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Old Yesterday, 10:31 AM
 
Location: SLC
512 posts, read 453,191 times
Reputation: 972

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With respect - I humbly suggest that the article is not about the age Cora decided to end her life intentionally but about the mutually enriching aspect of young-and-old relationships. The age someone mature and in full control of their senses decides that they have had enough of life is/should be their choice only.
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Old Yesterday, 10:46 AM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,953 posts, read 1,023,704 times
Reputation: 7135
I wonder if the author kept the grant money.


Cora seems to me to be an extraordinary women, but not because she was 77. She suffered a series of strokes which explains what the author attributes to her age.


The dancing had to do with rehabilitating herself, not an attempt to stave off old age.
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Old Yesterday, 11:02 AM
 
Location: SLC
512 posts, read 453,191 times
Reputation: 972
Not to take the thread off-track, dancing is recommended to stave off dementia. This advice was given by a neurologist with regards to a relative who is at an early stage. That said, if we anyone want to discuss the link between dancing and dementia - it should be on its own thread.

We agree that Cora seems like an extraordinary woman. That's what made this interaction interesting. When reading the article I wondered if there are many of older age who are extraordinary but that aspect is not picked up as often as it should and the gift is under-utilized.
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Old Yesterday, 11:22 AM
 
Location: equator
3,809 posts, read 1,669,547 times
Reputation: 9555
Paywall.

"Keep moving" sounds like exercise, not friendship?
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Old Yesterday, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,847 posts, read 3,364,960 times
Reputation: 12580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
The writer was 26 years old when she knew this lady. When most of us were that young, even 40 somethings seemed old

Wonder why she starved herself? Was she ill or was it suicide. Did she keep moving?

And the picture they used of a lady with a cane. I cannot think of one 77 year old person i know that uses a cane.

Too bad i probably won't be around when the writer has a different perspective and does an update.



I am 77 and planning on getting a cane soon. I'm having a balance problem and I need something to keep me steady.
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Old Yesterday, 12:32 PM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,953 posts, read 1,023,704 times
Reputation: 7135
Quote:
Originally Posted by kavm View Post
Not to take the thread off-track, dancing is recommended to stave off dementia. This advice was given by a neurologist with regards to a relative who is at an early stage. That said, if we anyone want to discuss the link between dancing and dementia - it should be on its own thread.

We agree that Cora seems like an extraordinary woman. That's what made this interaction interesting. When reading the article I wondered if there are many of older age who are extraordinary but that aspect is not picked up as often as it should and the gift is under-utilized.


"Her secret to recovering from multiple strokes? Turn on the radio and teach herself to dance...."
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Old Today, 10:32 AM
 
8,212 posts, read 5,191,520 times
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The proverbial goalposts keep moving. Not too terribly long ago, even reaching 65 was an event of some considerable achievement, while 50 was an age of seniority and a late-stage of one’s career. Now we read that 77 is but an intermediate stage in retirement, and the really advanced stage of fraught health and diminished prospects only comes at 90 or so. Soon perhaps we’ll start considering anyone of double-digit age as middle-aged, and the right to be considered a doddering pantaloon would only be bestowed at age 120.

I do not warmly greet this evolution. It means a longer working-journey and a more protracted period of striving, of going about our efforts and persisting in trappings of responsibility. It also requires for more money to be saved, and more concern for what one eats and the like. If life-expectancy were to be short, our expectations would be lower, with lower stress about when is time-enough, and it’s grown fair to graduate to the next stage, or to let go.
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Old Today, 11:04 AM
 
6,562 posts, read 5,245,134 times
Reputation: 13531
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
The proverbial goalposts keep moving. Not too terribly long ago, even reaching 65 was an event of some considerable achievement, while 50 was an age of seniority and a late-stage of ones career. Now we read that 77 is but an intermediate stage in retirement, and the really advanced stage of fraught health and diminished prospects only comes at 90 or so. Soon perhaps well start considering anyone of double-digit age as middle-aged, and the right to be considered a doddering pantaloon would only be bestowed at age 120.

I do not warmly greet this evolution. It means a longer working-journey and a more protracted period of striving, of going about our efforts and persisting in trappings of responsibility. It also requires for more money to be saved, and more concern for what one eats and the like. If life-expectancy were to be short, our expectations would be lower, with lower stress about when is time-enough, and its grown fair to graduate to the next stage, or to let go.
I'd be happy with 80

I have a group of great great aunts that were born in the 1860s - they lived to be almost 100! Just like thier mother. Scary.
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Old Today, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Haiku
4,797 posts, read 2,768,609 times
Reputation: 7009
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
My dad is 81 and my mom is 79. They are always on the move. My dad still works in his shop building things. He has also written a few books. My mom teaches kids how to make bread, pizza, and other things. I don't expect them to stop anytime soon. More and more people are living into there 100's making someone that is 77 young. I am 54 now and don't plan on retiring for another 25 years. If work is still fun I don't plan on stopping at least until age 85.
I don't get the sense of competition about who can work the longest or live the longest. What matters more is what you do with the years that you do have. Some people cram a lot of living into a smaller number of years. I don't see anything shameful or regretful about not living past 77 or whatever. Just live every day as if it is your last one.
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Old Today, 03:07 PM
Status: "The beach Life" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,901 posts, read 27,058,239 times
Reputation: 20705
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoByFour View Post
I don't get the sense of competition about who can work the longest or live the longest. What matters more is what you do with the years that you do have. Some people cram a lot of living into a smaller number of years. I don't see anything shameful or regretful about not living past 77 or whatever. Just live every day as if it is your last one.
My next door neighbor is 70. She spends her days watching TV and buying things online. I sure don't see that as living.

Living a long life, I don't see it as a competition. I see it as a way to get the most fulfillment and happiness out of the short time that we do have here.
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