times
Reputation: 9442
Air-conditioning is a good point. The locals here don't have it, and they are outside all the time, socializing on stoops or sidewalks. Front doors are hanging open. Sometimes I wonder who is working!

I have great memories growing up---galloping our ponies in the Santa Ana river bed, past bums who yelled at us. Bicycling everywhere; parents not knowing where we were. No planned activities!

BUT...in the 60s my friend and I were accosted by a guy with a knife who herded us into a tiny room with what intentions...

At 16, a trusted old neighbor guy forced a kiss on me. My parents didn't want to hear about it.

In the 70s my college professor seduced me with no repercussions.

Stuff happened back then too, but was kept quiet.
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Old 08-27-2019, 01:34 PM
 
531 posts, read 800,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Air-conditioning is a good point. The locals here don't have it, and they are outside all the time, socializing on stoops or sidewalks. Front doors are hanging open. Sometimes I wonder who is working!

I have great memories growing up---galloping our ponies in the Santa Ana river bed, past bums who yelled at us. Bicycling everywhere; parents not knowing where we were. No planned activities!

BUT...in the 60s my friend and I were accosted by a guy with a knife who herded us into a tiny room with what intentions...

At 16, a trusted old neighbor guy forced a kiss on me. My parents didn't want to hear about it.

In the 70s my college professor seduced me with no repercussions.

Stuff happened back then too, but was kept quiet.
I think this really hits the nail on the head. The murder rate and rate of other violent crimes was way higher in the 70s and 80s than it is today (despite the mass shootings). And you hear about all these child molestation cases from that time period which only came to light way later. Basically, people were just less aware of the horrible things going on. The modern media has a lot to do with it, publicizing all the awful stories. But on the plus side, since people are so much more aware of crime they are more in a position to prevent it.

As for the hate between groups that is in the news a lot... when I was growing up in the 70s and 80s the older people were constantly making racist comments. Certain housing developments were off-limits to blacks and so on. Women were considered inappropriate for many jobs. While people didn't necessarily express anger or hate towards minorities, prejudice and discrimination were rampant. And gays were often lumped together with child molesters as deviants who shouldn't be tolerated.

So yes, if you were a straight white person in the suburbs who was unaware of the murders and other crimes going on, and could shrug off discrimination towards everyone else, then life could be idyllic. I don't necessarily think this is a good thing.
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Old 08-27-2019, 01:52 PM
 
148 posts, read 51,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Genghis View Post
I think this really hits the nail on the head. The murder rate and rate of other violent crimes was way higher in the 70s and 80s than it is today (despite the mass shootings). And you hear about all these child molestation cases from that time period which only came to light way later. Basically, people were just less aware of the horrible things going on. The modern media has a lot to do with it, publicizing all the awful stories. But on the plus side, since people are so much more aware of crime they are more in a position to prevent it.

As for the hate between groups that is in the news a lot... when I was growing up in the 70s and 80s the older people were constantly making racist comments. Certain housing developments were off-limits to blacks and so on. Women were considered inappropriate for many jobs. While people didn't necessarily express anger or hate towards minorities, prejudice and discrimination were rampant. And gays were often lumped together with child molesters as deviants who shouldn't be tolerated.

So yes, if you were a straight white person in the suburbs who was unaware of the murders and other crimes going on, and could shrug off discrimination towards everyone else, then life could be idyllic. I don't necessarily think this is a good thing.
Bingo! What these idealistic people crave or remember is what I would call a "tunnelvision" view of the past. They were simply oblivious to what was happening to less favored Americans.
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Old 08-27-2019, 02:28 PM
 
2,672 posts, read 708,693 times
Reputation: 4709
Everything went downhill fast beginning August 18, 1920.
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Old 08-27-2019, 03:18 PM
 
7,110 posts, read 3,938,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
I read this post and have been thinking about this and what kind of world our children will inherit.
Even though some had rough times in life or tough childhoods, I have been coming back to his words and it just makes me sad.

I want to go back to a time when this song was on the radio every day. I want to be able to leave the back door and the car unlocked. I want kids riding their bike in the street. I want neighbours who know each other and say good morning. I want to be able to walk home alone at night without fear of being raped or robbed. I want Sunday lunch with friends. I want to have a cigarette at the bar without the "looks". I want to be able to speak without fear of someone listening until they can find something to be offended by. If anyone knows of a place like that which still exists....please, let me know.

This was talking about 1976 so what changed? Did I play a part? I did get married, have 2 children but I couldn't be a SAHM even though I wrestled with it. I did have a grandma for hire who came to my home and was a part of our family for 20 years.

I remember 1976. High school football games; my brother was a DE - he played against Mark Richt in HS (became the UM coach a few years ago and was at FSU and Georgia; everyone went to the games and then I remember we would all go home in time to watch Dallas. My dad just loved that old JR.

But, it seems we all spent more time together then. In the 1980's, we all got married and had kids but we all spent time together. Was it working a lot? The internet?

I think the wisdom from this board will come up with some good answers.
It was never quite like that. Especially in big cities. People get nostalgic about their youth, but things weren't as perfect as our memories lead us to believe.

Even so, there are towns where kids ride their bikes on the streets, whether the neighbors know each other & say hi or wave. I live in such a neighborhood. There are cities where groups of women friends meet for lunch on Sundays (my friends in Dallas and I would do that on occasion..and include a movie).

It was always the case that a person could be offensive when speaking. That hasn't changed, except there are probably more things that are considered offensive, as we've become a society more accepting of those not exactly like the majority. To laugh about making a starlet sleep with you for a job used to be accepted, maybe even cool. It's a good thing that that is no longer acceptable.

Sometimes when people move from small-town USA to the big city, they think the country has changed. But all that has changed is that they moved to a more vibrant & interesting, but more crowded & less safe city.
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:17 PM
 
Location: State of Denial
1,963 posts, read 1,001,154 times
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I grew up in the late 1940's to the mid 1960's.


I don't think my parents had a key to the door. They may have locked it at night from the inside, but I don't remember it ever being locked from the outside.


They certainly didn't know where we were all the time. We were the original "free-range" children that the current parents thought they had given birth to the first of. As long as you were home for dinner, everybody was happy.


About the only thing that scared me was whether my mother was going to find out what I had been doing....LOL.
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Southern California
24,935 posts, read 8,772,009 times
Reputation: 16215
Everything changed with invention of TV.
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Old 08-27-2019, 05:28 PM
 
180 posts, read 97,296 times
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I guess it really depends on where you live.

As a kid in the 1950s and early 1960s I lived in an apartment in Brooklyn. We always locked the doors! The neighborhood got really bad in the 1970s as well as in mid town Manhattan....it wasn't nice and one didn't feel safe. I feel much safer now when going into NYC today. It's more family friendly and most of the trash and porn shops are now gone from Times Square.

In 1965 we moved to south Jersey. As a kid I felt safe there but my mother would always lock the doors...a habit from living in the city. One didn't hear about school shootings but I remember hearing about plane hijackings. It seemed that by being in the news a lot just gave rise to copycats. I believe that all of the media attention focused on school shootings brings more out of the woodwork.

However there was a mass shooting in an office building only a mile away from our housing development in 1972. The shooter shot 12 people killing 6.....it was very shocking!! ....and so close to home!

Today we live in a very nice family friendly community. Crime is almost non existent. When we moved here almost 30 years ago kids played in the streets and many people left their doors unlocked. Now the kids are all grown and new families have moved in. We're still here and occasionally I will forget to lock my car doors when out on the driveway and I'll also leave packages out on my front porch for the mail carrier to pick up.

I realize that anything bad can happen but I believe the chances are slim where we live....there are still great neighborhoods to live in.
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Old 08-27-2019, 07:37 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
20,234 posts, read 19,239,100 times
Reputation: 34516
If you grew up in the 40s and 50s, you probably remember a good childhood. There were rules and most of the time you obeyed them and there was fun out there for the making. Teachers were strict so kids sat still and learned. The rules made you feel safe and secure.

It was a great time to be a kid. Not such a great time to be an adult probably. Women were discriminated against, in fact, being a girl, that had an effect on me. I would see ads on tv that showed women fluttering around in aprons, then putting on their makeup and getting hubby's slippers with no regard for themselves. Women weren't supposed to have any interests outside the home. This, I didn't "get" and even as a kid, it bothered me. Would I have to grow up to be like them?

But it was such a great time to be a kid. Hoola hoops, riding your bike to your friend's house, taking a walk around the neighborhood after supper, no organized activities unless you took piano or ballet lessons--you went out into the yard and built a fort or a tree house or took off for the town swimming pool in summer on your bike. Maybe you'd go lie on the floor in the town library all day on a rainy day, reading a pile of interesting books you'd chosen.

TV--they warned that it would be the end of us. Maybe it was the beginning of the end. But at least the shows were wholesome and I don't remember shows about murder and crime unless it was some cowboy in a while hate who was a role model for us. TV didn't corrupt us. Maybe it started to do that later as the shows became more and more violent and blood and guts programs were allowed during prime time when kids were still awake to watch them.

Looking back, it probably has been the technology that's done us in. It's good and it's bad. They warned us that we would become fat and flabby and unfit by sitting indoors watching tv. In some ways that's become true, especially later on with more and more things to do that required you to be in the house, just sitting there.
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