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Old 09-14-2019, 02:14 PM
 
2,064 posts, read 2,466,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Meh. Hurricanes aren't the issue. It's the low elevation and flooding. I'm very close to the ocean. My house is at 50 feet MSL. I'm not going to flood. If I'm inside the NWS hurricane cone 2 days before it is due to make landfall, I haul the boat, get the dinghy off the dinghy float, stuff all the outdoor furniture into the garage, dig the plywood panels out of the garage to protect the doors and windows, and do the usual provisioning like full tank of gasoline, start the chainsaw, make 100 lbs of block ice in the chest freezer, and dig out the oil lamps.
Man, thatís a lot of work.
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Old 09-14-2019, 03:54 PM
 
2,604 posts, read 2,982,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
I have friends that retired there and are moving back to Illinois because of the hurricanes. It was never on my top ten places to retire. It's a nice place to visit but......

Same, it's a nice place to visit. I like visiting Florida as a tourist, but nothing more.

I don't think the occasional bad weather in Florida will deter people from moving there until lots of it is submerged, but that will be in future generations.
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Old 09-14-2019, 04:19 PM
Status: "Hard work is never easy" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
3,152 posts, read 4,462,052 times
Reputation: 1841
cool wind map ... https://earth.nullschool.net/#curren....07,26.39,3000
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Old 09-14-2019, 08:16 PM
 
9 posts, read 2,884 times
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Meh, our house is 5 miles from the intercostal waterway and my GPS says the elevation is 17 feet. Despite that, we aren't in the mandatory evacuation map for even a Cat 5.

Sounds scary, but I've been here 21+ years and have watched more than a couple hurricanes spin by out in the gulf. Could it happen? Sure. Will it happen? Odds are in my favor. If I could get those odds in Vegas, I'd put down the retirement fund and roll the dice!
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Old 09-15-2019, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Florida
20,126 posts, read 20,242,014 times
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Definitely avoid Florida because of hurricanes!
(Even though we hadn't returned yet, for the winter in 2012, and were still in NYS where we were blasted by Sandy)
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Old 09-15-2019, 09:39 AM
Status: "Hard work is never easy" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
3,152 posts, read 4,462,052 times
Reputation: 1841
Sandy would have been a nothing in Florida. However, if it snowed substantially in Florida I would expect a similar effect.
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Old Yesterday, 08:12 AM
 
30,037 posts, read 35,221,344 times
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North Carolina has had four coastal hurricanes since 2016 and folks aren't leaving and construction at the SE beaches at least is strong. If you like and want coastal living then storms are probably just part of the package you are buying in to. What we have noticed from our experience is that it is very doable and relatively easy to deal with if you have the resources to be able to roll with the punches and recover quickly. If you don't the punches are harder and the recovery can be a night mare.
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Old Yesterday, 08:48 AM
 
103 posts, read 100,125 times
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Why anyone would even consider retiring in FL in this day and age is beyond me. Weather volatility is only going to get worse. FYI yarall, FL has about 5 nuclear reactors, all on the coast line. Its a Fukishima in the making. Not to mention floods that are not even connected to the hurricanes. Water is rising up from the ground through porous soils there. They call it a "sunny day flood". Personally me, some 20-30 years from retirement - depending on how well things go, ha, I bought a place in a ski resort out west. I use it in the winter to ski and figured this could come in handy when I retire. Guess what, though. I have summer tenants who are current retirees from Florida. Yep. The heat in FL is too much and from April to October they're escaping to the mountains. For those thinking long term, given the climate change trend, better buy places up north and at higher elevations. These will be at a premium long after last FL shacks are swept into the sea by another Cat 5.
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Old Yesterday, 08:56 AM
 
15,387 posts, read 31,529,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandweller13 View Post
Why anyone would even consider retiring in FL in this day and age is beyond me. Weather volatility is only going to get worse. FYI yarall, FL has about 5 nuclear reactors, all on the coast line. Its a Fukishima in the making. Not to mention floods that are not even connected to the hurricanes. Water is rising up from the ground through porous soils there. They call it a "sunny day flood". Personally me, some 20-30 years from retirement - depending on how well things go, ha, I bought a place in a ski resort out west. I use it in the winter to ski and figured this could come in handy when I retire. Guess what, though. I have summer tenants who are current retirees from Florida. Yep. The heat in FL is too much and from April to October they're escaping to the mountains. For those thinking long term, given the climate change trend, better buy places up north and at higher elevations. These will be at a premium long after last FL shacks are swept into the sea by another Cat 5.
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Old Yesterday, 09:32 AM
 
14,547 posts, read 7,805,371 times
Reputation: 26661
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandweller13 View Post
I bought a place in a ski resort out west. I use it in the winter to ski and figured this could come in handy when I retire. Guess what, though. I have summer tenants who are current retirees from Florida. Yep. The heat in FL is too much and from April to October they're escaping to the mountains.

My Vermont ski resort is stuffed full of Florida plates from people escaping the heat and humidity for a few months. Anything with no stairs and a ground floor master bedroom suite rents easily in July/August.


Of course, Hurricane Irene trashed the town on August 28, 2011. A friend of mine had his house wash away in the flooding and I put him up for a few months in my empty condo. There were a few weeks where all the roads in and out of town were washed out. I drove up with a car load of provisions to open my place up. Even with 4wd and ground clearance, it was pretty iffy.
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