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Old Yesterday, 06:48 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,805 posts, read 2,620,853 times
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According to this study albeit a bit dated the research shows a connection between longevity and later retirement. The data shows just one healthy adult retiring just one year later in life resulted in an 11% less likely chance of morality, and that's an all-cause death meaning the type of death didn't matter these individuals lived on average 11% longer. To me 11% is astounding to witness in just a single year. Just thinking about it logically this makes sense as we live in the world where many of our internal motivations become dependent on things that ultimately aren't needed to live i.e. a job, that these actually physically push us in old age. Seems like those who have something to live for specifically a job actually live longer. I think it's a remarkable example of the power of the human mind over the bodies in winch we inhibit, and their longevity depending on a mental drive. A drive that's more social than anything in a job we socially align ourselves to something bigger than ourselves to achieve goals that have little impact on our individual lives, but brings improvement to society as a whole for the most part at least. Just curious have retirees examined this phenomenon in real life or has it been the contrary of one's longer lofe being hindered by prolonged working years, and could you include the working conditions and whether they themselves were the cause and shouldn't be filled with seniors.

Seeing that people are living longer it looks like we have a ton of extra senior support labor just waiting to be harnessed. Winch has been hindered by our history of work conditions winch we've grown used to as a necessary sacrifice not something we'd willing do for the rest of our life. It's been well documented that this senior workforce is one of the key drivers, if not the biggest driver behind our long period of sustained economic growth. It seems that economists have overlooked it, as we always have rendering our future economic predictions as false as they've never included the potential of the folks that have pretty much created the jobs and systems we work with today returning to the workforce to pick up the slack. I think it's an awesome way that we can also change the narrative of folks not expecting to retire on well funded pensions as something that's totally bad and the standard for a fufilling life as a Senior. Besides I think of pentions as mostly being a useful catalyst for economic growth without them many industries definitely wouldn't be where they are today. This can be a super beneficial asset for a society with a disproportionate abundance of seniors to youth ratio.

Again most of our modern day systems can be mostly traced back to our seniors giving them an abundance of priceless knowledge that youth simply can't bring to the table. If one isn't broken I see no reason why one would think you absolutely have to retire fully a part time job sharing your expertise with younger individuals offers a better more fufilling retirement that invests in your country for years to come. It's almost inevitable with worldwide advancements that by 2100 the years of high growth Will be completely behind us as we start to shrink to less populous more balanced species that we we'll need to work, and think innovatively and creatively in a way that we're simply not used to. To make the best of the adjusting years until an equilibrium is achieved. https://psmag.com/news/retire-early-die-early
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Old Yesterday, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Eastern Tennessee
2,573 posts, read 1,882,337 times
Reputation: 6826
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
According to this study albeit a bit dated the research shows a connection between longevity and later retirement. The data shows just one healthy adult retiring just one year later in life resulted in an 11% less likely chance of morality, and that's an all-cause death meaning the type of death didn't matter these individuals lived on average 11% longer. To me 11% is astounding to witness in just a single year. Just thinking about it logically this makes sense as we live in the world where many of our internal motivations become dependent on things that ultimately aren't needed to live i.e. a job, that these actually physically push us in old age. Seems like those who have something to live for specifically a job actually live longer. I think it's a remarkable example of the power of the human mind over the bodies in winch we inhibit, and their longevity depending on a mental drive. A drive that's more social than anything in a job we socially align ourselves to something bigger than ourselves to achieve goals that have little impact on our individual lives, but brings improvement to society as a whole for the most part at least. Just curious have retirees examined this phenomenon in real life or has it been the contrary of one's longer lofe being hindered by prolonged working years, and could you include the working conditions and whether they themselves were the cause and shouldn't be filled with seniors.

Seeing that people are living longer it looks like we have a ton of extra senior support labor just waiting to be harnessed. Winch has been hindered by our history of work conditions winch we've grown used to as a necessary sacrifice not something we'd willing do for the rest of our life. It's been well documented that this senior workforce is one of the key drivers, if not the biggest driver behind our long period of sustained economic growth. It seems that economists have overlooked it, as we always have rendering our future economic predictions as false as they've never included the potential of the folks that have pretty much created the jobs and systems we work with today returning to the workforce to pick up the slack. I think it's an awesome way that we can also change the narrative of folks not expecting to retire on well funded pensions as something that's totally bad and the standard for a fufilling life as a Senior. Besides I think of pentions as mostly being a useful catalyst for economic growth without them many industries definitely wouldn't be where they are today. This can be a super beneficial asset for a society with a disproportionate abundance of seniors to youth ratio.

Again most of our modern day systems can be mostly traced back to our seniors giving them an abundance of priceless knowledge that youth simply can't bring to the table. If one isn't broken I see no reason why one would think you absolutely have to retire fully a part time job sharing your expertise with younger individuals offers a better more fufilling retirement that invests in your country for years to come. It's almost inevitable with worldwide advancements that by 2100 the years of high growth Will be completely behind us as we start to shrink to less populous more balanced species that we we'll need to work, and think innovatively and creatively in a way that we're simply not used to. To make the best of the adjusting years until an equilibrium is achieved. https://psmag.com/news/retire-early-die-early
I always suspected those early retirees were up to no good.
Seriously though, don't you think some folks retire early due to health issues which might explain their early demise?
Sometimes there is more to the story than just numbers.
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Old Yesterday, 07:10 PM
 
4,065 posts, read 1,608,568 times
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early ones are older ones.
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Old Yesterday, 07:12 PM
 
677 posts, read 325,996 times
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Hmm I will call up my relative who retired in his 50s and tell him he should be dead now - its been like 35 years. . . . I'm sure he will want to know he did the wrong thing.
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Old Yesterday, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,711 posts, read 1,823,390 times
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Please, please, no anecdotal examples.
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Old Yesterday, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Haiku
4,629 posts, read 2,721,027 times
Reputation: 6730
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
According to this study albeit a bit dated the research shows a connection between longevity and later retirement. The data shows just one healthy adult retiring just one year later in life resulted in an 11% less likely chance of morality, and that's an all-cause death meaning the type of death didn't matter these individuals lived on average 11% longer.
To me, it is not about longevity it is about quality of your final years. So 30 years of retirement and kicking the bucket at say, 85 I think is a better deal than say, 25 years of retirement but living until 90. It is a lot easier to have fun when you are in your 60's or even 50's than it is when you are in your 80's.
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Old Yesterday, 08:20 PM
 
582 posts, read 121,434 times
Reputation: 685
I've heard this before, but its too easy to mix up causes and effects. Perhaps early retirees have more health problems or jobs that caused long term issues.

FWIW, I have seen a CalPERS (California retirement system) study that said that retired public safety officers lived *longer* than the average retiree. Maybe there's something to be said for getting 2-3 million dollars in an annuity.
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Old Yesterday, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
32,394 posts, read 20,410,524 times
Reputation: 46718
I suspect it will have more to do with what you DO when you retire, then when. Sit and watch tv with a bag of Doritos? Probably will die younger. Continue with learning new things, physically active and social? Will probably live longer.

But that is just my guess.
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Old Yesterday, 08:48 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,933 posts, read 40,434,621 times
Reputation: 24250
It is similar to USDA study that indicated seniors live 10 yrs longer independently if involved in a Co-operative senior living place than on their own in apartment or home. Being engaged in daily responsibilities is a plus, especially for those unlikely to pursue an active and engaged lifestyle. Consider older friends you know. Several in their 90's who are active. And 3 days ago ran on to a delightful aquaintence who is 103. She's a gas... Still joking...and involved helping others.
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Old Today, 01:27 AM
 
Location: on the wind
7,645 posts, read 3,195,082 times
Reputation: 25875
Sigh. There are so many factors that could affect longevity more significantly than numerical age at retirement. Unless you know exactly how this "study" was designed and what parameters were and were not included its really not all that useful. Then of course, no one knows which individuals will or won't be the ones affected by their age. Its not 100% true for anyone. Chalk this up as one more thing I can easily dismiss for the day...add it to all those chipper articles about "the top 12 places to retire." "find your dream ex-pat destination after retirement." "Top 10 tips for retirement riches." Blech.
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