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Old Yesterday, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Arizona
207 posts, read 121,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post

So, in short, do you think that people were more accepting of change 50 years ago than they are today -- or less accepting?
Great question/topic.

More accepting today than 50 years ago in some cases, less accepting in others.

I think people were less aware and less affected by the changes 50 years ago except for the changes they saw in their daily lives, their neighborhoods etc. While the changes were radical in some cases, "out of sight, out of mind" was probably more common than "accepting" at least in small towns.

Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
(Yes, many people were upset about racial mixing and desegregation, but by 1970, I think most people had accepted racial integration.)
Perfect example of it all depended where you lived and still does. Integration forced by law is not the same as acceptance. I moved from a Chicago suburb to Hawaii in 1971. Hawaii was by far more racially integrated and accepting than the area I came from (Arlington Heights, not a small suburb even back then)
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Old Yesterday, 11:04 AM
 
Location: USA
192 posts, read 26,388 times
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I really don't know. I was like 10 years old 50 years ago. I do know that people believed in not discussing money, religion or politics. It was considered impolite. What they shared with those closest to them, I wasn't privy to. They didn't discuss stuff like that in front us kids.
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Old Yesterday, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
57,048 posts, read 55,345,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Yes, but we were exposed to our parents, grandparents, neighbors, etc. Do you remember hearing any of the people you knew actually becoming angry and upset about the changes going on then? As I said, I don't except for long-haired hippies.

I do, however, remember MANY people getting upset about the various Presidential candidates of the time -- it seemed that many people were either very much for Nixon or very much against him! -- but just not getting outraged over social changes, like blacks and whites dating each other. (Actually, on second thought, I do remember people getting upset over busing, but not about integration in general.)

I am just wondering if my experience was different from most.
Yes, I definitely remember people becoming angry and upset over those changes, particularly in my mother's family--uncles, the aforementioned grandfather, and people in the church (Reformed Church) in general.

Before my sister met her husband, I remember the horror when the daughter of one of my mother's closest friends married a Jamaican and then went marching on Washington for civil rights.

I can hear my mother telling me how a family friend who had grown up in the city of Paterson, NJ, where both black and white people lived, had told her that they used to have dances and all the black kids would be on one side of the gym and the white people on the other and it worked out best for everyone that way. (Mom is now 90 and no longer holds these views, by the way. She loves my brother-in-law and her biracial granddaughter).

People were very upset about others having sex before marriage and living together. My cousin's cousin on her other side got pregnant after she got engaged but before she was married. They quickly set a wedding date and then told everyone the baby was born prematurely. I was a teenager when that happened, so it was definitely still the Seventies.
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Last edited by Mightyqueen801; Yesterday at 11:22 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 11:08 AM
 
7,163 posts, read 1,549,624 times
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I think location is a VERY good point. I think it is true that urban people are less resistant to change than rural people are, but maybe I am mistaken.

I also think that it is very important which region you are from. I lived in SoCal from 1963-1986, so maybe California was much more liberal than other sections of the U.S. then, too. The changes I mentioned seemed to be accepted very quickly -- like almost overnight. For example, dress codes were entirely eliminated in the high school I attended by 1968, if I remember correctly. And almost everyone I knew had a sister or brother who was living with someone by 1973, and I don't recall anyone expressing any outrage about that. (And this was a working class community, btw -- not Venice Beach, lol.)

Last edited by katharsis; Yesterday at 11:19 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 11:25 AM
 
5,197 posts, read 2,538,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post

So, in short, do you think that people were more accepting of change 50 years ago than they are today -- or less accepting?

(I would also like to know any of your thoughts and personal experiences related to this subject -- and also please feel free to add more items to either list and to disagree with anything I wrote!)
I think our generation has little choice but to be accepting of new politically correct social views, but will have more difficulties maintaining acceptance of current changes as we age. The main reason for this is that we will simply forget about current changes as we age and revert to what we learned earlier in life. For example, a male friend was entering a change room just as a female walked in. He politely pointed out that it's the men's change room. Wrong. What was once a polite remark intended to assist is now an offensive remark. We have to remember that it's okay for women to be in the men's room, it's not intuitive as it might be with people who are born today.

Forgetting about flower power and hippy long hair etc. doesn't present any serious social problems, but an entire generation of forgetful old people who don't remember how to use technology or that gender is fluid are going to run into trouble with a younger generation who may not be forgiving of people who can't remember the new normal.

In short, I think people are more accepting of change than 50 years ago, but because that acceptance represents a diametric shift in "normal," it may not be a permanent acceptance.
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Old Yesterday, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
57,048 posts, read 55,345,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
I think location is a VERY good point. I think it is true that urban people are less resistant to change than rural people are, but maybe I am mistaken.

I also think that it is very important which region you are from. I lived in SoCal from 1963-1986, so maybe California was much more liberal than other sections of the U.S. then, too. The changes I mentioned seemed to be accepted very quickly -- like almost overnight. For example, dress codes were entirely eliminated in the high school I attended by 1968, if I remember correctly. And almost everyone I knew had a sister or brother who was living with someone by 1973, and I don't recall anyone expressing any outrage about that. (And this was a working class community, btw -- not Venice Beach, lol.)
I think you are right about location. I was neither urban nor rural, but right smack in the mostly-white NJ suburbs of NYC. Nowadays NJ is very liberal and open-minded and very diverse racially, religiously, and in all other ways, but those small enclaves of prejudice still exist. As a matter of fact, they exist in my old hometown, where my 64-year-old cousin carries on the torch of bigotry passed to him by our long-dead grandfather.

At his father's funeral in 2006, I saw my other cousin's husband who I used to see in the morning when getting my coffee to take on the train. He worked in the area and was often in the same shop, which was owned by an Indian man who'd had the shop for 20 years.

I mentioned that I hadn't run into him for a while, and my cousin, standing in front of his father's casket, snarled, "Oh you, too? Giving your money to an INDIAN?"
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Old Yesterday, 11:36 AM
 
7,163 posts, read 1,549,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
I think our generation has little choice but to be accepting of new politically correct social views, but will have more difficulties maintaining acceptance of current changes as we age. The main reason for this is that we will simply forget about current changes as we age and revert to what we learned earlier in life. For example, a male friend was entering a change room just as a female walked in. He politely pointed out that it's the men's change room. Wrong. What was once a polite remark intended to assist is now an offensive remark. We have to remember that it's okay for women to be in the men's room, it's not intuitive as it might be with people who are born today.

Forgetting about flower power and hippy long hair etc. doesn't present any serious social problems, but an entire generation of forgetful old people who don't remember how to use technology or that gender is fluid are going to run into trouble with a younger generation who may not be forgiving of people who can't remember the new normal.

In short, I think people are more accepting of change than 50 years ago, but because that acceptance represents a diametric shift in "normal," it may not be a permanent acceptance.
Oh, that is an EXCELLENT point. I truly do wonder if young people today will be as forgiving toward old people as we were taught to be. I mean, if some VERY old person (like over 90) makes a racist or sexist comment, I will inwardly groan, but I won't make a "big deal" out of it (rightly or wrongly) because I realize that their attitudes are probably ingrained and/or they might have honestly forgotten that is it not okay for a man to call a woman he doesn't know "honey". But it seems to me that many (but certainly not all) of the young people today are not at all tolerant of those who do not follow the current PC culture.

Last edited by katharsis; Yesterday at 12:16 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 12:06 PM
 
4,372 posts, read 6,113,812 times
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Just go with the flow and except that change happens. Learn to bend. I had an aunt who would start every visit to my parents with, " Kids today...." I hated her guts. I recognize that I live more in my grandkids' world than that do my world. They prefer texting to calls or emails so I text. We are a peripheral generation and losing ground every day.
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Old Yesterday, 12:11 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,847 posts, read 62,941,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Yes, in many cases -- but the question I was asking is whether more people are more upset
about the changes today than they were 50 years ago.
Yes. They were also better readers back then.

The biggest difference in all these things is that there were FEWER sources of news/information
with almost everyone receiving the same WELL EDITED and RELIABLE data at the same time.
Chet Huntley and Walter Cronkite had different style... but the information was the same.
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Old Yesterday, 12:13 PM
 
1,204 posts, read 782,748 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Yes, but we were exposed to our parents, grandparents, neighbors, etc. Do you remember hearing any of the people you knew actually becoming angry and upset about the changes going on then? As I said, I don't except for long-haired hippies.

I do, however, remember MANY people getting upset about the various Presidential candidates of the time -- it seemed that many people were either very much for Nixon or very much against him! -- but just not getting outraged over social changes, like blacks and whites dating each other. (Actually, on second thought, I do remember people getting upset over busing, but not about integration in general.)

I am just wondering if my experience was different from most.

of course. someone somewhere is always upset about something. i mean, CD is clear evidence of that. such is life. we move on.

if you don't remember people being upset about social change i have to ask if you grew up in middle-middle class white suburbia (or higher class white suburbia). because, yeah.
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