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Old 09-05-2019, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Land of the Great Bears
3,655 posts, read 2,028,871 times
Reputation: 4110

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeace View Post
. These more frequent and stronger storms I believe are the result of climate change..
Stronger-maybe, more frequent-perhaps the opposite. Current analysis suggests climate change may actually decrease number of Atlantic Hurricanes.

Of course, hurricanes menacing Florida is nothing new and they will certainly continue to be a major negative for living there.

If you're a heat lover then how about Arizona or New Mexico?
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Old 09-05-2019, 07:42 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
2,295 posts, read 985,038 times
Reputation: 6426
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeace View Post
Hurricaneóthatís it, Florida is off the list. As a New Yorker Iíve always placed Florida on the top of my retirement home search list. In fact I have a another visit to Tampa area already planned in a couple months. But with this major hurricane headed to Florida I can only think living there is too much of a stress and hassle. Time to look for less greener pastures, I guess. Hard to give up the dream. These more frequent and stronger storms I believe are the result of climate change...and I donít see that issue being addressed. Any advice as to where to move that doesnít require hurricane shutters, evacuations and weeks with electricity?
Seriously? Sorry, but you should step back, take a deep breath, and study the frequency and severity of Florida hurricanes before making such a decision. Iíve lived here three years now, all three of which were hurricane years. One of them came fairly close, the other two missed by a long ways. But looking at this long term, the last one to hit my area was 10 years ago. Before that was 2004. Before that was 25 years!

Obviously, if you live on the beach you are likely to suffer major damage if a hurricane hits you. Living even 45 minutes inland however greatly reduces the risk of damage, especially from storm surge.

At any rate, I will take a hurricane every single time over a tornado.
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Old 09-05-2019, 07:44 PM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
32,428 posts, read 37,145,030 times
Reputation: 39362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_n_Tenn View Post
In addition, it's a log cabin with a huge deck.
In the south, it's really important to have a really big deck all your friends can enjoy.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8z_XVioiKXM
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Old 09-05-2019, 08:37 PM
 
7,220 posts, read 4,029,300 times
Reputation: 16344
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeace View Post
Hurricaneóthatís it, Florida is off the list. As a New Yorker Iíve always placed Florida on the top of my retirement home search list. In fact I have a another visit to Tampa area already planned in a couple months. But with this major hurricane headed to Florida I can only think living there is too much of a stress and hassle. Time to look for less greener pastures, I guess. Hard to give up the dream. These more frequent and stronger storms I believe are the result of climate change...and I donít see that issue being addressed. Any advice as to where to move that doesnít require hurricane shutters, evacuations and weeks with electricity?

Our first retirement was in Hawaii instead of Florida. If you can live happily in a small space, it's great! We came back when the grandkids were born, but our time in Hawaii was really the happiest of my life.
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Old 09-05-2019, 08:54 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,811 posts, read 14,587,214 times
Reputation: 24326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron61 View Post
Obviously, if you live on the beach you are likely to suffer major damage if a hurricane hits you. Living even 45 minutes inland however greatly reduces the risk of damage, especially from storm surge.

At any rate, I will take a hurricane every single time over a tornado.
I'll have to disagree with this. Went through a category 4 hurricane in AL. Living inland 45 minutes from the landfall might have spared us the storm surge but our area was devastated, mostly as the result of the nearly 100 mph winds and the tornadoes that were spawned. Pretty interesting to see the upside down small airplane in the middle of the street afterwards though...

Last edited by DubbleT; 09-05-2019 at 09:18 PM.. Reason: clarify
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Old 09-06-2019, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,474 posts, read 6,027,637 times
Reputation: 7348
Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
I have friends that retired there and are moving back to Illinois because of the hurricanes. It was never on my top ten places to retire. It's a nice place to visit but......
Be curious to know where in FL your friends lived, and how long they lived there. Were they in an area affected by one or more hurricanes?
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Old 09-06-2019, 02:20 AM
 
150 posts, read 51,422 times
Reputation: 174
I know this is just anecdotal evidence but I sold my last home here in Venice Florida to out of staters 2 months after hurricane Irma hit our area. The buyers could've cared less about hurricanes. They were just ecstatic that they were going to be living in this area. My girlfriend put her villa up for sale just as hurricane Dorian was looming in the Bahamas. She got a full price offer within 24 hours of getting it listed. Again, the buyers made no mention of hurricanes. We have a good friend who is a real estate agent here and she has told us repeatedly that hurricanes are not a big concern to newcomers. The entire Sarasota area shows no signs of any slowing down of growth. In fact, it's the exact opposite. We've run out of land to develop here in the Venice area. Thousands of new homes are being built especially west of I-75. Hurricanes may give people brief cause for contemplation but IMO they won't stop or slow down the the influx of people moving to Florida. Those of us who live here wish the growth would slow down but we see no signs of that happening. Dorian will soon be history and people will forget about it. Those in the Bahamas won't easily forget so I imagine Dorian will slow down their immigration but I don't think it will affect Florida.
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Old 09-06-2019, 05:44 AM
 
8,309 posts, read 12,064,263 times
Reputation: 18462
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veniceman View Post
...In fact, it's the exact opposite. We've run out of land to develop here in the Venice area....
That's the same as Miami Beach. In fact, the last sliver of undeveloped oceanfront property (less than one acre total) just sold for $40,000,000. And this wasn't even in South Beach, where property and land prices are much higher.

Miami Beach is officially sold out of vacant oceanfront real estate.

The hotel developer Urbanica Management has paid $40 million, or roughly $1,000 per square foot, for a 0.98-acre lot at 6747 Collins Avenue. The brokerage firm APEX Capital Realty represented the buyer. The sale closed on Tuesday.

The property was the last undeveloped beachfront lot in Miami Beach, according to city officials. It sits between the Deauville Beach Resort and Sterling Condominium buildings on Collins Avenue.


Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/bus...#storylink=cpy
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Old 09-06-2019, 07:27 AM
 
Location: The Outer Limits
1,510 posts, read 1,873,176 times
Reputation: 2563
For me, owning any RE on the Southeast coast is not in my picture...to much stress with concern of storms.
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Old 09-06-2019, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Northern Wisconsin
9,121 posts, read 7,900,578 times
Reputation: 15721
Nonsense OP. Hurricanes are part of like in Fl and the coast. If you havent factored that into the equation, you'd better start.
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