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Old Today, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,817 posts, read 8,671,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
Have you ever had to evacuate?
Natural disasters are everywhere. I admit, Hurricane Harvey was horrible to deal with. It basically destroyed our city. But I also lived in California and Alaska, earthquake capitals, and Amarillo, tornado central, and I'd rather ditch the hurricanes and go with the earthquake prone areas.
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Old Today, 09:52 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,753 posts, read 5,063,759 times
Reputation: 22470
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mistermobile View Post
... the snow. When I visited him, I noticed that there were many homes in his neighborhood that were blue "tarp"-ed and one even had a tree smashed right through the middle.



My brother said that most of the "bad" homes had people living in them, but those people didn't have the cash to repair their homes caused by storm damage. He said that hurricanes caused a lot of damage but so did unreported tropical storms and most of the homes had been repaired once but that their owners just ran out of cash to repair multiple times.



The national weather service is one source to learn about historical bad weather events. Newer construction is supposed to reduce high wind and storm surge damage.
My homeowner's insurance policy has a $4K deductible! If you want reasonable payments keep $4K in the bank. That's probably why some people still have tarps on their roofs 2 years after Irma; they don't have the money for that deductible.
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Old Today, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,902 posts, read 49,850,310 times
Reputation: 19435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Natural disasters are everywhere.
That is not true.



Quote:
... I admit, Hurricane Harvey was horrible to deal with. It basically destroyed our city. But I also lived in California and Alaska, earthquake capitals, and Amarillo, tornado central, and I'd rather ditch the hurricanes and go with the earthquake prone areas.
drought?
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Old Today, 10:10 AM
 
12,243 posts, read 5,338,552 times
Reputation: 19907
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Natural disasters are everywhere. I admit, Hurricane Harvey was horrible to deal with. It basically destroyed our city. But I also lived in California and Alaska, earthquake capitals, and Amarillo, tornado central, and I'd rather ditch the hurricanes and go with the earthquake prone areas.
I disagree as well. Some states go decades or longer without natural disasters. I can't think of a single natural disaster in Utah for example. As far as earthquakes, there have been very few earthquakes in the U.S. that have destroyed cities. 1906 comes in mind for San Fran and then 1960s for some towns in Alaska. Otherwise, an earthquake that destroys a city is quite rare. Hurricanes that destroy cities are not very rare. So yes, I would choose earthquake country as opposed to hurricane country.
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Old Today, 10:15 AM
 
Location: State of Denial
1,961 posts, read 997,645 times
Reputation: 10399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeace View Post
Hurricane—that’s it, Florida is off the list. As a New Yorker I’ve always placed Florida on the top of my retirement home search list. In fact I have a another visit to Tampa area already planned in a couple months. But with this major hurricane headed to Florida I can only think living there is too much of a stress and hassle. Time to look for less greener pastures, I guess. Hard to give up the dream. These more frequent and stronger storms I believe are the result of climate change...and I don’t see that issue being addressed. Any advice as to where to move that doesn’t require hurricane shutters, evacuations and weeks with electricity?
Well, I live in Florida and I've never had hurricane shutters, I've never evacuated in the 41 years I've lived there and I've never gone for more than four days without electricity. My roof has never leaked and I've never had a window broken or a tree down in my yard. Florida *does* consist of more than the coastline, y'know?
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Old Today, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Colorado
105 posts, read 24,256 times
Reputation: 501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeace View Post
Hurricane—that’s it, Florida is off the list. As a New Yorker I’ve always placed Florida on the top of my retirement home search list. In fact I have a another visit to Tampa area already planned in a couple months. But with this major hurricane headed to Florida I can only think living there is too much of a stress and hassle. Time to look for less greener pastures, I guess. Hard to give up the dream. These more frequent and stronger storms I believe are the result of climate change...and I don’t see that issue being addressed. Any advice as to where to move that doesn’t require hurricane shutters, evacuations and weeks with electricity?

Strange that this one storm derailed one of your top choices for relocating in your retirement list. Florida is kinda known for its heat, its bugs, its humidity, and its hurricanes. I am envisioning the Caption Obvious commercials.

Good luck with finding those greener pastures.
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Old Today, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Northern Minnesota
30,214 posts, read 2,580,953 times
Reputation: 8959
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeace View Post
Hurricane—that’s it, Florida is off the list. As a New Yorker I’ve always placed Florida on the top of my retirement home search list. In fact I have a another visit to Tampa area already planned in a couple months. But with this major hurricane headed to Florida I can only think living there is too much of a stress and hassle. Time to look for less greener pastures, I guess. Hard to give up the dream. These more frequent and stronger storms I believe are the result of climate change...and I don’t see that issue being addressed. Any advice as to where to move that doesn’t require hurricane shutters, evacuations and weeks with electricity?
Please help me understand: You didn't know Florida has hurricanes every year? I'm not being snarky, but hurricanes have always been a part of life in Florida.
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Old Today, 10:57 AM
 
802 posts, read 512,084 times
Reputation: 2194
Quote:
Originally Posted by geebabe View Post
Please help me understand: You didn't know Florida has hurricanes every year? I'm not being snarky, but hurricanes have always been a part of life in Florida.

Yeah, I don't get it either. They have always been in the cross hairs of hurricanes for my entire half century life. What does this latest one have to do with it? Hurricanes are even becoming less frequent in Florida. In fact down 50% over the last 150 years. This is the longest stretch of ten years since a hurricane has even hit Florida. If anything it seems considerably safer now. Unfortunately this might be a case of believing hype over reality.
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Old Today, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,741 posts, read 9,806,214 times
Reputation: 11298
Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
I believe I read someplace that Az is the state with the least likelyhood of a natural disaster.

Being so close to California we have felt slight earthquakes. Only enough to shake things on shelves or make ceiling fans sway. One day I was at my desk and the back of my chair came forward and hit me in the back. Found out there was a minor quake 50 miles away. I guess fires are our biggest concern and we expect them every summer.
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Old Today, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,741 posts, read 9,806,214 times
Reputation: 11298
Quote:
Originally Posted by seeriously View Post
Oh, but it's a dry heat. 114 +

People always make fun of that but it is really not that bad as long as the humidity stays low. Heat AND humidity is the 'killer'.
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