U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-16-2019, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
2,105 posts, read 2,725,688 times
Reputation: 8224

Advertisements

As a long-time Florida resident (not a native, but I've been here since 1973), I say the following to those folks who are/were considering Florida as a retirement home but are concerned about the possibility of hurricanes:

Please don't move here.

It will be better for all of us if you move somewhere else. You won't have the anxiety of hurricanes to deal with, and we'll have one fewer new resident to have to provide services for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-16-2019, 10:42 AM
Status: "Hard work is never easy" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
3,200 posts, read 4,468,020 times
Reputation: 1866
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandweller13 View Post
Why anyone would even consider retiring in FL in this day and age is beyond me. Weather volatility is only going to get worse. FYI yarall, FL has about 5 nuclear reactors, all on the coast line. Its a Fukishima in the making. Not to mention floods that are not even connected to the hurricanes. Water is rising up from the ground through porous soils there. They call it a "sunny day flood". Personally me, some 20-30 years from retirement - depending on how well things go, ha, I bought a place in a ski resort out west. I use it in the winter to ski and figured this could come in handy when I retire. Guess what, though. I have summer tenants who are current retirees from Florida. Yep. The heat in FL is too much and from April to October they're escaping to the mountains. For those thinking long term, given the climate change trend, better buy places up north and at higher elevations. These will be at a premium long after last FL shacks are swept into the sea by another Cat 5.
When you check the definition of BS.... you'll see this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2019, 10:48 AM
Status: "Hard work is never easy" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
3,200 posts, read 4,468,020 times
Reputation: 1866
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
As a long-time Florida resident (not a native, but I've been here since 1973), I say the following to those folks who are/were considering Florida as a retirement home but are concerned about the possibility of hurricanes:

Please don't move here.

It will be better for all of us if you move somewhere else. You won't have the anxiety of hurricanes to deal with, and we'll have one fewer new resident to have to provide services for.
Thank you, Well said. Retired Electric Utility employee.

Individual anxiety plays our on road ways, our stores, and affects our ability for restoration workers (multiple disciplines including medical) to "get the job done" during storm. Anytime people get scared they become selfish and aggressive.

Way too many years dealing with transplants demanding me first while trying to restore power after a hurricane.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2019, 04:31 PM
 
3,112 posts, read 1,109,823 times
Reputation: 3494
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_n_Tenn View Post
When you check the definition of BS.... you'll see this.
Donít agree with some of his conclusions but he is right on some. Iím counting on many thinking like you that is all BS when I put up my place for sale.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2019, 08:04 PM
 
5,454 posts, read 3,543,310 times
Reputation: 13842
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandweller13 View Post

Why anyone would even consider retiring in FL in this day and age is beyond me. Weather volatility is only going to get worse. FYI yarall, FL has about 5 nuclear reactors, all on the coast line. Its a Fukishima in the making. Not to mention floods that are not even connected to the hurricanes. Water is rising up from the ground through porous soils there. They call it a "sunny day flood". Personally me, some 20-30 years from retirement - depending on how well things go, ha, I bought a place in a ski resort out west. I use it in the winter to ski and figured this could come in handy when I retire. Guess what, though. I have summer tenants who are current retirees from Florida. Yep. The heat in FL is too much and from April to October they're escaping to the mountains. For those thinking long term, given the climate change trend, better buy places up north and at higher elevations. These will be at a premium long after last FL shacks are swept into the sea by another Cat 5.
Since you are 20 to 30 years from retirement, I concur with your thinking - which is fact-based and accurate.

And many of the factors are happening right now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Sportsfan View Post

I’m counting on many thinking like you that is all BS when I put up my place for sale.
oh yes, plenty of people in denial and are non-readers and low information people! (similar to low information voters)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2019, 10:26 PM
 
8,322 posts, read 12,075,881 times
Reputation: 18531
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_n_Tenn View Post
When you check the definition of BS.... you'll see this.
Yep.

What's even more ridiculous is that according to the people who post here, virtually everyone they've ever known in their entire lives who retired to Florida moved back up north because Florida is just that bad. And yet, Florida's population keeps going up and up every year. So either the census takers are lying or the people who are posting about their friends, family, acquaintances, cowarkers, etc., etc., etc., all leaving Florida shortly after retiring here are all FOS.

Hmmm....I wonder what the correct answer is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2019, 06:53 AM
 
111 posts, read 100,842 times
Reputation: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
Yep.

What's even more ridiculous is that according to the people who post here, virtually everyone they've ever known in their entire lives who retired to Florida moved back up north because Florida is just that bad. And yet, Florida's population keeps going up and up every year. So either the census takers are lying or the people who are posting about their friends, family, acquaintances, cowarkers, etc., etc., etc., all leaving Florida shortly after retiring here are all FOS.

Hmmm....I wonder what the correct answer is.
Neither answer is correct.

FL IS bad. FL's main attraction is that it's cheap and has no state income tax and no estate tax. It does not have a lot going on as far as climate, which is quite horrible compared to many places, has a lot of adverse weather events, not much of cultural life to speak of, and it lacks meaningful outdoors opportunities outside of the beach, etc.

People who move there primarily do so to save on taxes and to lower their cost of living. As a result, it has been attracting very specific demographics - specifically, lower-middle class that is being priced out of the North East, and the retirees. Then you have that mix sprinkled with some millionaires and billionaires flocking to Golden Beach and Palm Beach, and you have your smaller-scale south american and russian oligarchs and corrupt politicians laundering money on the coast line. Am i missing anything? Nope, don't think so.

So yes, the population is growing, but for the wrong reasons and it's adding the wrong people. At some point (Strictly demographically speaking) the supply of people who are moving to FL to die will dwindle. The lower income folks will probably continue to move there and to other locations in the South in great numbers, considering that the inequities in income distribution will only be getting worse in the years to come due to the advent of AI and other techy stuff. So the state really has the potential to become the back-office of America, with a lot of people employed in service and support functions, distribution, hospitality, etc. - but not nearly enough middle and upper middle class to form that critical mass of professionals that could attracts front office/HQs of businesses.

You wanna know where educated professionals are moving when they seek to escape NYC and other high cost of living hellscapes? Denver, Austin, Nashville, Portland, Seattle, Raleigh. All places with vibrant scenes and plentiful outdoor opportunities that include options other than hitting golf balls and sitting on the beach.

So there you have it. FL is literally taking in the poor and huddled masses, but they are not moving there because it is great, but rather despite it being bad. And this is nothing to be proud of.

Last edited by urbandweller13; 09-17-2019 at 07:34 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2019, 07:58 AM
Status: "Hard work is never easy" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
3,200 posts, read 4,468,020 times
Reputation: 1866
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandweller13 View Post
Neither answer is correct.

FL IS bad. FL's main attraction is that it's cheap and has no state income tax and no estate tax. It does not have a lot going on as far as climate, which is quite horrible compared to many places, has a lot of adverse weather events, not much of cultural life to speak of, and it lacks meaningful outdoors opportunities outside of the beach, etc.

People who move there primarily do so to save on taxes and to lower their cost of living. As a result, it has been attracting very specific demographics - specifically, lower-middle class that is being priced out of the North East, and the retirees. Then you have that mix sprinkled with some millionaires and billionaires flocking to Golden Beach and Palm Beach, and you have your smaller-scale south american and russian oligarchs and corrupt politicians laundering money on the coast line. Am i missing anything? Nope, don't think so.

So yes, the population is growing, but for the wrong reasons and it's adding the wrong people. At some point (Strictly demographically speaking) the supply of people who are moving to FL to die will dwindle. The lower income folks will probably continue to move there and to other locations in the South in great numbers, considering that the inequities in income distribution will only be getting worse in the years to come due to the advent of AI and other techy stuff. So the state really has the potential to become the back-office of America, with a lot of people employed in service and support functions, distribution, hospitality, etc. - but not nearly enough middle and upper middle class to form that critical mass of professionals that could attracts front office/HQs of businesses.

You wanna know where educated professionals are moving when they seek to escape NYC and other high cost of living hellscapes? Denver, Austin, Nashville, Portland, Seattle, Raleigh. All places with vibrant scenes and plentiful outdoor opportunities that include options other than hitting golf balls and sitting on the beach.

So there you have it. FL is literally taking in the poor and huddled masses, but they are not moving there because it is great, but rather despite it being bad. And this is nothing to be proud of.
Wow. Ok this is ignorance at an immeasurable level.

Low cost of living and low taxes is good... right? Apparently lots of folks think so, Texas too is enjoying population and economic boom like Florida for similar reasons.

You're suggesting poor climate... whaa? really? Florida gets 30,000,000 visitor each year in spite of suckey weather? lol. Cultural opportunities are quite ample in urban areas, but the one that gets me is when you stated "lacks meaningful outdoors opportunities outside of the beach". Fishing and boating capital of the WORLD! Parks and outdoor areas abound, from cool clear springs of central Florida to rich forests of Ocala, to coastal swamps and the Everglades. How about sports? 3 professional NFL teams, 2 baseball, 2 NBA and many many college teams.

Florida is drawing many professionals and is expanding (economically) exponentially. Bio research, NASA, aviation, robotic solar manufacturing, boat building, agricultural development, and the financial the hub for the "Americas". Florida will always be a tourist destination so I did not mention Disney or the Cruise industry, but port development for shipping and the recent expansion of Brightline.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2019, 08:33 AM
 
111 posts, read 100,842 times
Reputation: 90
Listen, I understand that arguing with FL prophesier is like arguing with jehovahs witnesses - the arguments tend to run generally fact-free. But here it goes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_n_Tenn View Post
You're suggesting poor climate... whaa? really? Florida gets 30,000,000 visitor each year in spite of suckey weather? lol.
Yes, really. There's considerable seasonality in those numbers with the peak being in March-April, for the obvious reason that outside of those months, FL weather for the most part SUCKS. It actually gets cold and not super beachy in Dec-Jan, it gets ridiculously hot between May-Sept, and on top of that you have the hurricane season. So, there's "visiting" and then there's living there year round.


Quote:
Cultural opportunities are quite ample in urban areas
Not even coming close to places like NYC, LA, SF, Denver. Heck, even Austin and Nashville will give most places in FL a good run for their money.

Quote:
but the one that gets me is when you stated "lacks meaningful outdoors opportunities outside of the beach". Fishing and boating capital of the WORLD! Parks and outdoor areas abound, from cool clear springs of central Florida to rich forests of Ocala, to coastal swamps and the Everglades.
Any person who seriously mentions FL outdoor opportunities should take his time to visit Colorado, WY, Montana (Yellowstone), Utah (where every county has a national park), Pacific Northwest, to see what the rest of us mean when we say "outdoors". I will see your "boating" and raise you hiking, mountain biking, wild life watching, photo safaries, fly fishing, hunting, white water rafting, snowmobiling, rock climbing, skiing cross country and alpine, snowshoeing, snowmobiling and a few other things I am probably forgetting here. Not to mention the sheer beauty and bio diversity of the West/North West which frankly is unmatched.

Quote:
How about sports? 3 professional NFL teams, 2 baseball, 2 NBA and many many college teams.
I am not sure if this was supposed to be in reference to cultural opportunities or the outdoors, but either way - LOL.

Quote:
Florida is drawing many professionals and is expanding (economically) exponentially. Bio research, NASA, aviation, robotic solar manufacturing, boat building, agricultural development, and the financial the hub for the "Americas". Florida will always be a tourist destination so I did not mention Disney or the Cruise industry, but port development for shipping and the recent expansion of Brightline.
This sounds like a lot of feel-good BS not supported by the numbers. FL ranks #40 out 52 states & territories by per capita income. Which suggest the migration pattern that i described above. Which, incidentally, can also be observed on the ground by just looking around, and more indirectly by doing a search for high-tech jobs and high paying jobs in FL metros and comparing the # of results to other metros.

For example, indeed.com shows 1,566 jobs for "Software Engineer" in Orlando, 1,386 in Miami and 5,392 in Denver. For "Director of Finance" the numbers are 221 in Orlando, 378 in Miami and 601 in Denver. I rest my case here. (and, btw, I have no affiliation with Denver whatsoever and I don't even like it).

Last edited by urbandweller13; 09-17-2019 at 09:09 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2019, 09:57 AM
Status: "Hard work is never easy" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
3,200 posts, read 4,468,020 times
Reputation: 1866
So when you can't dispute something it becomes "feel good BS". Thanks for using facts.
Geography determines outdoor activities. We don't snow ski in FL, but we do scuba dive all year and water ski.

Clearly you have a bias against Florida for whatever reason. In addition I usta live in NM (originally) have a place in TN right outside the GSMNP and call Florida my home. I have a good sense of what Florida offers, raise 4 kids who are highly educated (in FL) and had a 35 yr career that I retired from ... right here in FL, so I'm not talking out my ass.

Bless your heart
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top