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Old 09-02-2019, 07:53 AM
 
2,509 posts, read 887,391 times
Reputation: 6379

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
My health insurance provider throws a tape measure around each of us every year as part of our annual biometric exam. You aren't REQUIRED to get the exam, but you get incentive dollars toward co-pays and deductibles if you do. You also get incentives for exercise and working with a health coach. I don't mind at all because I am a very self-motivated person, but I wonder if this program is having an impact on the overall health of the insured......Americans DO need to take more responsibility for their own health and if that means the insurance company needs to prod them a bit, I think that is okay.
I had that with my last employer and I'd like to see more of it. I ended up with a computer from all the Amazon credits I got as incentives!

I think one drawback for most plans is that so much of the impact is very long-term. A slightly overweight 35-year old with a diet of processed foods may not cost the system very much right now. If you give him/her incentives to get active, eat healthier and lose weight, the real payoff might come 30 years later. My employer had done studies indicating that people who were "engaged" in the program (measured by a minimum level of points from healthy behaviors) had lower costs than those who weren't, but that's a chicken-or-egg question. The "engaged" includes people who are motivated to change or continue healthy behaviors. The "non-engaged" are those who have given up on losing weight, quitting smoking, etc. so of course they have higher costs. Two different populations.

 
Old 09-02-2019, 07:58 AM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,176 posts, read 3,318,749 times
Reputation: 8463
Reminds me one time I jokingly said to a 60+ year old female who was retired "There's always food stamps" Her response was a vehement "I'D RATHER STARVE" So I guess there's a lot of prideful people out there.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 08:35 AM
 
657 posts, read 138,658 times
Reputation: 874
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
Just to insert a random bit of advice....there are some great gadgets out there to help with opening jars. I own this one and also bought it for my mom when she was alive. https://www.amazon.com/OXO-Good-Grip...TAEX5617X75G4P. I also bought some produce keepers so fresh items could last longer. My mom had stopped buying lettuce because "it always goes bad before I finish it." She appreciated this item: https://www.amazon.com/Solutions-Pro...n%2C166&sr=1-2. It made her more willing to buy something fresh if she knew it wouldn't go to waste. For seniors who live alone, being able to open jars or have produce last a couple of extra days can be very helpful.
I bought my wife one each of these:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002YYMMUG/

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000CO256G

That first one especially is absolutely GD brilliant.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 08:46 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,998 posts, read 6,699,167 times
Reputation: 10654
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sibay View Post
That poster was correct.

Someone with the ability to purchase food is more likely to eat healthy than the person who gets their lunch from a dumpster wouldn't you agree?
Strawman argument. Food or dumpster. When I was poor, I survived on peanut butter and jelly sandwich, with an apple for lunch, daily basis for at least a year. It didn’t cost much. My mom made sphagetti for dinner almost every day. I don’t recall we had chicken ever. There are ways to eat cheaply. I agree with a poster who said this is care issue more than hunger issue.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 09-02-2019 at 08:55 AM..
 
Old 09-02-2019, 08:51 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,998 posts, read 6,699,167 times
Reputation: 10654
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
Thanks for this- it was a real eye-opener. You'd mentioned dental issues and that's one of which I'm acutely aware because I know people with ill-fitting dentures. It affects your entire life (uncomfortable even to watch them talk as the dentures shifted) and limits what you can eat. All the crispy, crunchy veggies they tell you are good for you (and the cheaper cuts of meat, which may be tougher) are out of the question.

I talked to my Dad last night- he's in Independent Living and is considering moving to another facility nearby. The service in the place he's in, he says, isn't great. I told him this is common; there's a huge demand for people working with the aged but they don't get paid very well. The new facility may not be that much different. Still, I told him (as I've told him repeatedly) that I am profoundly grateful he can make those choices.
My dad only had 3 teeth left when he was in nursing home. He still was able to eat, he used his gum. I think those were not his real teeth either, but they were not dentures.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 08:58 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,998 posts, read 6,699,167 times
Reputation: 10654
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
My health insurance provider throws a tape measure around each of us every year as part of our annual biometric exam. You aren't REQUIRED to get the exam, but you get incentive dollars toward co-pays and deductibles if you do. You also get incentives for exercise and working with a health coach. I don't mind at all because I am a very self-motivated person, but I wonder if this program is having an impact on the overall health of the insured......Americans DO need to take more responsibility for their own health and if that means the insurance company needs to prod them a bit, I think that is okay.
True. Iíve been prodding my kids to exercise since they were no longer under my roof, one finally took notice. The other one hasnít. Plus she has a boyfriend who plays video game on top of sitting 8 hours at work. Somehow I know if they keep up with that life restyle they will be sick.
I donít sleep well on days that I didnít exercise. Everything ties together.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 10:09 AM
 
92 posts, read 15,708 times
Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by StrawberrySoup View Post
Of course not. Homeless people from outside the town move in. The ones who are there don't leave.

You'd be surprised how many bus tickets local governments hand out.

Ok good. That is not what you said to Galaxyhi. So we've established "Feeding the homeless doesn't lead to more homeless". All it does, after you clarified, is draw already homeless people from out of the area. That I can agree with

Last edited by SaraR.; 09-02-2019 at 10:50 AM..
 
Old 09-02-2019, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,472 posts, read 666,715 times
Reputation: 3443
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
I had that with my last employer and I'd like to see more of it. I ended up with a computer from all the Amazon credits I got as incentives!

I think one drawback for most plans is that so much of the impact is very long-term. A slightly overweight 35-year old with a diet of processed foods may not cost the system very much right now. If you give him/her incentives to get active, eat healthier and lose weight, the real payoff might come 30 years later. My employer had done studies indicating that people who were "engaged" in the program (measured by a minimum level of points from healthy behaviors) had lower costs than those who weren't, but that's a chicken-or-egg question. The "engaged" includes people who are motivated to change or continue healthy behaviors. The "non-engaged" are those who have given up on losing weight, quitting smoking, etc. so of course they have higher costs. Two different populations.
Our program amounts to a total of $480 a year if you fulfill all of the requirements.....double if you have a spouse on the plan. And it carries over, so I am a single person and I have over $3,000 in my account to be applied to co-pays and deductibles. It is shocking to me how many of the employees do not bother with the program and leave this money on the table....but then they complain if our premiums go up. So, yes, it is somewhat self-selected....chicken/egg.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 10:49 AM
 
92 posts, read 15,708 times
Reputation: 86
Someone already posted the huge variations within food pantries. We currently live in a rich area, we will be moving to a poor area to better live within our means

The poor town gets the leftovers from the food bank due to the long drive there and back. But they are blessed to get anything and that a volunteer is willing to drive the food truck up there.

They get a TON of NON PERISHABLE Food. A few months a year, they get almost nothing, it depends. Last time it was a crate full of ONIONS & POTATOES. They also got PASTA, CANNED GREEN BEANS & CORN. About 50% of the time there is additional peanut butter, rice, diced tomatoes, kidney beans or tomato sauce. About 2x a year, they'll get snacks like cereal, dried fruits, once they even got a bag of almonds which are expensive. NO MEAT WHATSOEVER, OR REFRIDGERATED ITEMS.

It's dropped off in front of the only commercial building, a one way street into this tiny town with only a tiny store/restaurant. We stopped to chat and they offered for us to take some of it, no way can 30 people eat a whole crate full of onions & potatoes.

We took some of the onions & potatoes since it would surely go to waste.

They encouraged us to sign up but we don't qualify for the food pantry. We may choose to take some of the leftover food if it is going to waste or use it to make community meals for everyone. The restaurant has donated her time and efforts to make XMAS & THANKSGIVING meals for everyone using much of the food pantries food.

Last edited by SaraR.; 09-02-2019 at 10:59 AM..
 
Old 09-02-2019, 10:51 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,955 posts, read 3,847,702 times
Reputation: 13100
Food packaging and pricing are a problem. I'm not hard up or scrimping to buy food or going hungry but I stop and look at the "manager's specials" bin at the meat counter and pick up something that is significantly discounted for my evening supper or to go into a stew pot. (Maybe I should leave that for others more needy?)

I live alone and have no use for costly family size packages of fifteen pork steaks or a huge family size roast. I won't eat that much and can't keep it. Small packages that might yield one or two meals are more expensive than the hulking family size if you figure per meal cost. As it is I buy more than I can use and then have to go on a salvage cooking binge. Even then I end up tossing some of it if it sits in the refrigerator for ten days. My parents grew up in the depression and were better at stretching things and being inventive.
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