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Old Today, 08:00 AM
 
6,641 posts, read 3,680,806 times
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Why a lot of people become Snowbirds in their retirement. They don't live in Florida year round but come there in the Winter months only. Weather is better (not as hot and humid) and very little chance of a hurricane. Many of these Snowbirds don't buy but rent that way they do not have year round maintenance to do when they aren't there. You don't want your AC to break down and come back to mold all over your place. That happened to my SIL and BIL.

We used to live in Naples for 10 years. When Season comes, it gets very, very crazy with all the Snowbirds and Tourists. In fact we used to tell people thinking of retiring there year round, come here first in July or August and see if you want to live here year round.

Last edited by Jo48; Today at 08:11 AM..
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Old Today, 08:06 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,728 posts, read 5,057,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
I think the same is true for long time residents anywhere. They learn to adapt to, and find ways to mitigate the effects of the less desirable events ( such as natural disasters, unrelenting extremes in weather, temperatures) for both themselves and their neighbors.

I don't think I ever was more proud to be a Floridian than the time after Hurricane Andrew ( 1992) in Miami. As miserable as it was with all the destruction, and lack of the amenities we're all too used to, there were countless examples of people helping each other, working together to make things a little better for those around them. I recall neighbors sharing their generators, dividing up the power so that one neighbor hooked up a communal coffee pot, another hooked up his washer for neighborhood use ( this area was without power for a month after Andrew), phone lines were shared as having a working phone line was sporadic at best. Grocery stores near us gave away the meat and frozen items in their freezers, as they had no way of preserving the food, and neighbors cooked the meat on their grills for a communal barbecue/hot meal. I'll never forget the police officers, and volunteers who spent countless hot, humid hours at busy highway and street intersections directing traffic when the signals were out/ or destroyed, and the folks who would hand them bottles of cold water or drinks as they went by.

One of our neighbors' baby developed severe diarrhea, and her pediatrician recommended Pedialyte, there was none to be had, and after searching everywhere, they asked me to see if the staff at the Children's hospital where I worked might suggest a source where they could find some Pedialyte. When I asked the Director of Nursing about this, she gave me ( free of charge), an entire case of Pedialyte for our neighbors' baby.

There were so many similar incidents like this. And I know the same thing happens in areas ravaged by tornadoes and flooding in the midwest, those folks are resilient and self-starting "get 'er done" folks so we don't hear much about it- as I believe, from what I've seen and heard ( my brother lives up near your neck of the woods in upstate NY) the folks where you are that way as well.
I couldn't rep you again but this is a great post. :-)
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Old Today, 08:08 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
211 posts, read 193,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
Los Angeles.
San Diego.
San Francisco.
These are good areas weather wise for the most part. However, they may be too expensive for any of us now. From 1978-1983, I was living in Southern California with my then husband and family. We had torrential rains in February of 1983. The water control channel nearby cracked, causing major flooding. Our house was flooded out, and we had to move out while repairs were done. We later moved out of California. Disasters can happen anywhere.
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Old Today, 08:11 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ312 View Post
Quickly turning into 3rd world areas with the homelessness epidemic.
Not to mention earthquakes, fires, mudslides and extremely high COL. I don't think there is anyplace in the USA that doesn't experience some sort of natural disaster. After Irma, I googled places in the United States that has the last amount of natural disasters and I got two cities in Ohio.
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Old Today, 08:21 AM
 
12,237 posts, read 5,334,540 times
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Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
Not to mention earthquakes, fires, mudslides and extremely high COL. I don't think there is anyplace in the USA that doesn't experience some sort of natural disaster. After Irma, I googled places in the United States that has the last amount of natural disasters and I got two cities in Ohio.
Yes, some places in the Midwest and upper New York have the least amount of natural disasters. There are very few if any earthquakes, hurricanes, mudslides, tornadoes, wild fires and some do not have any issues with flooding. You may not want to live there, but that's not the point.

Cold weather and snow are not natural disasters. That's normal winter weather with little impact to infrastructure and people's lives who live there.

https://www.cbsnews.com/media/top-10...ral-disasters/

Last edited by marino760; Today at 08:30 AM..
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Old Today, 08:32 AM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
32,321 posts, read 37,055,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeace View Post
These more frequent and stronger storms I believe are the result of climate change...and I donít see that issue being addressed. Any advice as to where to move that doesnít require hurricane shutters, evacuations and weeks with electricity?
I disagree. We had more storms and bigger back in the 60's and 70's than we have today. The largest was in 1900 that killed over 6000 people in Galveston.

We just have a lot more people and development to be destroyed. Old H's used to not do the damage because they hit empty lands.
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Old Today, 08:33 AM
 
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I suppose different strokes, for different folks. I could never get used to the horrible heat and humidity; both times in my 20s and again in my 60s. People used to say to me that after a while you get used to it. 10 years isn't enough time to acclimate? It did not bother my husband as much, until after he had his heart attack. After that he couldn't not be outside for any length of time except the Winter months.

I've never been in a hurricane in Florida, but I have been twice in NY including for Sandy. You really cannot escape weather wherever you are as others have said.
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Old Today, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
918 posts, read 316,923 times
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I don't get the OP...hurricanes hit FL with some frequency and have done so since the dawn of man. How ironic that a hurricane that in all likelihood won't actually hit Florida is taking it off that person's list, but not the dozens before that actually did hit. People sure can be funny.
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Old Today, 08:38 AM
 
12,237 posts, read 5,334,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janeace View Post
Hurricane—that’s it, Florida is off the list. As a New Yorker I’ve always placed Florida on the top of my retirement home search list. In fact I have a another visit to Tampa area already planned in a couple months. But with this major hurricane headed to Florida I can only think living there is too much of a stress and hassle. Time to look for less greener pastures, I guess. Hard to give up the dream. These more frequent and stronger storms I believe are the result of climate change...and I don’t see that issue being addressed. Any advice as to where to move that doesn’t require hurricane shutters, evacuations and weeks with electricity?
I do find this rather strange too as if the OP weren't aware Florida is prime territory for hurricanes and gets smacked by one every few years along with near misses more often. I would have thought Florida would have have never been on the list.
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Old Today, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
2,077 posts, read 2,703,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
-hurricanes
-humidity
-sinkholes
-alligators
-palmetto bugs

What's not to like?
And don't forget the biggest threat to Florida residents: "Florida Man"!!!!!
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