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Old Yesterday, 12:15 PM
 
7,178 posts, read 1,554,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old fed View Post
of course. someone somewhere is always upset about something. i mean, CD is clear evidence of that. such is life. we move on.

if you don't remember people being upset about social change i have to ask if you grew up in middle-middle class white suburbia (or higher class white suburbia). because, yeah.
Nope, white working class (mostly blue collar). Hawthorne, California -- home of the Beach Boys.
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Old Yesterday, 12:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Yes, but we were exposed to our parents, grandparents, neighbors, etc. Do you remember hearing any of the people you knew actually becoming angry and upset about the changes going on then? As I said, I don't except for long-haired hippies.

I do, however, remember MANY people getting upset about the various Presidential candidates of the time -- it seemed that many people were either very much for Nixon or very much against him! -- but just not getting outraged over social changes, like blacks and whites dating each other. (Actually, on second thought, I do remember people getting upset over busing, but not about integration in general.)

I am just wondering if my experience was different from most.
The only thing I remember is people being outraged over the lyrics of Afternoon Delight.

'Rubbing sticks and stones together making sparks ignite and the thought of loving you is getting so exciting...."
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Old Yesterday, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
57,070 posts, read 55,345,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old fed View Post
of course. someone somewhere is always upset about something. i mean, CD is clear evidence of that. such is life. we move on.

if you don't remember people being upset about social change i have to ask if you grew up in middle-middle class white suburbia (or higher class white suburbia). because, yeah.
Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Nope, white working class. Hawthorne, California -- home of the Beach Boys.
But I grew up in white middle-class suburbia and people WERE upset!

Another thing I remember is watching the Newark riots on television and my mother telling me not to worry because that was far away. Newark was about 25 miles away, but we rarely saw any black people where we lived. I think seeing those riots on the news contributed to a lot of fear of blacks. In the years immediately following, hordes of people fled the Bronx and Newark and moved out to the burbs where I lived to get away from black faces. It didn't make them accepting or sympathetic to black peoples' conditions. It made them afraid and wanting to be far away from black people.

I grew up with mixed messages. My mother hated her father's embarrassing bigotry and taught us not to be prejudiced, but it was easy to pay that lip service in a safe, quiet, white town. When reality happened, the prejudices rose up. It's complicated.
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Old Yesterday, 12:33 PM
 
7,178 posts, read 1,554,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
But I grew up in white middle-class suburbia and people WERE upset!

Another thing I remember is watching the Newark riots on television and my mother telling me not to worry because that was far away. Newark was about 25 miles away, but we rarely saw any black people where we lived. I think seeing those riots on the news contributed to a lot of fear of blacks. In the years immediately following, hordes of people fled the Bronx and Newark and moved out to the burbs where I lived to get away from black faces. It didn't make them accepting or sympathetic to black peoples' conditions. It made them afraid and wanting to be far away from black people.
Yes, the Watts rioters came within a few blocks of our home and I remember being scared, and this was in 1965, but I don't remember any kind of permanent backlash as a result. Also,to clarify, I did encounter plenty of racists growing up, but it seems to me that no one groused about 'minorities' in "our" neighborhoods, and my dad had no problem at all getting along with blacks. In fact, if I were going to summarize the attitude as I saw it (or at least how I remember it), it was more of a "live and let live" kind of thing. ("If they don't bother me, what do I care?")

[Actually, my parents had much more of a problem with the Mexicans than they did with blacks, and the number of Mexicans greatly exceeded the number of blacks in our neighborhood, but that was due to some very bad personal experiences instead of some kind of prejudice, meaning that I honestly don't think they had any opinion of Mexicans, bad or good, until after those experiences (which I won't discuss here).]
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Old Yesterday, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Yes, the Watts rioters came within a few blocks of our home and I remember being scared, and this was in 1965, but I don't remember any kind of permanent backlash as a result. Also,to clarify, I did encounter plenty of racists growing up, but it seems to me that no one groused about 'minorities' in "our" neighborhoods, or my dad having any kind of "problem" working with blacks. In fact, if I were going to summarize the attitude as I saw it (or at least how I remember it), it was more of a "live and let live" kind of thing ("if they don't bother me, what do I care?")

[Actually, my parents had much more of a problem with the Mexicans than they did with blacks -- although the number of Mexicans far exceeded the number of blacks in our neighborhood -- but that was due to some very bad personal experiences instead of some kind of prejudice, meaning that I honestly don't think they had any opinion of Mexicans, bad or good, until after those experiences (which I won't discuss here).]
My father didn't say much at all except that "racism was stupid". He was a very logical guy, an engineer with that sort of mind, and he was right. It doesn't make any sense. He was also sort of an absent-minded professor type and didn't seem to notice if anybody was different.

As a matter of fact, my mother and sister were at odds at the time she met her husband. It had started before she met her black husband--she was married at 20 to a white guy whom she ended up mostly supporting, and she left him at 22. My mother was upset because no one had ever gotten divorced before in her family, and she was all about what others might think, and THEN my sister took up with the black man to whom she is married to this day. They didn't speak for a year or so.

Then one day my sister reached out and invited my father to come meet her husband-to-be. I'll never forget my mother waiting when he came home. She said, "Well, what happened? What is this man like?" And my father replied, "He's a nice guy. What's for dinner tonight?

He'd lost both his legs in WWII and so had an upfront and personal experience about what happens when one decides to focus their hate on a specific group, and I'm sure that led to his "it's so stupid" point of view.
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Old Yesterday, 01:42 PM
 
5,197 posts, read 2,540,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Oh, that is an EXCELLENT point. I truly do wonder if young people today will be as forgiving toward old people as we were taught to be. I mean, if some VERY old person (like over 90) makes a racist or sexist comment, I will inwardly groan, but I won't make a "big deal" out of it (rightly or wrongly) because I realize that their attitudes are probably ingrained and/or they might have honestly forgotten that is it not okay for a man to call a woman he doesn't know "honey". But it seems to me that many (not certainly not all) of the young people today are not at all tolerant of those who do not follow the current PC culture.
I agree. One of the current social changes is zero tolerance of anything that can be perceived as offensive. It seems like every day there's a news story about someone, for example, cutting the line, and it becomes a fiasco where at least one party wants to escalate it to a police investigation. The notion of de-escalating a situation seems secondary to making a statement and getting attention about being offended.

Recently, there was as story about people hiking to a waterfall. One tourist decided that someone "cut the line." I'm not sure how one does that on a hiking trail, but apparently that happened. Phones came out, verbal insults were tossed around and police were contacted. This would seem completely ridiculous 40 years ago - a joke, but today that is how it is handled - dead serious.

I think that people in the last third of their lives are going to get really mixed up about this sort of thing as they age.
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Old Yesterday, 02:17 PM
 
784 posts, read 507,720 times
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Heck, people today are upset by the color of the rugs in your bathroom, what grass you grow, or what car your drive. Somehow even those becomes a political argument. I mean, even shaving is political now (i.e. Gillette). This is all stupid.
Hyper-sensitive nosy preachy babies of all ages run rampant across the Earth these days. Never would have seen this nonsense 50 years ago. Live and let live was pretty much a universal language.
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Old Yesterday, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Idaho
1,467 posts, read 1,176,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post

So, in short, do you think that people were more accepting of change 50 years ago than they are today -- or less accepting?
IMO people are more accepting of change today than 50 years ago. Progresses on equality have accelerated at much quicker paces now than 50 years ago.

Back then, many Archie Bunkers just ranted and raved from their easy chairs in the living room, at their kitchen table, favorite pubs or coffee shops. Today, they can use their smart phones, tablets, laptops etc. to broadcast their biased opinions on twitters, facebook and internet forums.

If I am not mistaken, the OP have often visited or participated in CD's P&IO forum. That type of forum has more opinionated, bigoted or intolerant people than the general population. It's not a surprise to see the OP frequently put on a pair of rose-color nostalgic glasses ;-)
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Old Yesterday, 02:59 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,568 posts, read 3,382,110 times
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Social media and the 24/7 news cycle amplify any outrage.
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Old Yesterday, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
9,184 posts, read 7,938,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Yes. They were also better readers back then.

The biggest difference in all these things is that there were FEWER sources of news/information
with almost everyone receiving the same WELL EDITED and RELIABLE data at the same time.
Chet Huntley and Walter Cronkite had different style... but the information was the same.
I agree. To few points of view is bad but also to many can be divisive.
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