U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-11-2019, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,513 posts, read 685,396 times
Reputation: 3630

Advertisements

Work if you need to or if you just want to. I don't need to and I don't want to. I am 100 percent retired and already as busy as I want to be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-11-2019, 10:54 AM
 
7,290 posts, read 2,632,793 times
Reputation: 16612
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraR. View Post
Just my impression. Clearly it's false
It might not be so false.


There is a contingent of younger people out there, who want older people to retire already and get out of the workforce, so they can finally move in and move up in the workforce.


I would guess, depending on where you live, it might be buzz you hear a lot, or read in the paper, stuff like that.


And it might be more regional in some places than others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 11:24 AM
Status: " ." (set 5 days ago)
 
136 posts, read 27,054 times
Reputation: 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassybluesy View Post
It might not be so false.


There is a contingent of younger people out there, who want older people to retire already and get out of the workforce, so they can finally move in and move up in the workforce.


I would guess, depending on where you live, it might be buzz you hear a lot, or read in the paper, stuff like that.


And it might be more regional in some places than others.
Yes I hear this. It's California so very competitive but in all fairness, the high prices here lend itself to that
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 11:32 AM
Status: " ." (set 5 days ago)
 
136 posts, read 27,054 times
Reputation: 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
That is sad. It seems you are at retirement age, have spent a lifetime working and gained no or few skills that are employable? What did you do for a lifetime of work that left you without any skills of interest to employers? Did you invest in your career, your education, your technical skills?

When I was late in my career, I had the most opportunities ever. Even after retirement I got unsolicited job offers. All were way, way beyond minimum wage.
Do you know how this sounds? Brag much? sheesh

I don’t know how to answer these questions
Did I have Marketable Skills? Compared to who? Who says I am that bright to be able to develop marketable skills anyhow?

I owned a unique Marketing Company for a decade or so in my younger days
Health issues intervened so it was sold

Unexpected medical bills that held us back for yrs
Purchased a Forest Service Cabin to reduce living expenses living almost f/t in it
Kids loved it!! cramped but we spent alot of time outside.

Quality healthcare at a good price became THE most important
Then & in retirement
Did my homework and picked a company

Maybe I had no skills to speak of to overcome my woe's
Stuck in these lowly min wage jobs you point out
Not sure I could do much better, doubtful.

YET I chose to ensure at retirement & raising kids.
Our healthcare would be covered
No seizing our house
So we are doubly covered age 65+
What little I have, I keep
Never worked for much more than min wage after that
After paycheck deductions, there wasn’t much left.

Assets:
1. Our home construction complete in 8 weeks- 2bdrm/1ba
880 sq ft. 1/2 has 20ft ceilings + leaning attached Greenhouse+ 275 sq ft deck on 20 acres.
Value? Not alot here in Calif due to its location.
3. 55K HSA
4. 100k in savings
5. 2k at home stashed as emergency fund

Income:
DH-SS $1660 at 67. He’ll be 67 in a few yrs. He works seasonally
I earn $400-450 mo. + $1000 SS=$1425 mo
We'll live on $1660+$1000 SS= $2660


By moving, I will no longer do housekeeping as we save that by moving.
Otherwise I clean vacation homes very p/t
We’ve already raised chickens, grown gardens,
Now we’ll go self sufficient on a grander scale.
On this, I plan to work forever.

You be the judge on how unskilled and poor I am.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 01:34 PM
 
Location: annandale, va & slidell, la
7,786 posts, read 3,182,138 times
Reputation: 6615
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraR. View Post
Just curious.

If the average Social Security Check is around $1300-$1500, what is so bad about working a p/t job along with SS??

"In the period, 1.4 million women filed for Social Security benefits, and their average award was $1,231.50. Men, however, were awarded $1,583.77, on average." for the year 2017
https://www.fool.com/retirement/2017...urity-che.aspx


Half of Americans depend on SS for the majority of their income....https://www.cbpp.org/research/social...ocial-security


The jobs available tend to decrease, yes.
Security Guards, Caregivers, Fast Food, housekeeping, H&R Block, Retail, Seasonal jobs.

Is it often because Seniors have limited options when it comes to employment after a certain age?

Majority of jobs are minimum wage, a step down for most Seniors.


Why can't someone work 20 hrs a week, have all their needs met, and feel retired?

Is 20-25 hrs that much work for those who are on SS only and want to add to it?
It's a free country. Do what you must. I wake up every morning thankful we did what we had to do to retire comfortably.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,471 posts, read 45,435,392 times
Reputation: 13266
I have the option to cut back to just over 50% (20 hours) of work in my present job, which is a lot better job than anything Wally World or similar would offer me. For practical purposes, most people who do this work M-W-F, 8 hours, for a 24 hour week.



This also offers the possibility of returning to full time by agreement between worker and manager.


Can't do this and draw the pension at the same time though.



Of course there is nothing "wrong" with retiring from one job, and then working part time (or even full time) in another job. You are just going to have some people say "That does not fit my definition of retirement." You can ignore these people if you so choose.



Something else I might consider is to work during the outages at my friendly local nuclear power plant. There are always good paying temporary jobs for people who can pass a whiz-quiz, and in general understand how to conduct themselves in that environment. Although one is expected to show up on time and work damn hard, the outage needs to finish on time. You don't want whatever you are working on to become the undesignated "controlling path" work, particularly not if you are perceived to have caused that by not working all 3 shifts, etc. But there are always these sorts of seasonal employment available, it's not just nuclear.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 01:55 PM
 
163 posts, read 57,365 times
Reputation: 419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Effielin View Post
So my point is, you shouldn't PLAN on working til the bitter end.. it may not be possible.
I totally agree with this. Many people who have done a poor job of saving will say that they'll just work until they die and continue on as they have, saving little it at all. I think they say that to avoid criticism - as if it's a choice they made or is their "plan". There are people who have had life circumstances that blew up their savings plans - and I sympathize with them.

I think we're all different so it's a personal and individual decision how or if you retire. The ultimate is to have the financial means to make the choice of what you want to do with your retirement years. It's what we looked forward to all the years we worked.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 01:56 PM
 
7,213 posts, read 3,972,674 times
Reputation: 14840
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraR. View Post
Just curious.

If the average Social Security Check is around $1300-$1500, what is so bad about working a p/t job along with SS??

"In the period, 1.4 million women filed for Social Security benefits, and their average award was $1,231.50. Men, however, were awarded $1,583.77, on average." for the year 2017
https://www.fool.com/retirement/2017...urity-che.aspx


Half of Americans depend on SS for the majority of their income....https://www.cbpp.org/research/social...ocial-security


The jobs available tend to decrease, yes.
Security Guards, Caregivers, Fast Food, housekeeping, H&R Block, Retail, Seasonal jobs.

Is it often because Seniors have limited options when it comes to employment after a certain age?

Majority of jobs are minimum wage, a step down for most Seniors.


Why can't someone work 20 hrs a week, have all their needs met, and feel retired?

Is 20-25 hrs that much work for those who are on SS only and want to add to it?
There aren't a lot of jobs that want old people working part time jobs. There are some, but not many. THAT'S why so many youngish seniors don't work. It's hard enough to continue working your current full time job w/o getting fired (oh, I mean "laid off" wink wink).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
1,896 posts, read 2,340,371 times
Reputation: 5413
I was just listening to a financial retirement show on the radio and the speaker said that 75% of workers will lose their jobs before they get to retirement. They will lose their jobs through firings or health issues or even because their spouse suffers a serious illness or accident., none of these people had any idea it was going to happen.

Working longer most of the time will not be a choice the employee has.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2019, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
9,279 posts, read 8,023,199 times
Reputation: 12853
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraR. View Post
Just curious.

If the average Social Security Check is around $1300-$1500, what is so bad about working a p/t job along with SS??

"In the period, 1.4 million women filed for Social Security benefits, and their average award was $1,231.50. Men, however, were awarded $1,583.77, on average." for the year 2017
https://www.fool.com/retirement/2017...urity-che.aspx


Half of Americans depend on SS for the majority of their income....https://www.cbpp.org/research/social...ocial-security


The jobs available tend to decrease, yes.
Security Guards, Caregivers, Fast Food, housekeeping, H&R Block, Retail, Seasonal jobs.

Is it often because Seniors have limited options when it comes to employment after a certain age?

Majority of jobs are minimum wage, a step down for most Seniors.


Why can't someone work 20 hrs a week, have all their needs met, and feel retired?

Is 20-25 hrs that much work for those who are on SS only and want to add to it?
Liking/wanting to work is not the same as having to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top