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Old 09-09-2019, 05:59 AM
 
180 posts, read 78,835 times
Reputation: 697

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kell490 View Post
Depends on what kind of RV your talking about plus like a said I can fix most things myself. I do all my own vehicle repairs even transmissions, overhaul engines nothing I can't fix. I buy older cars spend less then $1000 make them like new most people are lazy plastic parts break they dump the vehicle go buy new.

I grew up in the 80's I think it was the last generation of fixing things yourself. When I was a kid my father fixed everything we even put a new roof on our home. Today everyone I meet at work is so lazy they just pay someone to do everything, or buy new rack up bunch of debt. I have no debt even my house is paid off I made double payments.

The reason I want the RV is we want to travel for at least 5 years before we get too old to see North America we even plan on driving to Alaska. When we get too old we can sell the RV we can buy something.

I know someone who moved to Ecuador he said the cost of living is so good he has $5000 a month disposable income over what his cost of living is per month. He just became citizens now he can use their health care I guess. I rather stay in the US not into 3rd world living lot of corruption.

Sounds like a good plan. My neighbor is 10 years older than me and he had plans to travel but he is too sick now. He had to get surgery and ever since then he just aint the same. He is just waiting for the grim reaper now.

You are right about fixing things, no-one wants to fix anything. I am thinking a nice used travel trailer and I might do some limited traveling but i would keep my home base.

Good luck in your travels.
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Old 09-09-2019, 06:04 AM
 
65 posts, read 21,349 times
Reputation: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraR. View Post
If people are so poor to be living in a motorhome, which as stated is fun short term, then they should probably still be working. A job such as caregiving, or with the Developmentally Disabled population can provide a home &. bed to sleep a few days a week at no cost.

We knew a couple who for whatever reason, was almost indigent. They couldn't do much at 70, a bit frail.

They got jobs for the same Supportive Living Agency 2 days a week. Acting more in a grandparent role than an authoritative roll like all the other staff. Job Provided them two nights of sleeping in a bed, showering in the shower, a home like enviornment. Both said it made Motorhome living bearable since it wasn't 24/7. Paid min wage but most of it was saved so they were able to eventually obtain a tiny home saving up their income. They enjoy the "tiny home" just 550 sq ft... more than the motorhome. They rent the land for $100 a mo. w/water. Have dogs & a vegetable garden w/their own large shed.

This is ideal for those who find themselves poor later in life thus still need to save for a livable abode.

No one wants to live in an RV their whole life.When you become elderly, that becomes difficult
Can relate to this in part. I also spent some time working in home with developmentally challenged adults. Spent as much time at the home with clients as did living in my home. The wages were low, but the experience was very rewarding. After my wife passed many years ago, went on gradual downsizing, leaving NY (two hours from NYC) for more affordable environment (semi-rural Arizona). Lived in small house and kept my expenses very low. It was easily doable back then. These days cost of housing in that community makes it a tougher nut finacially. Growing up in military family (all the men in my family served) and moving frequently honed my ability to adapt to changes. My last two homes were under 750 SF including my present one at 650 SF. Small by most peoples standard, yet plenty of space for me and my limited possessions. Having less stuff and driving fifteen year old car suits me fine. Honestly find minimalism liberating (though my minimalism would be luxury for many in third world places - so I keep that perspective in mind). Even with no pension, am holding-off on SS. Am grateful county I live in offers seniors over 62, exemption from school taxes on property taxes. People I knew who owned RV's in Arizona sold them since I left that state. I appreciate people who live on less, repair things when possible rather than add more to landfills. Solar installation prices have fallen over years and knew more than a few who had them installed in Arizona. From what I heard from folks with solar installations in Arizona, you really need to stay put in your solar house for many years before your investment pays off. Suppose if selling house before solar system payed off, it would be considered a plus for home buyers, and perhaps you could add that outlay into your asking price. I hear young people grumbling they may never be able to purchase a house. I tell them to consider move to more affordable region. Think many young people would be quite please with very small house with small mortgage with minimal furnishings by Wayfair. Once people resolve to ignore keeping-up with the Jones's mentality - they can move on to frugality and affordability.

Last edited by trouillot; 09-09-2019 at 06:18 AM..
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Old 09-09-2019, 10:00 AM
Status: " ." (set 12 days ago)
 
163 posts, read 33,004 times
Reputation: 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClubMike View Post
Rv life is expensive, I thought about it at one time. Instead I bought a small (2 acre) place out in the country with a mobile home. It is important to choose the right area so taxes are low. Mine are 295 dollars a year. (Missouri Ozarks) So I have plenty of privacy and lots of room for my dog to run around. It only cost me 25 grand. Yeah I had to fix it up but it was not hard at all. Mobile homes are easy to work on.

For me the best way to a good retirement was a paid off country place. Now I just got to keep healthy and keep growing a huge tax free garden. I already have fruit trees producing and berry bushes doing their thing.

Think back a few generations ago they did not know what retirement was. So do not short change yourself you can find a way to retire even if you are broke. I did and it has worked well for me.
I love this post. Yes, a few generations ago, they hadn't heard of "retirement" No need to stress unless you are so broke you cannot even buy land to build or one that has an abode to fix up. Then maybe.



My favorite channel on youtube regarding homesteading is these guys. They are also from the Missouri Ozarks. https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...ions+homestead

Our 20 acres was 50k. Only about 5 acres is flat, the rest is a a hill. Two covered up gold mines discovered so far &3 springs from the ground but each may be from the gold mines we just learned. Water tested a while back, very clean.

We are quietly building a home on it right now. The Missouri Ozarks was our #1 choice if we had no children. It's hotter in the summer than our current spot. Our pop tax here in Calif is $9600 a year w/no homeowners insurance (not provided here) but we'll have a huge storage container to provide auto water in case of fire.

What's great about owning your own land vs mobile home living is some of what you stated. Growing food, dogs roam and your future projects. You are providing for yourself thus saving more $. A few suggestions is
1. Build a greenhouse. Then build a pond inside out of rocks & mortar/cement. Raise Goldfish to lower your dogfood bill.

2. Consider meat chickens or rabbits. We are mulling over this one right now. We will have chickens for sure, very low feed costs since they will free range.
3. Place meat in a bucket w/holes. Meat rots, maggots arise. Hang low for the chickens in their pen to eat.

Place one above the fishpond to feed the fish. Compost piles provide worms for both chicks & fish.
4. Rent out part of the property to an RVer.
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Old 09-09-2019, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Ohio
5,216 posts, read 1,893,752 times
Reputation: 4375
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
All great ideas up to the bolded part. A new car, if maintained, will last much longer than that. My husband is still driving my car I bought new 17 years ago. I just got a new one. I could have kept driving the old one, but he wanted it. It runs great, looks good, even with 170,000 miles on it. To me, a new car every 7 years would qualify as unnecessary spending on things I don't really need. But obviously it worked out for you, so that's cool.
Agree with this in general. Modern cars can easily last 15-20 years / 300,000 miles with regular maintenance. Just released my 14 year old Honda Pilot to a relative with 215,000 miles - still a perfectly fine car.

Plus unless you are doing a lot of traveling you probably are not piling up the miles like you are with a daily commute.
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Old 09-09-2019, 10:10 AM
Status: " ." (set 12 days ago)
 
163 posts, read 33,004 times
Reputation: 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by trouillot View Post
Can relate to this in part. I also spent some time working in home with developmentally challenged adults. Spent as much time at the home with clients as did living in my home. The wages were low, but the experience was very rewarding. After my wife passed many years ago, went on gradual downsizing, leaving NY (two hours from NYC) for more affordable environment (semi-rural Arizona). Lived in small house and kept my expenses very low. It was easily doable back then. These days cost of housing in that community makes it a tougher nut finacially. Growing up in military family (all the men in my family served) and moving frequently honed my ability to adapt to changes. My last two homes were under 750 SF including my present one at 650 SF. Small by most peoples standard, yet plenty of space for me and my limited possessions. Having less stuff and driving fifteen year old car suits me fine. Honestly find minimalism liberating (though my minimalism would be luxury for many in third world places - so I keep that perspective in mind). Even with no pension, am holding-off on SS. Am grateful county I live in offers seniors over 62, exemption from school taxes on property taxes. People I knew who owned RV's in Arizona sold them since I left that state. I appreciate people who live on less, repair things when possible rather than add more to landfills. Solar installation prices have fallen over years and knew more than a few who had them installed in Arizona. From what I heard from folks with solar installations in Arizona, you really need to stay put in your solar house for many years before your investment pays off. Suppose if selling house before solar system payed off, it would be considered a plus for home buyers, and perhaps you could add that outlay into your asking price. I hear young people grumbling they may never be able to purchase a house. I tell them to consider move to more affordable region. Think many young people would be quite please with very small house with small mortgage with minimal furnishings by Wayfair. Once people resolve to ignore keeping-up with the Jones's mentality - they can move on to frugality and affordability.
Wise words, esp. the bolded. Sounds like you did wonderfully. We have much of the same mentality. People don't realize an admiration for material things is actually painful though it gives some great satisfaction, it's a fake type of satisfaction. Living like normal people, simply, just allows you to be happier without the burden of "stuff". Living more like Adam & Eve, as originally intended.You seem to have your priorities in place.

Solar I am not familiar with beyond just buying panels and installing them. Old panels because they are much cheaper. The other traditional avenue seems very expensive and who knows if you'll still be living there decade later to reap the rewards.
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Old 09-09-2019, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Ohio
5,216 posts, read 1,893,752 times
Reputation: 4375
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClubMike View Post
Rv life is expensive, I thought about it at one time. Instead I bought a small (2 acre) place out in the country with a mobile home. It is important to choose the right area so taxes are low. Mine are 295 dollars a year. (Missouri Ozarks) So I have plenty of privacy and lots of room for my dog to run around. It only cost me 25 grand. Yeah I had to fix it up but it was not hard at all. Mobile homes are easy to work on.

For me the best way to a good retirement was a paid off country place. Now I just got to keep healthy and keep growing a huge tax free garden. I already have fruit trees producing and berry bushes doing their thing.

Think back a few generations ago they did not know what retirement was. So do not short change yourself you can find a way to retire even if you are broke. I did and it has worked well for me.
Go to Florida and check out retirement communities down there. Great majority are mobile homes. Inexpensive to purchase and maintain. And if you own land like you did and the zoning allows it you can always put a mobile home on the land. (Only caveat - not in Tornado alley).

People don't often consider this option because of peer pressure or the perceived stigma of living in a mobile home.
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Old 09-14-2019, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
6,122 posts, read 5,049,463 times
Reputation: 21012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
She's not hoarding worthless things like old food or trash like you see on the hoarder shows. It's just a lot of things that have some worth.

The room would be fine with the amount of stuff in it if it was organized properly. It really looks like someone just threw all the merchandise up in the air and it landed where it landed.



I don't disagree at all. The joy seems to be the act of shopping and purchasing. Once it's home, it might get used, it might not.

I used to do a lot of stuff from Goodwill that way. I'd buy a bunch of junk on impulse then sort it out when I got home. Some of the items were useful, others wound up at a thrift store later. I think all people do that to some degree, but she just buys expensive purses.
So she's actually not a hoarder, more of a shopaholic. I sometimes have a bit of that myself. For me it had to do with boredom, and a low level of "background anxiety". I realized that it occurred when I was bored at my job, and yet simultaneously I was worried about my job. I know some shopaholics are also suffering from depression. Shopping provides a momentary hit of endorphins when you feel you've found things that you want, and then attain them. It sounds like some of this might apply to your mom. I know it's a tough one to get someone else to see, but perhaps suggesting therapy???
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Old 09-14-2019, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
6,122 posts, read 5,049,463 times
Reputation: 21012
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraR. View Post
I love this post. Yes, a few generations ago, they hadn't heard of "retirement" No need to stress unless you are so broke you cannot even buy land to build or one that has an abode to fix up. Then maybe.



My favorite channel on youtube regarding homesteading is these guys. They are also from the Missouri Ozarks. https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...ions+homestead

Our 20 acres was 50k. Only about 5 acres is flat, the rest is a a hill. Two covered up gold mines discovered so far &3 springs from the ground but each may be from the gold mines we just learned. Water tested a while back, very clean.

We are quietly building a home on it right now. The Missouri Ozarks was our #1 choice if we had no children. It's hotter in the summer than our current spot. Our pop tax here in Calif is $9600 a year w/no homeowners insurance (not provided here) but we'll have a huge storage container to provide auto water in case of fire.

What's great about owning your own land vs mobile home living is some of what you stated. Growing food, dogs roam and your future projects. You are providing for yourself thus saving more $. A few suggestions is
1. Build a greenhouse. Then build a pond inside out of rocks & mortar/cement. Raise Goldfish to lower your dogfood bill.

2. Consider meat chickens or rabbits. We are mulling over this one right now. We will have chickens for sure, very low feed costs since they will free range.
3. Place meat in a bucket w/holes. Meat rots, maggots arise. Hang low for the chickens in their pen to eat.

Place one above the fishpond to feed the fish. Compost piles provide worms for both chicks & fish.
4. Rent out part of the property to an RVer.
I've seen some organic farmers do this with a flat, box-shaped wire mesh cage, mounted to a PVC frame, floating on pool noodles over the pond to create maggots for the fish. The person who made it used road kill as the meat, so totally free fish food. I wouldn't use goldfish, I'd use tilapia, so it's food for the pets and us. And I'd put the pond outside. In a greenhouse it would raise the humidity, and the stink from rotting meat, to unacceptable levels. Too much humidity in a green house can cause plant diseases like powdery mildew. All greenhouses would have some ventilation, of course, but I think that a pond might be too much for the ventilation too handle, and the stink would make caring for your vegetables unpleasant.

In addition to your compost pile, you can raise worms yourself, and compost kitchen waste, in a worm farm. There are lots of plans on-line, or even fancy ready-made ones like this one from Amazon...

https://www.amazon.com/VermiHut-Plus...s%2C162&sr=8-4
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Old 09-14-2019, 10:59 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
23,147 posts, read 40,672,933 times
Reputation: 24551
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraR. View Post
I love this post. Yes, a few generations ago, they hadn't heard of "retirement" .....

What's great about owning your own land vs mobile home living is some of what you stated. Growing food, dogs roam and your future projects. You are providing for yourself thus saving more $. A few suggestions is
1. Build a greenhouse. Then build a pond inside out of rocks & mortar/cement. Raise Goldfish to lower your dogfood bill.

2. Consider meat chickens or rabbits. We are mulling over this one right now. We will have chickens for sure, very low feed costs since they will free range.
3. Place meat in a bucket w/holes. Meat rots, maggots arise. Hang low for the chickens in their pen to eat.

Place one above the fishpond to feed the fish. Compost piles provide worms for both chicks & fish.
4. Rent out part of the property to an RVer.
Add..
  • Find a robust, long service vehicle, that runs on free fuel (Homebrew).... (VW diesel Rabbit for me, since 1976). Off season, Use green house to grow algae for fuel.
  • Run your tractor and genset on free fuel,
  • Heat living space via engine heat from genset
  • Sell excess power back to the utility
  • Use annualized solar (store summer heat for winter use)
  • Build a 20,000 ga rainwater recovery, and reuse gray water
  • Barter
  • Glean
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Old 09-14-2019, 03:49 PM
 
9,234 posts, read 5,320,961 times
Reputation: 10489
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraR. View Post
Our 20 acres was 50k. Only about 5 acres is flat, the rest is a a hill. Two covered up gold mines discovered so far &3 springs from the ground but each may be from the gold mines we just learned. Water tested a while back, very clean.

We are quietly building a home on it right now. The Missouri Ozarks was our #1 choice if we had no children. It's hotter in the summer than our current spot. Our pop tax here in Calif is $9600 a year w/no homeowners insurance (not provided here) but we'll have a huge storage container to provide auto water in case of fire.
.
I suspect we are in the same general area, Sara R.
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