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Old 08-28-2019, 04:06 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
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I was 13 years old and therefore oblivious to the social changes.

The youth about my own age who were involved in protesting the adults' protestations were just plain weird - on many fronts - which only supported my choice of non-involvement.
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Old 08-28-2019, 04:51 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
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I was raised in the deep South and many older people were very upset about the listed social changes 50 years ago. Several relatives, including those my age, still today do not accept gays or pre-marital sex (especially for "girls") as it is a sin in their eyes or refer to Hanoi Jane with hate. Probably do not care for interracial dating/marriage either.
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Old 08-28-2019, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Nope, white working class (mostly blue collar). Hawthorne, California -- home of the Beach Boys.
Good old Hawthorne High, I was friends with Al Jardine and Zeke who later became Chris Montez. I lived on Truro Ave, not far from the School. That was 60 years ago.
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Old 08-28-2019, 07:17 AM
 
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Not every Boomer(I assume the OP is referring to Boomers mostly) is upset about changes today.

I'm not. A primary reason is because my career in computing was a big part of these changes. Starting in 1969 and going until I retired in early 2012 my working life consisted of living with key punch machines to, ultimately, hand held devices. What a journey through time!

I'm proud of the part I played, along with all of my friends and colleagues, in making the internet viable, reliable,
and indispensable to millions of people.

Politically I'm a lot like Bernie Sanders, and always have been, although I don't always agree with him.

People who are afraid of the pace of change? They're afraid of life, imo.

To answer the initial question, very few people I was around in 1969 was upset about social changes because we wanted social change: women's rights, gay rights, etc.
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Old 08-28-2019, 07:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Yes, but we were exposed to our parents, grandparents, neighbors, etc. Do you remember hearing any of the people you knew actually becoming angry and upset about the changes going on then? As I said, I don't except for long-haired hippies.

I do, however, remember MANY people getting upset about the various Presidential candidates of the time -- it seemed that many people were either very much for Nixon or very much against him! -- but just not getting outraged over social changes, like blacks and whites dating each other. (Actually, on second thought, I do remember people getting upset over busing, but not about integration in general.)

I am just wondering if my experience was different from most.
In 1960 the voting public elected a guy who was 43 and his wife was 31. I was 10 years old. Their youth was exciting to lots of people because Eisenhower was a part of the older generation at 70 years old.

Today there seems to be some resistance wrt a generational shift in the coming presidential election. Would people have thought Mayor Pete or Tulsi G were too young 50 years ago? I don't think so. And today all of the front runners, including the president, are 70 or older.

The assassinations of RFK and MLK(and the riots that ensued after the latter's death) upset a hell of a lot of people.
Vietnam was upsetting a ton of people too.
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Old 08-28-2019, 07:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
I remember the adults as being very upset about changes in the younger generation.

"LOVE IT OR LEAVE IT!"
"Long haired hippie...you look like a girl!"
"Long hairs - stay off the grass!"
Dirty hippie.
"You have to leave; you're not wearing a bra."

I lived in the south. There was not acceptance of interracial dating and marriage. There was not general acceptance of gays or lesbians. We never heard of bisexuals. Antiwar protesters were considered unpatriotic and should leave the country permanently. "Love it or leave it!"

Did you see the movie Easy Rider? Where the "long hairs" were attacked by the southerners, and Jack Nicholson was killed? Later, the southerners finished the job by shooting Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper.

Do you remember that the U.S. government actually killed several unarmed college students at Kent State, for peacefully protesting the war? As I recall, four unarmed college students were shot and killed...Nixon was President, I think. Two of those killed weren't even in the protest; they were walking to class. https://youtu.be/Lmd6CHah7Wg

Woodstock was considered shameful and outrageous and filthy.

No, the younger generation was regarded worse than we now regard the newer generation. But every generation has issues with the newer generation. The flappers of the 1920s were considered shocking and immoral.

I think there is more understanding and acceptance of the newer generation now than there was in the 1960s-1970s.
Of course interracial marriage was not accepted in the south since it was illegal until 1967.
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Old 08-28-2019, 08:18 AM
 
622 posts, read 1,008,652 times
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Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Of course interracial marriage was not accepted in the south since it was illegal until 1967.
It wasn't even accepted by a majority of Americans until the 90s.


Think about that, just 30 years ago more than 50% of Americans were against interracial marriage. People still complain today about interracial couples on tv, it's crazy how slow the country has been when it comes to racial issues despite it being in your face for so long.
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Old 08-28-2019, 08:39 AM
 
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And to put it all into perspective, “Americans” are about 4% of the world's population.
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Old 08-28-2019, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,189 posts, read 18,015,690 times
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I think Trump sets the ignition in a way other presidents haven't. Like him or hate him, he, as a man, has become the center of the nation. LBJ and Nixon never dominated things the way Trump does.
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Old 08-28-2019, 09:55 AM
 
Location: NYC
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(Trying to be brief on a complex subject): I think the difference in anger between 1969 & 2019 is that the older generation then were products of the Great Depression & WWII, widespread shared hardship & sacrifice over many years. Yes, they were often upset, sometimes very angry, or against various societal changes/attitudes from the following generation (us). But those years of shared sacrifice instilled in them a deep belief that at the end of the day they were all "united" & compromised & moved on. That's what I think anyway.

Today the older generation (us), don't have that shared passage of great sacrifice & in fact our early adult passage saw us self identify with "tribes": silent majority, counter culture, traditional/religious, university educated/mobile, etc... And I see that tribalization hardening now rather than being open to compromise. The Constitution's ".... more perfect union" seems to be co-opted now by groups self-described as "real Americans" & other identity politics that posit countrymen as evil or bad & therefore not worthy of conferring & compromising with. Another difference I see is that it's not necessarily directed at the younger generation but anyone not "on my team".

I find it deeply troubling & not sure how/if it will be bridged.
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