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Old 08-31-2019, 09:43 AM
 
14,475 posts, read 7,754,627 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dustyroad70 View Post
I've seen a few good nursing homes that happen to accept Medicaid.

They can't possibly accept all of them and maintain any kind of standard for care. Generally, a good nursing home will take a private pay patient gambling that they won't be a Medicaid conversion or at least won't be a Medicaid patient for very long.


The point of this thread is where you're living independently, are disabled to the point where you can't cook/eat/wash dishes, and aren't sufficiently disabled to need skilled nursing. Every state has "medically necessary" eligibility rules. Particularly in red states, it's pretty easy to end up in no-mans land where you're not eligible for Medicaid for a nursing home and there is no funding for at-home programs to care for you.

 
Old 08-31-2019, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,493 posts, read 12,126,944 times
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I volunteer at a food bank. I don't know specific numbers, but I can say that a sizable percentage of our participants are seniors. In a lot of cases, they have their adult children and/or their grandchildren living with them. Even if they have Social Security and/or another source of retirement income, it doesn't go far enough to support a household of that size.

We do not require any financial verification, so anyone who feels they need the support is welcome to make an appointment and come shop in our market. I regularly tell people that it's ok to come even if they have money coming in, because if we can help them out with a week's worth of food, it frees up that money to pay the electric bill or some other necessary expense.
 
Old 08-31-2019, 10:17 AM
 
657 posts, read 140,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Particularly in red states, it's pretty easy to end up in no-mans land where you're not eligible for Medicaid for a nursing home and there is no funding for at-home programs to care for you.
Do you have any statistics showing this or an article? I'll check it out.
 
Old 08-31-2019, 10:24 AM
 
657 posts, read 140,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
I volunteer at a food bank..
What do the clients actually want from a food bank? What do they actually get?
 
Old 08-31-2019, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,493 posts, read 12,126,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StrawberrySoup View Post
What do the clients actually want from a food bank? What do they actually get?
The one I volunteer at is a market model - we have a small supermarket area which includes fresh fruits and vegetables (some of which we grow ourselves). Participants can select the items they and their family like. We do have to put some limits on meat given that we have lower supply of it, but otherwise, they can take as much as they want - we ask them to take what their household needs for a week.

I know there are other food banks that make up preselected boxes of food, but I think this is a much, much better approach.

We also have cooking classes and healthy eating programming for things like diabetes.
 
Old 08-31-2019, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,632 posts, read 1,686,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StrawberrySoup View Post
What do the clients actually want from a food bank? What do they actually get?
I volunteer at a food bank too. I even used a food bank once, when I lost my job, but my unemployment benefits weren't due to start until two weeks later.

Every food bank is different, but the one I volunteer at works like this: you assemble a box set of foods based on the USDA MyPlate. Each box contains starches (bread, rice, cereal, and dry pasta), vegetables (fresh, canned, or pickled), fruits (fresh or canned), animal proteins (canned chicken and tuna), and non-perishable milk. Once assembled, the boxes are sealed and labeled.

The food bank I used works this way. I called to schedule a pick-up visit; they asked me about allergies and foods I don't eat. When I came, they gave me an assembled box of canned and frozen foods. Most were pretty basic, understandably. But there was also a little bit of fancy stuff, like brie cheese. (Beats me why stores rejected it; it was fine.) That was when I rediscovered how good canned mackerel was.

What do clients want? I very happy with what I was given. The volunteer handing me the box told me about cooking seminars at the food bank, but I declined, since I already knew how to cook, and he believed me.
 
Old 08-31-2019, 11:07 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
212 posts, read 194,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
Sorry, but I dont buy the food insecurity schtick. First, there is social security and welfare food stamps meals on wheels and various free food offers from others. Many cities also have food pantries with free food. We had one in Lubbock Tx. They had so much money they were paying kids in summer to come and be paid and taught how to grow food.

If these people are shut ins (cant get out of their house on their own) family needs to take them in or be put in nursing home or some assisted living arrangement. Maybe the local govt could take over and then bill the family. I've seen situations where the children of the elderly completely shirk their duty.
I have to disagree with some of these statements. Your overall post lists many generalizations that assume folks have easy access to these. True, people can get social security. For some it is adequate, but for others, it is barely enough to make a living. Food stamps help, but often it is not enough to cover even basic food needs. You don't take into account that some people get into situations that are or were beyond their control. Ex.: I was a working single mother for awhile. Very difficult to manage back then.


As far as family, this is great if they live close by. Even then, they don't always participate. Many grown children must live where their jobs are, thus making hands on care difficult to do for their parents. Its true, some could have their folks live with them, but this is not always possible. Assisting Living is a possibility, but also very expensive, the same with Nursing Homes.


I live in SWFL. Fortunately, we are luck to have numerous food pantries. I volunteer at one of them and believe me, we hand out tons of food. I don't know much about Meals on Wheels as I don't volunteer for it. I am truly blessed to live here where we have so much support. However, I also know that some people have difficulty even getting to these places. I am just saying that it can be difficult to understand these situations unless you have experienced them.
 
Old 08-31-2019, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,568 posts, read 12,746,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post
Meals on wheels is income based. I know many well off that get them and they pay accordingly. Without them the program couldn't survive.
It may vary by location, but when my mother became unable to prepare her own meals because of advancing age, we looked into it. Meals On Wheels would not deliver to rural locations, and the meals cost about what a restaurant meal would cost. They did not accept food stamps.
 
Old 08-31-2019, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,568 posts, read 12,746,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curly Q. Bobalink View Post
I do NOT expect the Gub'mint to send someone to my home five days a week to make sure I'm washed, fed, and tucked in at night. When I can no longer do those things for myself (and having no children to support me), it will be time to go. With no whining necessary, please. The idea that we can all live trouble-free to age 90 is complete fantasy, and will NEVER happen, at least not with the choices most of us make on a daily basis (for example, to watch a re-run of Gilligan's Island after dinner instead of walking a mile). Again, make bad choices in life, get bad results. Can one make good choices, and still get bad results? Absolutely, bad luck (and genetics) can always turn the dice up snake-eyes. but for the most part, for most people, that's not how it works.
And there it is. The conclusion is that anyone who can't care for themselves should have the decency to die.
 
Old 08-31-2019, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Metropolis IL
1,626 posts, read 1,919,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
I'm the transportation for my 79 y/o uncle who went bust in the financial collapse a decade ago. He's living on next to nothing, but gets ~$150 month ($5/d) from the fed food stamps program.


6 oz of ground beef (~$1) 2 eggs (~$0.15) a potato (~$0.20) and a couple slices of bread (~$0.10) gives him all the protein and most of the vits & mins he needs. The other $3.55 can go to DingDongs or YoHos or whatever he wants to fill in the calorie requirement.(Check your favorite nutrition site if you don't believe me.)


No need for anyone in this country to go undernourished. Loneliness is a big problem tho. We need more family and less govt. Maybe church youth groups, Scouts and 4H organizations could get involved. (Even Seinfeld, Elaine & George once volunteered to befriend the elderly.)


BTW- I'm trying to develop a strain of grape to make a wine that will go well with cat food & crackers. The elderly shouldn't have to miss out on the finer things in life.
I'd like to know how the 79 year old uncle ended up living on next to nothing. The financial collapse of the markets a decade ago, affecting him that much, indicates at age 69 he had a considerable amount of money invested. Unless he acquired the money decades ago, and retired very early with little SS earnings, he had to earn that money and pay FICA taxes. His SS check should be well above the amount that is allowed to qualify for food stamps.

That's the whole idea behind working 30 plus years, and paying into SS. If all else fails, you have a SS and Medicare benefit sufficient enough to provide for the essentials of life. If one qualifies for other non-senior related programs, it generally means they didn't spend enough years in the workforce.
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