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Old 08-27-2019, 05:09 PM
 
12,259 posts, read 5,362,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
Slightly off topic but I guess you have researched historical flood levels, right? I think you said the house you have an eye on is quite old so that is a point in it's favor.



Many old towns are built up next to a river as the river provided transport to the "outside world". But the rivers also flooded then, and now.
The town is protected by a flood wall which has not been breached. Also, the town is nestled between hills and the river with many homes built well above flood level. The place I'm choosing to buy is above any area that would flood. I've checked flood maps regarding this.
I believe the last time the Ohio River flooded this town was in the 1930s before the wall was built.


Last edited by marino760; 08-27-2019 at 05:23 PM..
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Old 08-27-2019, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,466 posts, read 45,392,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
The town is protected by a flood wall which has not been breached. Also, the town is nestled between hills and the river with many homes built well above flood level. The place I'm choosing to buy is above any area that would flood. I've checked flood maps regarding this.
I believe the last time the Ohio River flooded this town was in the 1930s before the wall was built.

Can't rep you again so soon, but anyway I figured you would have done your homework on this.


But figured I would bring it up as a good topic for people thinking about relocating to think about.
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Old 08-27-2019, 05:29 PM
 
657 posts, read 142,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
2007 SUV owner here - 61K miles. I don't drive around a lot either. I do have to keep a car since where i live i can't just walk down the street to the store. I did quit going to the more distant places in order to support my local store.

Maybe keep your car for a few months to a year and see how it works out.
Just to get back on track.

Our cars have 66k (2004) and 33k (2008) and I'm seeing the usage go down.

I have no great love of cars for everyday use. I think our next move will be to somewhere that is even more walkable than the current town (which is quite walkable), and I'll sell those cars and simply get something interesting for the occasional doctor visit, very occasional retail trip, emergencies. Maybe something like a 1970 440+6 Challenger would be about right.
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Old 08-27-2019, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
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We sold the country home where it was 3.5 miles to the grocers, banks, etc.
Moved to the city, walk everywhere and use the area wide transit (Seattle region, $1 fare for 2.5 hours).
We use Metromile for auto ins. (Metered). We drove 150miles in July.
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Old 08-27-2019, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,496 posts, read 3,164,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike555 View Post
I've been retired since 2005, but gave up driving, at least temporarily, a little over a year ago and haven't really missed it. Stores are within easy walking distance. If for some reason I need to take the bus, I have a senior citizens bus pass so I can ride the bus for thirty cents. I might decide to start driving again at some point, but for now I'm fine doing without.
Walking is a misery for some of us. Driving is much easier.
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Old 08-27-2019, 08:04 PM
 
2,505 posts, read 6,459,369 times
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I am wondering where the parts to repair a 21 year old vehicle will come from.
I am 86,my 99 Tacoma went on the market in October '98.It is basicly showroom and I expect to live maybe another 4 years???It still has rear brake shoes after 209,000 miles,the only part replaced was catalytic converter.
My driving days are over,have driven a little over 3,000 miles locally in past 4 years.
I hate the thought of another vehicle.
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Old 08-27-2019, 10:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I didn't want to hijack the other thread here about driving, but am wondering if anyone has given up owning a car after retiring.
I'm having mixed feelings about doing this. I'm moving to a small town after retiring and purposely planning to buy a home within easy walking distance to most things I need in the downtown area. There is also public transportation available which is no out of pocket cost for seniors. I just need to get a bus pass and can ride the bus as often as I want. The town is small enough where every corner along the bus route is a potential stop, you just have to wave the bus driver to stop and pick you up. The route would take me to the big box stores, hospital and medical area as well. There is also a taxi service available.
I'm not big on driving around and really don't enjoy it but maybe that's because I live in So Cal currently where I feel like driving is a big hassle, dangerous and just not enjoyable 90 percent of the time.
I have a 2011 kia with only 55,000 miles on it. That should tell you how little I drive now. Do I spend the money transporting my car across the country or sell it, rent a car for a couple of weeks when I first move there to get major shopping done and get situated?
I feel like if I transport my car over there, after a couple of weeks, the car will just sit there with very little use. If I don't transport my car, I can rent a car every once in a while to take road trips when I feel like it, and I won't have the hassle of car maintenance and registration.
Money really isn't the big issue here. I can buy another car if I decide I really don't like the bus system and miss driving. I'm traveling there again in a couple of weeks, will get a bus pass and check it out.
Any thoughts? Has anyone gone without a car after retiring?
Where you are going do they have an option like zip car? Its a service where you can sign up and when you need a car, you can check one out at Zipcar parking spaces in various spots around. Im thinking that might be the way to go. You wont need a car to take your car, when you need a car you can zip car.
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Old 08-27-2019, 11:25 PM
 
149 posts, read 69,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
Same here. I only shop once a month so it's a 'full load' and I would be totally lost without my car. I live one to two miles from any major shopping and it's just way too hot to even think about walking to any of it. We do have a bus line, with a stop just across the street, but I've never had to use it. I was thrilled when Walmart started their order groceries online and pickup at the store. I understand they are going to start home delivery soon. As many senior citizens this town has I'm sure there'll be a lot of them taking advantage of that.
Please allow me to point out some of the major advantages of living in a city like New York as a retiree. My wife and I live in Brooklyn, same place for the past 32 years. We gave up our car in 2000 and have never looked back.

For groceries we have Fresh Direct, an online grocer that has practically anything you need in the kitchen, including spirits, wine and beer. We go online, use any of our saved shopping lists, put together an order, and pick a delivery date and time (within a two-hour window), and the groceries arrive, including cases of water and/or beer, cat food and litter, super-sized packages of paper towels and toilet paper. All carried into the kitchen for us.

There is an associated service called FoodKick, where you can shop for grocery items and have them delivered the same day, again within a two-hour window. (Look up Fresh Direct and/or FoodKick online and see for yourself what they have and what the prices are.)

If we feel like wed rather eat in than cook or go out, we can use Grubhub, or DoorDash, or Caviar to order from our neighborhood restaurants and have the meal delivered.

For laundry and dry-cleaning, I call our local cleaning service each Wednesday and schedule a pickup. They tell me the price of last weeks load and I meet the delivery guy at the door, where I give him the dirty laundry and the fee for the clean laundry he is delivering, plus a tip.

For transportation we have senior citizen rates for the bus/subway, or we have Uber and Lyft, or we have the good old NYC yellow cabs. We also have Citi Bike, which has bike sharing should we want to ride a bike. And there is always Zip Car if we feel like we need a car for an afternoon or an evening. Plus when we travel to other major cities that have Zip Car, we can use them there as needed.

This all comes at a cost, of course, but its more reasonable than you might think. We are thankful that we can afford to be retired in a city like New York, and that we can afford to avail ourselves of these services. I guess that what Im trying to point out is that NYC is a pretty good place to live as a retired person if you can afford it.
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Old 08-27-2019, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,524 posts, read 7,848,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanBev View Post
I am wondering where the parts to repair a 21 year old vehicle will come from.
I am 86,my 99 Tacoma went on the market in October '98.It is basicly showroom and I expect to live maybe another 4 years???It still has rear brake shoes after 209,000 miles,the only part replaced was catalytic converter.
My driving days are over,have driven a little over 3,000 miles locally in past 4 years.
I hate the thought of another vehicle.
No reason to sell it if you still need it as an occasional vehicle. A 1999 Tacoma in good condition like yours is a very hot item in the used vehicle market. There are so many of them still on the road, that all repair parts are widely available at reasonable prices. It is of the vintage where fuel injection was high quality, the motors / mechanical systems were reliable and before they became technology overloaded. Do it yourself mechanics love these vehicles because they can be worked on without many special tools that only dealers or high end shops would have. Shop mechanics love them too, because they are easier and therefore less expensive to work on. There are far fewer electronic "sensors" to fail that often cost hundreds just to diagnose.

In Arizona and other states in the southwest, there are always buyers looking for older pickups like yours because they will likely not have any body or frame rust. These buyers will then send these vehicles to sell in other markets in the US, Mexico or even ship them in a container or via "roll on - roll off" to countries in South America!
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Old 08-28-2019, 05:03 AM
 
12,259 posts, read 5,362,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
Where you are going do they have an option like zip car? Its a service where you can sign up and when you need a car, you can check one out at Zipcar parking spaces in various spots around. Im thinking that might be the way to go. You wont need a car to take your car, when you need a car you can zip car.
No, there is no zipcar available although that sounds very ideal. There is a taxi service though.
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