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Old Today, 02:32 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,679 posts, read 3,213,663 times
Reputation: 26041

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
I have no idea why anyone would want to live in hurricane country.

Says me, living in volcano country.
Agree. Why people flock to such vulnerable coastal destinations escapes me. Hurricane threat isn't a matter of IF, but WHEN every single year, even if you don't happen to get hit by the eyewall itself, the topography of the place paints a big bulls eye on your house. They are not exactly rare...like volcanic eruptions.
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Old Today, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,225 posts, read 8,768,480 times
Reputation: 6325
Smile Hurricanes - I live in South Florida

I have lived in Florida since I was 11.

My parents live in an evacuation zone. They had to evacuate for Hurricane Andrew in 1992.
Their home was fine, built in the mid 1960's, custom built, not a cookie cutter development.

It was the home we grew up in and it's still standing. Never any damage from any storm and my parents never had shutters. I disagreed with that decision but it was their decision. They are gone now but not from a storm.

I've never had to evacuate, live more central but have shutters and just prepare. At least, you have warnings if you want to leave. We have neighbors who have left but they headed for Georgia. Now, that looks like not such a good idea.

Every area has its good and bad.

By next year, I will have the hurricane impact glass on all the properties I own so then I will have that in place.

I love living in Florida though.
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Old Today, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, QLD
3,370 posts, read 2,341,515 times
Reputation: 4856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
We like Nevada. We are 45 minutes to the mountains with a mild 4 seasons.
Nevada is awesome!! Great choice!!
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Old Today, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,527 posts, read 3,730,218 times
Reputation: 4980
I have a co-worker whose parents are in their early 70's and retired to Florida from Michigan. The co-worker hates hurricane season as it entails 3-4 months of worrying about her parents who are too stubborn to evacuate - each and every time.
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Old Today, 02:49 PM
 
14,456 posts, read 7,719,749 times
Reputation: 26451
Meh. Hurricanes aren't the issue. It's the low elevation and flooding. I'm very close to the ocean. My house is at 50 feet MSL. I'm not going to flood. If I'm inside the NWS hurricane cone 2 days before it is due to make landfall, I haul the boat, get the dinghy off the dinghy float, stuff all the outdoor furniture into the garage, dig the plywood panels out of the garage to protect the doors and windows, and do the usual provisioning like full tank of gasoline, start the chainsaw, make 100 lbs of block ice in the chest freezer, and dig out the oil lamps.
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Old Today, 03:08 PM
 
12,233 posts, read 5,330,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Meh. Hurricanes aren't the issue. It's the low elevation and flooding. I'm very close to the ocean. My house is at 50 feet MSL. I'm not going to flood. If I'm inside the NWS hurricane cone 2 days before it is due to make landfall, I haul the boat, get the dinghy off the dinghy float, stuff all the outdoor furniture into the garage, dig the plywood panels out of the garage to protect the doors and windows, and do the usual provisioning like full tank of gasoline, start the chainsaw, make 100 lbs of block ice in the chest freezer, and dig out the oil lamps.
Some people don't want the stress and all the prep work that goes into living in hurricane alley. It's not worth it to them regardless of how much money and insurane they have or how high their homes are from possible flooding. Retirement should be as stress free as possible.
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Old Today, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,476 posts, read 3,812,712 times
Reputation: 4305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeace View Post
Hurricaneóthatís it, Florida is off the list. As a New Yorker Iíve always placed Florida on the top of my retirement home search list. In fact I have a another visit to Tampa area already planned in a couple months. But with this major hurricane headed to Florida I can only think living there is too much of a stress and hassle. Time to look for less greener pastures, I guess. Hard to give up the dream. These more frequent and stronger storms I believe are the result of climate change...and I donít see that issue being addressed. Any advice as to where to move that doesnít require hurricane shutters, evacuations and weeks with electricity?
All areas of the country can have problems. For myself I would rule out the coasts. But you can go to Central FL and be pretty safe. Probably no matter where you go you will have the risk of losing electricity for a time so you can not avoid all risks.
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Old Today, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,465 posts, read 3,141,713 times
Reputation: 9878
We have lived in Florida for a total of 32 years and the closest we have come to getting hit by a hurricane was Irma, which only brushed past us. Some of our neighbors had power outages, our lights blinked twice and then stayed on.

Different parts of the state have more or less likelihood of being hit. We are on the gulf coast which historically gets less. My sister lives in a beach town below Cape Canaveral and has been hit several times.

We had use for a generator in the hills on northern NJ, never did in Florida. We experienced several hurricanes on Long Island, years ago.

My rule:"if you can't look out the window and see palm trees, you are too far north.
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Old Today, 03:30 PM
 
701 posts, read 209,045 times
Reputation: 1762
Door County is beautiful. I grew up in Wisconsin. However, I bet more people are injured and killed in winter driving then some of these natural disasters.
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Old Today, 03:35 PM
 
634 posts, read 127,033 times
Reputation: 792
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
Door County is beautiful. I grew up in Wisconsin. However, I bet more people are injured and killed in winter driving then some of these natural disasters.
I don't doubt that. Plus, the PITA level you get from a fierce winter is guaranteed in a lot of those places as opposed to the rare and random hurricane/earthquake/fire in other areas.
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