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Old 09-17-2019, 10:08 AM
 
113 posts, read 102,550 times
Reputation: 103

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_n_Tenn View Post
So when you can't dispute something it becomes "feel good BS". Thanks for using facts.
Geography determines outdoor activities. We don't snow ski in FL, but we do scuba dive all year and water ski.

Clearly you have a bias against Florida for whatever reason. In addition I usta live in NM (originally) have a place in TN right outside the GSMNP and call Florida my home. I have a good sense of what Florida offers, raise 4 kids who are highly educated (in FL) and had a 35 yr career that I retired from ... right here in FL, so I'm not talking out my ass.

Bless your heart
I DID use facts. FL remains one the poorest states in the nation, period full stop. It's population growth is not producing wealth or GDP growth... (in fact it ranks 29 in GDP growth behind NY, CO, UT, AZ et.. it should be fairly obvious that the image of the economic power house that FL establishment is peddling is false advertising. Its in the numbers. And, I am well familiar with FL and have nothing against it, in fact I used to have investment properties there which i picked up during 2009 bust when they could be had with a couple of north-east paychecks. So, for that reason I tend to know a thing or two about the state and the going ons there. To each his own and it's a nice place to visit in March. Let's agree to disagree on the rest of it.
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Old 09-17-2019, 10:26 AM
Status: "Hard work is never easy" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
3,212 posts, read 4,472,793 times
Reputation: 1871
You hate Florida? and live in a city... right?
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Old 09-17-2019, 11:41 AM
 
8,323 posts, read 12,078,651 times
Reputation: 18531
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandweller13 View Post
FL IS bad. FL's main attraction is that it's cheap and has no state income tax and no estate tax. It does not have a lot going on as far as climate, which is quite horrible compared to many places, has a lot of adverse weather events, not much of cultural life to speak of, and it lacks meaningful outdoors opportunities outside of the beach, etc.
Interesting comment considering I went to two classical concerts last weekend and have tickets to another performance this coming Saturday night. Friday was a brass and woodwind ensemble, while Saturday was a string ensemble concert featuring selections by Mozart, Bartok, and Korngold. This coming Saturday my wife and I will be attending a sold-out full orchestra concert with selections from Tchaikovsky, Strauss, and Ravel.

What did you do last weekend?

Oh, and I have season tickets to the 2019-2020 Broadway in Miami series at the Adrienne Arsht Center, which is set to begin next month, as does the Broadway in Ft. Lauderdale season at the Broward Center. And although I don't have season tickets to it, I may even take in a performance of the Miami City Ballet next month as well.

https://www.arshtcenter.org/
https://www.arshtcenter.org/Tickets/...i-City-Ballet/
https://www.browardcenter.org/subscr...-2020-broadway

While it's true that Miami isn't in the same league as NYC, LA, or even DC, I was under the impression that we had many cultural avenues to explore; in fact, more than I can possibly fit into my schedule. I guess I just didn't realize that I was actually culturally-starved living down here in Miami. Thanks for letting me know.


Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandweller13 View Post
Yes, really. There's considerable seasonality in those numbers with the peak being in March-April, for the obvious reason that outside of those months, FL weather for the most part SUCKS. It actually gets cold and not super beachy in Dec-Jan, it gets ridiculously hot between May-Sept, and on top of that you have the hurricane season. So, there's "visiting" and then there's living there year round.
Once again, people fall into the same idiocy of describing "Florida" as if it was a single, small town somewhere. If you truly believe that it's cold and "not super beachy in Dec-Jan" in Miami, then you're delusional and there's no point in continuing to attempt to have a rational discussion with you.

One other point about the weather before I leave. A couple of months ago I signed up to participate in a home exchange program, with the thinking that I'd get some interest for stays during the winter. To my surprise, I was inundated with requests from people all across Europe and other areas wanting to come in July, August, Sept, October, etc. People are clamoring for a chance to take transatlantic flights to spend their vacations in Miami Beach in the heart of summer and the autumn hurricane season.

Not too shabby for a place where - - - according to you - - - the weather "SUCKS." (Again, in all caps as you did.)
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Old 09-17-2019, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,521 posts, read 688,997 times
Reputation: 3648
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
As a long-time Florida resident (not a native, but I've been here since 1973), I say the following to those folks who are/were considering Florida as a retirement home but are concerned about the possibility of hurricanes:

Please don't move here.

It will be better for all of us if you move somewhere else. You won't have the anxiety of hurricanes to deal with, and we'll have one fewer new resident to have to provide services for.
So, to anyone having reservations about any locale, the answer is "just don't move here?" Isn't one of the purposes of City-Data for people to float their concerns and gather input from others before making decisions? Then they can decide whether they can deal with the risks in order to enjoy the rewards.
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Old 09-17-2019, 01:50 PM
 
113 posts, read 102,550 times
Reputation: 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
If you truly believe that it's cold and "not super beachy in Dec-Jan" in Miami, then you're delusional and there's no point in continuing to attempt to have a rational discussion with you.
Like I said, the discussion with Floridians is usually fact free. So, averages in Miami in December are 75 high and 65 low. While obviously warmer than the north-east, that is exactly what I call not beachy weather. I am just not dying to jump into the ocean when the temperature is 75. We have this same exact weather right now in NYC and it is not beachy. YMMV. And yes, I have been in Miami and Key West in December, and have photos of me wearing a light jacket on the beach to show for it. It is well understood that the peak season in south FL, coinciding with the best weather there, is March through May. Though, I am sure that plenty of budget oriented people will prefer to visit during the value season in the summer. Trying to dispute the obvious only earns you "one who protests too much" reputation.
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Old 09-17-2019, 01:56 PM
 
5,456 posts, read 3,544,857 times
Reputation: 13842
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandweller13 View Post

It is well understood that the peak season in south FL, coinciding with the best weather there, is March through May.
When I used to vacation in Naples, Florida, I always went in March - because April was always too hot and too humid on the beach and off the beach and often scorching - and February was not dependable at all, in that it was often cloudy and gray in late February, and sometimes too cool or rainy for the beach and too much chance of disappointment.

Last edited by matisse12; 09-17-2019 at 03:17 PM..
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Old 09-17-2019, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
2,105 posts, read 2,726,962 times
Reputation: 8229
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
So, to anyone having reservations about any locale, the answer is "just don't move here?" Isn't one of the purposes of City-Data for people to float their concerns and gather input from others before making decisions? Then they can decide whether they can deal with the risks in order to enjoy the rewards.
OP floated her concerns, I gave my input. It's best not to move to a location about which you have concerns like OP's. Why live with anxiety when you can go somewhere else where it's not an issue?
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Old 09-17-2019, 02:25 PM
Status: "Hard work is never easy" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
3,212 posts, read 4,472,793 times
Reputation: 1871
If you don't like Florida please include your state. Turnabout is fair play.
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Old 09-17-2019, 03:02 PM
 
30,038 posts, read 35,234,663 times
Reputation: 11966
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandweller13 View Post
I DID use facts. FL remains one the poorest states in the nation, period full stop. It's population growth is not producing wealth or GDP growth... (in fact it ranks 29 in GDP growth behind NY, CO, UT, AZ et.. it should be fairly obvious that the image of the economic power house that FL establishment is peddling is false advertising. Its in the numbers. And, I am well familiar with FL and have nothing against it, in fact I used to have investment properties there which i picked up during 2009 bust when they could be had with a couple of north-east paychecks. So, for that reason I tend to know a thing or two about the state and the going ons there. To each his own and it's a nice place to visit in March. Let's agree to disagree on the rest of it.
On a recent trip to Florida I had conversation with politically active and influential conservative and some other family members. It was interesting and enlightening and in some ways reflects your comments.
There concern was that Florida had individual wealth but that wealth was concentrated in the hands of older residents many retired and transplants. What was missing and being sought out was young well educated (especially tech) who would be a catalyst to developing their economic growth agenda.

They were disappointed in not attracting Apple and a few other major corporations to the state and in particular the metro area they lived in and were especially influential in.

We had good frank conversation about why the age differences in how Florida was looked at.

I will not get into those as they are relevant to this forum. What is relevant is that the positives of Florida were more attractive to older residents (especially transplants and much less so to younger especially family oriented professionals.
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Old 09-17-2019, 03:08 PM
 
3,112 posts, read 1,110,406 times
Reputation: 3494
Every state has its pluses and minuses. Certainly no snow is a big attractant to retirees in Florida as well as no State Income Tax and comparatively low Property taxes and housing.

The downside is really unchecked growth the state and cities have done a poor job at managing the growth and housing goes in all over the place with not much infrastructure. There is also 5he issue of home insurance where our state is not covered by most national insurances but by mainly Florida insurances which have yet to show that they can withstand hurricane loses from a major hurricane hitting a large metro area. Citizens was created by state to cover the national insurances leaving but they will pass on their losses to the general population is on the constitution. So yes this state is very vulnerable economically to a major hurricane hit.
If you are coming to work the pay in most of the larger cities is not enough to cover the prices of housing. This is specially so in Dade and Broward.
And yes water level rise is real and the state will have to face it. I happen to live in this state for over 50 years and in the coastal areas flooding from King Tides became worse and more common in past few years. My entire street was raised 3 feet by the city and they have done this all over the city.
So as I stated before there are good and bad everywhere and you should educate before moving down, so there are no surprises

Last edited by Beach Sportsfan; 09-17-2019 at 03:35 PM..
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