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Old 09-02-2019, 03:26 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,999 posts, read 6,699,167 times
Reputation: 10654

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
How do you manage your diabetes on $196/month?
Food wise, you eat lots of vegetables. I had a roommate who was too poor to afford meat, all she had was steamed vegetables and she sautéed them with salt and pepper. That’s how. I buy boat loads of vegetables every week for about $20-$25. Add in egg for protein and maybe nuts like peanut butter.
Of course, food is different from medicine, let’s not confuse the two.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...t/art-20044295

 
Old 09-02-2019, 03:45 PM
 
11,363 posts, read 8,606,604 times
Reputation: 20656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sibay View Post
Should I ever find myself in that situation it would be really difficult for me to accept help. Too much pride to admit defeat I guess, so I understand those who don't but wow...It's a sobering reminder of how bad things are for some people.
Sometimes accepting help is a blessing for the helper. Please learn to say yes.

I gave a ride to a couple of Pacific Crest Trail hikers. They taught me something that they were taught. When someone offers you something, try to always say yes. You never know what great things you will see.

So when I offered them lunch at the nearby town they were happy to accompany me. It was such a great day! They called me a Trail Angel.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Mount Pleasant, SC
1,968 posts, read 2,504,355 times
Reputation: 1737
Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
I've seen situations where the children of the elderly completely shirk their duty.
Yes ... you can't legislate that "the children" do so. And then "the elderly" you abandon them like their children have?!?
 
Old 09-02-2019, 04:36 PM
 
736 posts, read 224,421 times
Reputation: 1855
The meals are put in the freezer and microwaved or heated in the oven. Of course they aren’t delivered daily. They rely on volunteers. If you are poor enough you don’t pay. Sliding scale fee. They also bring a few other things like milk. This service was priceless for my friends.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 07:11 PM
 
92 posts, read 15,708 times
Reputation: 86
When I lived in Southern Calif 3 yrs ago, there were plenty of resources for the poor and the food was CHEAP!!!

We ate at Whole Foods many times yet the prices at the closest Whole Foods now is 3x that.

It matters where you live.


Our water bill was 50% less in Southern Calif vs Northern YET it is Northern Calif which supplies their water!

These prices spouted here for veges are so cheap it's hard to comprehend

We pay about 3x that.



The poor have no money to move either so people surely do almost starve in our area. So sad.

Move to the poor off grid town we are, within this expensive county, and don't expect healthy food

from the food pantry. Just be appreciative they are willing to bring any food at all!


Amazing all what people buy here for under $200 a month.

We are very cheap folks who are now going off grid (can you get any less expensive?) to live


Learning to process our own meat for dogfood and ourselves




Anyhow No reason why we cannot be supplying the poor with a basic, low level of healthcare.

As research proves, it saves the taxpayer $ due to lower healthcare costs

And then we'll all be able to look ourselves in the mirror each day

Last edited by SaraR.; 09-02-2019 at 08:00 PM..
 
Old 09-02-2019, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,558 posts, read 2,850,808 times
Reputation: 16874
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgustedman View Post
Reminds me one time I jokingly said to a 60+ year old female who was retired "There's always food stamps" Her response was a vehement "I'D RATHER STARVE" So I guess there's a lot of prideful people out there.
It took me forever to apply for food stamps because I was so ashamed. It was worse when I wasn't familiar with what to buy and tried to buy paper towels with them once, and the cashier remarked, "That's why they're called food stamps." I about sunk into the floor.

Then came my aneurysm and while taking meds for that, I had to abstain from acid reflux meds for 6 months. Talk about being sick! The only thing (and the cheapest thing) that would help was carbonated soda. So for six months I bought 12 paks of orange, root beer, 7-Up, and ginger ale soda on food stamps. You can only imagine how that went over with other people. I was so sick that even with all that sugar, I still lost weight (not a method I'd recommend, though).


Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Food packaging and pricing are a problem. I'm not hard up or scrimping to buy food or going hungry but I stop and look at the "manager's specials" bin at the meat counter and pick up something that is significantly discounted for my evening supper or to go into a stew pot. (Maybe I should leave that for others more needy?)

I live alone and have no use for costly family size packages of fifteen pork steaks or a huge family size roast. I won't eat that much and can't keep it. Small packages that might yield one or two meals are more expensive than the hulking family size if you figure per meal cost. As it is I buy more than I can use and then have to go on a salvage cooking binge. Even then I end up tossing some of it if it sits in the refrigerator for ten days. My parents grew up in the depression and were better at stretching things and being inventive.
When I come home from the store, it's time to sort the meat. I just hate doing that, but I have to. I buy a ten pound roll of hamburger and cut it up into 8 one and a quarter pound portions. Pork gets cut up, chicken breasts get trimmed and bagged separately and if I get the three pound packages of bacon on sale, I separate it into 3 one pound packages. Hot dogs get separated into freezer bags, two to a bag. Chicken legs get divided into freezer bags, three or four to a bag, depending on how large they are. They used to have petite sirloins on sale and I would bag each steak separately (haven't seen those on sale for over a year now, though). But everything gets frozen.

Onions go into the vegetable drawer (they keep longer). Bread lives in the fridge. Potatoes, lettuce, and corn need to be eaten right away, so meals are planned around that. If I get fresh fruit from the farmer's market, everything I can't eat in one day is frozen.

If I make anything with potatoes, beans, or hamburger in a large amount, it can be frozen in portions. I have a huge problem with milk and eggs. Sometimes I run short and other times they go bad before I can use them. If the cream I buy gets close to the expiration day, I make that into butter. I generally buy butter on sale, though, and freeze what I can't use right away.

The only good thing to all this is I can eat the same thing a couple days in a row and it doesn't bother me.

When I move out into my car and don't have a freezer, my diet is going to go to he!!.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
Who are these poor people, are they homeless. I can eat well on $196 a month here. Yesterday I bought 8-12 pieces of drum sticks for a little about $2. I made fried chicken on my BBQ, not deep fried. That would last me at least 6 meals. I freeze my food too.
My budget is expensive because I eat a lot of fresh wild fish. But if I’m poor, canned salmon can be had for cheap, the one I bought from Sprouts should last me for at least 2 meals. No cooking is necessary. I cook rice every 2-3 days, then heat them up. If you are too lazy to make rice, buy it from a Chinese take out. There are ways to stretch your budget. Poor people are much smarter than we give them credit. It’s usually the rich here, as in not poor, discuss how hard it is for poor people to stretch the budget because they never done it. If you are poor all your life, you’ll learn quickly.
I ate well on $194 a month, but I lived inside with my utilities paid for, I had a stove, an oven, a fridge, and a freezer, and I also had a car to use for shopping. A lot of people don't have that luxury. I'm disabled, so I also have time, something many people who work two and three jobs don't have.

I also have a place to store my spices, I was able to buy a good set of pots and pans on Craig's List (and travel 60 miles to pick them up), a friend gave me a set of silverware for Christmas, and I was able to find a dish set for $1 a piece at a thrift store. These are also luxuries not everyone has.

Keep in mind that even if a homeless person has food stamps, you can't buy hot food with them. So a homeless person or someone who has no way of heating food up won't be able to buy those rotisserie chickens or the hot food in the deli cases at the grocery stores or get to-go orders at places that accept food stamps.

I've always been poor, I'm poor now, and I'm telling you flat out that if a person lacks the essentials to cook with, even if food is available, it will be difficult for them to do anything with it to stretch their budget. I've lived in my car and kept hamburger out for a couple days without a cooler (in summer) to have several meals, but is that something you would recommend?
 
Old 09-02-2019, 07:32 PM
 
6,540 posts, read 5,228,547 times
Reputation: 13478
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post

Onions go into the vegetable drawer (they keep longer). Bread lives in the fridge. Potatoes, lettuce, and corn need to be eaten right away, so meals are planned around that. If I get fresh fruit from the farmer's market, everything I can't eat in one day is frozen.

If I make anything with potatoes, beans, or hamburger in a large amount, it can be frozen in portions. I have a huge problem with milk and eggs. Sometimes I run short and other times they go bad before I can use them. If the cream I buy gets close to the expiration day, I make that into butter. I generally buy butter on sale, though, and freeze what I can't use right away.
You can store your potatoes in the fridge. They will last a long time.

I do that with mine. The growers store them in refrigerators for a while also. Varieties have changed/improved and they won't go bad.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 07:59 PM
 
736 posts, read 224,421 times
Reputation: 1855
Rosen, I would never say a thing to people using food stamps because no one knows their situation. You definitely needed that soda. That’s the only thing that helps me when nauseous. The 2 of us live well spending 400/month for groceries. We have frequent guests. Just depends on how expensive food is where you live.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Upper Left Hand Corner
2,749 posts, read 1,026,312 times
Reputation: 4542
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
Detractors for what. Stop your BS. Of course SNAP doesn’t care or doesn’t know. She obviously has milked the system. She was on financial aid. The state of California paid for her college tuition. If you are on free food, beer is not food. It’s entertainment. Maybe we should have a thread about entertainment insecurity.
At any rate, nobody can buy beer with SNAP, or any other non food item, impossible. The computer program at checkout won't accept it. The non food items are sorted out automatically when you use your SNAP card. then you pay the remaining balance with the usual methods. She has some other income she buys beer with. It's that simple. I pay for my cheapest possible beer with my SS by debit card after I run my SNAP card first.
 
Old 09-02-2019, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Upper Left Hand Corner
2,749 posts, read 1,026,312 times
Reputation: 4542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
No, humans set up the system. It may come as a surprise to you, but Christians don't charge for their food pantries or require income statements. They figure if Jesus didn't charge to feed the 5,000 they shouldn't either. Talk to one sometime. You will be astonished to find that Christians care for their fellow human beings and don't condemn them to starve to death.
Excellent post, thank you.
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