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Old 08-30-2019, 12:06 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,258 posts, read 2,076,250 times
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My father retired at 55. Both his parents died in their early 60's and he wanted a few years without working. He died at 95, almost 96. He was not sedentary in his retirement years which probably helped.
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Old 08-30-2019, 02:41 PM
 
7,088 posts, read 3,928,961 times
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You live longer if you retire early. https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/27/how-...ire-early.html

A 2017 study...Dutch males. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28233361

Also, a study in Sweden: " our estimations show that those continuing to work after 65 on average display a 6.8% higher probability of reporting better health during retirement than those leaving at the age of 65. However, we find that this positive correlation between the extension of working life and health is only transitory. After 6 years of retirement, the health advantage of working after the normal retirement age disappears." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30191342

There's an article in Forbes, too, reporting on the same conclusion. If you want to live longer, retire early.
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:55 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,506 posts, read 1,730,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
My father retired at 55. Both his parents died in their early 60's and he wanted a few years without working. He died at 95, almost 96. He was not sedentary in his retirement years which probably helped.
My Dad worked in a factory with a union job for a large corporation. He retired at 57 and died at age 92. He was cutting the grass three weeks before he died. He took pleasure in the fact that he was retired longer than he worked. He was always busy physically and mentally. He was proud of the projects he worked on, but work never defined him. He was so much more and his retirement reflected that.
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Old 08-30-2019, 07:41 PM
 
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My mother’s companion worked for 28 years for the City of Los Angeles and retired at 55, back in the 1970s. At 95, he’s still going strong.
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Old 08-30-2019, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,252 posts, read 18,067,064 times
Reputation: 28518
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
According to this study albeit a bit dated the research shows a connection between longevity and later retirement. The data shows just one healthy adult retiring just one year later in life resulted in an 11% less likely chance of morality, and that's an all-cause death meaning the type of death didn't matter these individuals lived on average 11% longer. To me 11% is astounding to witness in just a single year. Just thinking about it logically this makes sense as we live in the world where many of our internal motivations become dependent on things that ultimately aren't needed to live i.e. a job, that these actually physically push us in old age. Seems like those who have something to live for specifically a job actually live longer. I think it's a remarkable example of the power of the human mind over the bodies in winch we inhibit, and their longevity depending on a mental drive. A drive that's more social than anything in a job we socially align ourselves to something bigger than ourselves to achieve goals that have little impact on our individual lives, but brings improvement to society as a whole for the most part at least. Just curious have retirees examined this phenomenon in real life or has it been the contrary of one's longer lofe being hindered by prolonged working years, and could you include the working conditions and whether they themselves were the cause and shouldn't be filled with seniors.

Seeing that people are living longer it looks like we have a ton of extra senior support labor just waiting to be harnessed. Winch has been hindered by our history of work conditions winch we've grown used to as a necessary sacrifice not something we'd willing do for the rest of our life. It's been well documented that this senior workforce is one of the key drivers, if not the biggest driver behind our long period of sustained economic growth. It seems that economists have overlooked it, as we always have rendering our future economic predictions as false as they've never included the potential of the folks that have pretty much created the jobs and systems we work with today returning to the workforce to pick up the slack. I think it's an awesome way that we can also change the narrative of folks not expecting to retire on well funded pensions as something that's totally bad and the standard for a fufilling life as a Senior. Besides I think of pentions as mostly being a useful catalyst for economic growth without them many industries definitely wouldn't be where they are today. This can be a super beneficial asset for a society with a disproportionate abundance of seniors to youth ratio.

Again most of our modern day systems can be mostly traced back to our seniors giving them an abundance of priceless knowledge that youth simply can't bring to the table. If one isn't broken I see no reason why one would think you absolutely have to retire fully a part time job sharing your expertise with younger individuals offers a better more fufilling retirement that invests in your country for years to come. It's almost inevitable with worldwide advancements that by 2100 the years of high growth Will be completely behind us as we start to shrink to less populous more balanced species that we we'll need to work, and think innovatively and creatively in a way that we're simply not used to. To make the best of the adjusting years until an equilibrium is achieved. https://psmag.com/news/retire-early-die-early
I don't think this means what you think it does.

Many times, early retirees do so for health reasons. That spouse is more likely to die than a healthier spouse who may continue working. Retirement itself has little to do with it.
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Old 08-31-2019, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,531 posts, read 4,265,669 times
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In every job or career there is an element of stress. Some people thrive on it but I think most don't. The trick is to recognize when the stress is harmful. Most of us don’t realize the stress was there until we shed it by retiring. I retired a little over two years ago, and I am glad I did. My career was defining my life, and it was a barrier to relationships with family members.
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Old 09-01-2019, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
22,532 posts, read 14,800,936 times
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I am alive at 72. I retired almost 13 years ago. DH is alive at the age of 77, after retiring at the age of 65.

We know people in their 70s and 80s who retired young.

People should do what is best for themselves. And sometimes people lose jobs at a fairly early age and simply cannot get hired because of agism. They are then forced to retire.
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Old 09-01-2019, 06:13 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,926 posts, read 7,198,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
The data shows just one healthy adult retiring just one year later in life resulted in an 11% less likely chance of morality.

1) I assume you mean "mortality" instead of morality.

2) mortality rate is the same for everyone --100%. I guess you meant 11% longer life. But does that apply to the entire life span, or just retirement years? For instance, 11% of 60 years is 6.6 years. 11% of 20 years of retirement is 2.2 years. And you'd be working for one of those years.
LOL, I don't know if "morality" lengthens the lifespan, or just makes it seem longer.
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Old 09-01-2019, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
8,519 posts, read 9,284,657 times
Reputation: 13410
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
According to this study albeit a bit dated the research shows a connection between longevity and later retirement. The data shows just one healthy adult retiring just one year later in life resulted in an 11% less likely chance of morality,
I'm in a bad mood today and frankly I'm sick of these kind statements. So if I retired a year later than I did I only have only have a 89% chance of dying??? Last time I checked we all have a 100% of dying!

Geez, last week I read an article that said people who drink diet sodas have a 16% higher risk of dying (actual wording) than those who do not. Really???

Let's be more precise in what we mean to say. End of rant.
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Old 09-01-2019, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
32,512 posts, read 20,473,973 times
Reputation: 46918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
LOL, I don't know if "morality" lengthens the lifespan, or just makes it seem longer.

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