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Old 08-27-2019, 03:49 PM
 
7,036 posts, read 3,905,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
It seems to me that many older people are much more upset/angry about the changes today, than older people were 50 years ago. Yes, I can remember some older people when I was a teen grumbling about "long-haired hippies", but for the most part, I don't remember anyone I knew actually being as upset and angry about those changes as many people are about the changes today. (Yes, many people were upset about racial mixing and desegregation, but by 1970, I think most people had accepted racial integration.)

For example, the changes that occurred around 1970 included:

- Much greater acceptance of non-marital sex (and men and women openly living together without being married)
- Much greater acceptance of gays, lesbians, and bisexuals
- Very relaxed standards of dress (including long hair on men)
- Greater acceptance of interracial dating and marriage
- Antiwar demonstrations and open disrespect for those in authority

Whereas, in my opinion, the changes today are not nearly as radical as those listed above. In fact, the only things I can think of that have changed are (1) a much broader definition of what is offensive speech, (2) a drastic increase in the non-tolerance of anyone who doesn't agree with you on social and political issues, (3) widespread acceptance of transgenders and any other kind of gender or sexual identification, (4) multiple piercings and tattoos for the (mostly) young, and (5) acceptance of immigrants who want to keep their cultural heritage and not assimilate into the predominant "Anglo" culture.

So, in short, do you think that people were more accepting of change 50 years ago than they are today -- or less accepting?

(I would also like to know any of your thoughts and personal experiences related to this subject -- and also please feel free to add more items to either list and to disagree with anything I wrote!)
I remember the adults as being very upset about changes in the younger generation.

"LOVE IT OR LEAVE IT!"
"Long haired hippie...you look like a girl!"
"Long hairs - stay off the grass!"
Dirty hippie.
"You have to leave; you're not wearing a bra."

I lived in the south. There was not acceptance of interracial dating and marriage. There was not general acceptance of gays or lesbians. We never heard of bisexuals. Antiwar protesters were considered unpatriotic and should leave the country permanently. "Love it or leave it!"

Did you see the movie Easy Rider? Where the "long hairs" were attacked by the southerners, and Jack Nicholson was killed? Later, the southerners finished the job by shooting Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper.

Do you remember that the U.S. government actually killed several unarmed college students at Kent State, for peacefully protesting the war? As I recall, four unarmed college students were shot and killed...Nixon was President, I think. Two of those killed weren't even in the protest; they were walking to class. https://youtu.be/Lmd6CHah7Wg

Woodstock was considered shameful and outrageous and filthy.

No, the younger generation was regarded worse than we now regard the newer generation. But every generation has issues with the newer generation. The flappers of the 1920s were considered shocking and immoral.

I think there is more understanding and acceptance of the newer generation now than there was in the 1960s-1970s.

Last edited by bpollen; 08-27-2019 at 04:06 PM..
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:11 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,878 posts, read 62,958,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
I remember the adults as being very upset about changes in the younger generation.
Woodstock was considered shameful and outrageous and filthy.
Not by all and even fewer afterward (except that the kids got away with it)
Nope I think that most were far more like Max here (who allowed use of his dairy farm pastures).


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8eiL25BjkY
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Australia
1,063 posts, read 387,296 times
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Australia's involvement in the Vietnam war nearly tore this country apart. My parents generation generally felt we owed the US our support because of their support in WW2. The young especially resented the conscription that was introduced (even in WW1 it was rejected in referendums but no one was consulted this time) and did not see it as our business.

All the social changes such as long hair, living together before marriage, etc etc tended to be lumped with the widespread opposition to the war. Of course many older people also opposed the war. However I have never known families to be ripped apart as they were at that time.

I wanted to go to university, which here for most of us still involves living at home and commuting. My comfortably well off parents would only allow it on two conditions. Firstly I would not participate in any demonstrations, moratoriums or anything similar. Secondly, believe it or not, I would not wear blue jeans.

I bought my first pair of jeans when I married at 21. When I went in a work related demonstration when I was in my thirties, Mum commented that I had been waiting to demonstrate all those years.
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:35 PM
 
8,113 posts, read 5,157,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
- Much greater acceptance of non-marital sex (and men and women openly living together without being married)
- Much greater acceptance of gays, lesbians, and bisexuals
- Very relaxed standards of dress (including long hair on men)
- Greater acceptance of interracial dating and marriage
- Antiwar demonstrations and open disrespect for those in authority

Whereas, in my opinion, the changes today are not nearly as radical as those listed above....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I don't agree with you that the acceptance of those things occurred around 1970.
...
The changes that Katharsis outlined were indeed greater than the present ones, and the issues weightier and more transformative, than what presently we face. But none of those changes has been complete. There is still broadbased understanding that marriage is preferable to non-marriage, and that there is something sophomoric and obtuse about anti-war protests. We treat these things as guilty pleasures, as something in which to be indulged, but not as upstanding and preferable lifestyles. How many parents would encourage their daughters NOT to get married, but instead to cohabit? There is difference between tolerating something, and outright favoring it.

Indeed, I would argue that we're still debating and fighting the issues that first reached mass-consciousness in the 60s and 70s. Two generations onward, the participants are different, but the strife is much the same.
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:47 PM
 
7,036 posts, read 3,905,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Not by all and even fewer afterward (except that the kids got away with it)
Nope I think that most were far more like Max here (who allowed use of his dairy farm pastures).



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8eiL25BjkY

It was a business deal. Max got a reported $75,000 for renting out his land. His neighbors sued him for allowing the outrageous event (the local city had banned the event). Max remained persona non grata in his community for his remaining years there. He was sued for the damage caused to his neighbors' land by the concert goers.

I'm glad Woodstock was held. But I sure wouldn't have wanted it on or near land that I owned. The concert goers did a lot of damage.
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Old 08-27-2019, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Buffalo, NY
1,380 posts, read 1,239,299 times
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I remember the old folks being upset because the kids were "shooting marijuana" and "smoking LSD." ** One friend's grandfather accused us of "smoking opium."

If that's what they really meant, I guess I couldn't blame them for being upset about such things.

Recreational drug use was a really really strong dividing line between the generations 50 years ago.

(But of course that generation smoked like fiends and drank like fish)


** actual quotes from friend's parents
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Old 08-27-2019, 05:31 PM
 
18,486 posts, read 23,760,731 times
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the difference today is …….the news is everywhere and its agenda driven ... the media ....loves controversy ... in the 70's you had 3 major news outlets that's it and it was only at night after dinner..or during dinner....now its everywhere ..........news survives on tragedy ...that's how they get ratings..... so the media throws gas on any fire

if you think people are on edge...its probly because they watch the news


the 70's was a transition decade ...particularly for women...
before 1970, 80% of women did not work outside of the home..
after 1980 80% of the women did

.. and yes people were worked up ...back then ..

remember......most everyone smoked back then.......and many drank at work .....and openly drank most everywhere.. at night .. people were much less afraid of dui's

people talked more frankly/straight... didn't offend soooooo many people back then

Last edited by mainebrokerman; 08-27-2019 at 05:42 PM..
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Old 08-27-2019, 06:03 PM
Status: "cruel summer" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,766 posts, read 23,501,799 times
Reputation: 49241
Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
It seems to me that many older people are much more upset/angry about the changes today, than older people were 50 years ago. Yes, I can remember some older people when I was a teen grumbling about "long-haired hippies", but for the most part, I don't remember anyone I knew actually being as upset and angry about those changes as many people are about the changes today. (Yes, many people were upset about racial mixing and desegregation, but by 1970, I think most people had accepted racial integration.)

For example, the changes that occurred around 1970 included:

- Much greater acceptance of non-marital sex (and men and women openly living together without being married)
- Much greater acceptance of gays, lesbians, and bisexuals
- Very relaxed standards of dress (including long hair on men)
- Greater acceptance of interracial dating and marriage
- Antiwar demonstrations and open disrespect for those in authority

Whereas, in my opinion, the changes today are not nearly as radical as those listed above. In fact, the only things I can think of that have changed are (1) a much broader definition of what is offensive speech, (2) a drastic increase in the non-tolerance of anyone who doesn't agree with you on social and political issues, (3) widespread acceptance of transgenders and any other kind of gender or sexual identification, (4) multiple piercings and tattoos for the (mostly) young, and (5) acceptance of immigrants who want to keep their cultural heritage and not assimilate into the predominant "Anglo" culture.

So, in short, do you think that people were more accepting of change 50 years ago than they are today -- or less accepting?

(I would also like to know any of your thoughts and personal experiences related to this subject -- and also please feel free to add more items to either list and to disagree with anything I wrote!)
My parents were in their 30s then. They, and there friends were not particularly upset with the social changes of the 1960s or 70s. They were for civil rights and women's rights.

They were more saddened by segregation and police brutality. They didn't think long hair on men was a big deal - or jeans and other hippie attire.

Both of my parents were registered Republicans, white, college educated from the North East.

My father was more conservative, especially fiscally. My mom tended to vote Democratic in presidential elections but Republican on the local level.

If they were alive, both of them would be very disturbed by the resurgence of racism and white power groups.

They were pro-choice and we were never told abortion was wong. On the other hand, they were against living together out of wedlock. They believed Gay people were born that way.

We lived near NYC. Neither was a fan of the Trump family or their tactics.
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Old 08-27-2019, 07:40 PM
 
133 posts, read 64,124 times
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I think the difference between the 70's and now is that many of the changes then were accepted with a "to each his own" attitude. Where as now changes in culture seem to be dictated in to our lives rather than presented as another choice or option for some.
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Old 08-27-2019, 11:51 PM
 
5,197 posts, read 2,542,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srq57 View Post
I think the difference between the 70's and now is that many of the changes then were accepted with a "to each his own" attitude. Where as now changes in culture seem to be dictated in to our lives rather than presented as another choice or option for some.
I agree that our parents' generation did develop a "to each his/her own" or "live and let live" attitude about how people look/dress, homosexuality, pot and other personal preferences with the condition that people keep it to themselves. No one cares what people do in the bedroom or with their spare time, it's their business.

There seems to be a desperate urgency in the current generation to ensure that everyone knows what they're doing in the bedroom, what they look like in lingerie, how they dirty dance, what they ate for every meal and did all day long, and so on. Not only that, but they want everyone to value what they do. If they feel offended, they want everyone to join in their feelings. It's a very "me" oriented society.

Are they going to Soylent Green the generation that is forgetful, those who therefore might not mind donating themselves to climate management? How will the Me Generation deal with people who can't remember that boys might be girls, that rainbows are about homosexuality rather than a pot of gold?
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