U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-11-2019, 06:42 AM
 
154 posts, read 88,956 times
Reputation: 174

Advertisements

There's nothing wrong with working as long as you can, if that's what you want.

The main issues are whether you can tolerate the work (physically, emotionally, intellectually) and whether you're still employable on the open market.

Many people don't particularly enjoy their work and are looking forward to not having to work, and possibly moving from the location they were living and working in for decades.

Others simply cannot perform the work anymore, especially if the job is physical, due to things like arthritis.

Still others cannot get job offers, possibly due to age discrimination, possibly due to other factors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-11-2019, 06:47 AM
 
12,266 posts, read 5,372,476 times
Reputation: 19997
There's absolutely nothing wrong with continuing to work. My job is a physical one and I won't be able to do it full time much longer. The wear and tear on my body is taking a toll. I worry about getting hurt everyday. That said, when I start collecting at 62, I can still work 15-20 hours a week. That in itself will feel like I'm mostly retired compared to now so it's definitely an option.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,354 posts, read 18,147,137 times
Reputation: 28636
The reality of the situation is that many people don't have this option.

I've tread this ground before numerous times, but my father was laid off from his career manufacturing position during the Great Recession. He was around 50 then. Many of his coworkers were five to ten years older than him, and many of those people appeared to liquidate a lot of their savings to try and stay afloat in the immediate aftermath. Most never got career type jobs back - a lot of them landed in retail and temp work. Dad landed in a low paying call center job that paid about $15/hr and was a hundred mile roundtrip daily commute. That went on for about eight or nine years before he finally got a career job back.

My mom is 61 with a lot of health issues. She's retiring at 62 and taking SS immediately. I don't agree with this as they are in no place to retire financially, but she saw an exit ramp and is now taking it. Hopefully she'll get bored and work at least part-time after awhile.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 07:14 AM
 
10,643 posts, read 12,564,014 times
Reputation: 15040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
The reality of the situation is that many people don't have this option.
This!

Some people can't continue to work for health reasons OR lack of actual employment. At that point not being prepared can really wreck them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 07:32 AM
 
Location: SoCal
14,107 posts, read 6,752,709 times
Reputation: 10779
The point is when you are young and working, you want to built your skill set so you don’t have to be many people, you are just you. When my husband retired, out of the blue his old employer, more than 15 years ago, called him out of the blue offered him a consulting job. He was able working at home. He didn’t know what to charge them, so I helped him set therate, I thought it was generous, $250 for an hour and minimum 4 hours a day. They accepted the rate. But had I known the impact of his case, I would have set the rate higher.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,354 posts, read 18,147,137 times
Reputation: 28636
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
The point is when you are young and working, you want to built your skill set so you don’t have to be many people, you are just you. When my husband retired, out of the blue his old employer, more than 15 years ago, called him out of the blue offered him a consulting job. He was able working at home. He didn’t know what to charge them, so I helped him set therate, I thought it was generous, $250 for an hour and minimum 4 hours a day. They accepted the rate. But had I known the impact of his case, I would have set the rate higher.
You do the best you can.

I used to work for a Boston-based tech company that was a vendor to the investment banking industry. The window for success was very slim there. If you worked for more than three to five years in analyst role outside the company, they viewed you as stagnant. The culture was such that employees often threw each other under the bus in front of the bigger name clients trying to get an internal job with a hedge fund or wealth management group.

That company's product is at the "small end of the big fish" in its market, and while it is a "skill" you can take from place to place, the clients are really only in NYC, Chicago, Boston, and maybe San Francisco. When I left there, there were about fifty US customers.

The developers and engineers were, maybe, 30% American. The rest of the staff were mostly Chinese/Indian visa holders, and HQ didn't like to hire Americans. I don't remember an engineer over fifty.

If you had somehow managed to be in that industry for years, good luck finding another place to hire you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 08:12 AM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
32,418 posts, read 37,145,030 times
Reputation: 39360
People have ideas that things should be Black and White when there is a lot of grey in between.

There is few rules in life or retirement that must be followed 100%.

People who volunteer for No Pay are working in retirement also just to stay busy and give back to others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Colorado
134 posts, read 31,170 times
Reputation: 601
Some people work after retirement to make up a shortfall in income, others work to get out of the house for a few hours, and others work because it is so ingrained into their character. None of that is bad.

My dad worked at the grocery store down the street bagging groceries and later delivering books to schools during the summer for a school district. Trust me when I say that he did not need the money.

My retired brother teaches motorcycle riding on the week ends when he is not riding cross country with friends.

Other I know are working to put food on the table. All work has dignity.

Last edited by Deoge; 09-11-2019 at 08:40 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 09:09 AM
 
Location: La Jolla
352 posts, read 176,239 times
Reputation: 656
We have an engineer here at my company that is 77 and still working part time. He is a subject matter expert and our customers will pay top dollar for his advice. He only works when we have billable work for him. Most months it's probably a total of 40 to 60 hours.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 10:22 AM
 
9,805 posts, read 6,477,757 times
Reputation: 18580
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
"What is so bad about working a p/t job along with SS??"

Who says it is?? Work if you need to or want to. Nothing" bad" about it.

Exactly what I was going to say.


I was going to add, it's only bad if you have physical issues and have to work through them. But, you have to do what you have to do
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top