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Old 09-22-2019, 02:25 PM
 
1,555 posts, read 766,233 times
Reputation: 4956

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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
have you ever lived in sc full time ? if not then how can you say ? if you have then kudos to you for skirting the
rim . the highways here are awful and pot holes ? they don't even fix those unless a politician ruins his tire on one otherwise it stays the way it is .
Lived in SC for a year. DH`s job made us come back to MA. Retired now, can`t wait too get out, and back down south.
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Old 09-22-2019, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,567 posts, read 3,214,046 times
Reputation: 10120
You will have to hunt harder to find a snow shovel in a store in SC. That is a good sign.

For me SC is too far north.
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Old 09-22-2019, 03:06 PM
 
1,699 posts, read 377,404 times
Reputation: 2086
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
i have lived in both and am currently in sc . don't move to sc . they tax your car as personal property and also your home as well . it stinks here . I loved ma when I lived there and if my hubs would live there I would be there but he wont so it is what it is . The people in sc are rather uneducated by my standards and the economy is based on two things colleges and tourism . The politicians and city officials are so crooked here . I'm ready to go now but we have to wait until my husband retires . We are retiring to Florida better tax breaks there . Please do yourself a favor and run from Sc. Get yourself to ma . I live in sc now and am dreading moving here everyday . The libraries are underfunded as well . Every time it comes to giving money to the library most of the voting population votes it down no money for the libraries .
57% of SC population has some college or higher; the US on average is 58% for some college or higher.
The SC economy is manufacturing, retail and then health care (in that order).
Those stats are but a google away.

Libraries all over the US are getting less funding because less people are using the library system.
I just joined the Horry County library system. It's not just about the physical books. I saw several recurring activities listed on the various branch calendars that interest me.

I find the weather much nicer in SC than I did in FL or TX.
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Old 09-22-2019, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,817 posts, read 4,953,233 times
Reputation: 6430
I have lived in MA for over 30 years and driven on average 35k miles per year on my personal car and have never blown a tire hitting a pot hole. The winters are tough sometimes but sometimes it is like perfect. Yes it gets cold but if you are retired and don't have to run off to work in the middle of a snowstorm or just after it you can take your time clearing it. Also if you have time and resources take a trip south for a few months. Close up the house. Rent in new and interesting places.

MA gets a bad rap with COL type folks. It really isn't that expensive to live here than anywhere else. Yes SC may have a lower property tax but they are not as generous with taxes as some people claim.


Quote:
https://www.retirementliving.com/tax...#SOUTHCAROLINA

SOUTH CAROLINA
Sales Taxes
State Sales Tax: 6% (prescription drugs and unprepared food items are exempt); Counties may impose an additional 1% local sales tax if voters in that county approve the tax. Generally, all retail sales are subject to the sales tax. Seniors 85 and older pay 5%.
Gasoline Tax: 35.15 cents/gallon (Includes all taxes)
Diesel Fuel Tax: 41.15 cents/gallon (Includes all taxes)
Cigarette Tax: 57 cents/pack of 20

Personal Income Taxes (Click here)
(Brackets, deductions, exemptions, and tax rate range)

Medical/Dental Deduction: Federal amount
Federal Income Tax Deduction: None
Retirement Income Taxes: Retirement income is taxed. Social Security is exempt. Under age 65, $3,000 in pension income is exempt. If you are 65 or older you may exempt $15,000 of retirement income. You can take this deduction for income received from any qualified retirement plan. If both spouses receive retirement income, each spouse is entitled to an individual deduction. The $15,000 deduction must be offset by any other retirement deduction that is claimed. A surviving spouse may continue to take a retirement deduction on behalf of the deceased spouse. Some taxpayers age 65 and older may not have to file a tax return if they meet certain conditions. For more information,click here.
Retired Military Pay: Retirees with 20 or more years of active duty can deduct up to $3,000 annually until age 65 and up to $10,000 per year after age 65. This deduction extends to the surviving spouse. Pension or retirement income received for time served in the National Guard or Reserve components is not taxable. Survivor benefits are taxed following federal tax rules.
Military Disability Retired Pay: Retirees who entered the military before Sept. 24, 1975, and members receiving disability retirements based on combat injuries or who could receive disability payments from the VA are covered by laws giving disability broad exemption from federal income tax. Most military retired pay based on service-related disabilities also is free from federal income tax, but there is no guarantee of total protection.
VA Disability Dependency and Indemnity Compensation: VA benefits are not taxable because they generally are for disabilities and are not subject to federal or state taxes.
Military SBP/SSBP/RCSBP/RSFPP: Generally subject to state taxes for those states with income tax. Check with state department of revenue office.

Property Taxes
Property tax is assessed and collected by local governments. Both real and personal property are subject to tax. The market value of a legal residence and up to 5 acres of surrounding land is assessed at 4%. For homeowners 65 and older, the state’s homestead exemption allows the first $50,000 of their property’s fair market value to be exempt from local property taxes. South Carolina imposes a casual excise tax of 5% on the fair market value of all motor vehicles, motorcycles, boats, motors and airplanes transferred between individuals. For more information, click here.

Inheritance and Estate Taxes
There is no inheritance tax or estate tax..

For further information, visit the South Carolina Department of Revenue site or 800-763-1295. If you are planning to move to South Carolina, click this link will provide you with some helpful information.
* State allows personal exemption or standard deductions as provided in the Internal Revenue Code.
Quote:

MASSACHUSETTS
Sales Taxes
State Sales Tax: 6.25% (food; prescription drugs; fuel costs; gas, oil, electricity; clothing costing up to $175, are exempt).
Gasoline Tax: 44.54 cents/gallon (Includes all taxes)
Diesel Fuel Tax: 50.54 cents/gallon (Includes all taxes)
Cigarette Tax: $3.51/pack of 20

Personal Income Taxes (Click here)
(Brackets, deductions, exemptions, and tax rate range)

Medical/Dental Deduction: Federal amount
Federal Income Tax Deduction: None
Retirement Income Taxes: Social Security, civil service, and state/local government pensions are exempt. Pension income from other state or local governments that do not tax pension income from Massachusetts public employees is exempt from Massachusetts taxable income.
Massachusetts income tax treatment of certain pension or retirement income prevents any state from taxing income from certain pensions and deferred compensation plans paid to individuals who are not residents of that state. Massachusetts already exempts much of the pension income paid to non-residents covered by P.L. 104-95, but the state exempts from taxation of some previously taxable pension income.
Effective Jan. 1, 2016, the tax rate has been lowered to 5.1% – on both earned income (salaries, wages, tips, commissions) and unearned (interest, dividends and capital gains). Certain capital gains are taxed at 12%. An individual first calculates gross income, which is income from whatever source derived including (but not limited to) the compensation for services, wages, pensions, business income, rents, royalties, dividends, interest, capital gains, alimony, annuities, etc. Certain business and personal deductions, as well as exemptions, may reduce gross income to arrive at that income subject to tax. For more information, click here.

Retired MilitaryPay: Not taxed.
Military Disability Retired Pay: Retirees who entered the military before Sept. 24, 1975, and members receiving disability retirements based on combat injuries or who could receive disability payments from the VA are covered by laws giving disability broad exemption from federal income tax. Most military retired pay based on service-related disabilities also is free from federal income tax, but there is no guarantee of total protection.
VA Disability Dependency and Indemnity Compensation: VA benefits are not taxable because they generally are for disabilities and are not subject to federal or state taxes.
Military SBP/SSBP/RCSBP/RSFPP: Generally subject to state taxes for those states with income tax. Check with state department of revenue office.

Property Taxes
Massachusetts does not provide for a general homestead exemption but does have a Homestead Act. The Homestead Act permits a homeowner who occupies a house as his/her principal residence to shield up to $500,000 in equity in that house from creditors. By simply filing a Declaration of Homestead with the appropriate Registry of Deeds, a homeowner may be able to protect his/her residence from the claim of a future creditor. The Homestead Act permits only one spouse to file for the equity protection if each has an ownership interest in the home. The protection offered to the disabled and the elderly is even more comprehensive because it allows a husband and wife who own their own home to each file for the $500,000 equity protection. Click for details.

Inheritance and Estate Taxes
There is no inheritance tax and a limited estate tax on estates valued at $1,000,000 or more.

Information for new residents can be found here.

For further information, visit the Massachusetts Department of Revenue site
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Old 09-22-2019, 05:32 PM
 
162 posts, read 95,105 times
Reputation: 188
SC and Mass are very different places.

I love the Berkshires and spend time there every summer - my cousin lived there for decades, her mother summered there for going on sixty years now, and my daughter goes to summer camp there.

The Berkshires have a beautiful landscape but a very harsh winter (5-6 months of snow and ice). In addition, it's an area young people are fleeing, due to lack of economic opportunities and a drug problem that's just depressing. Many of these young people are in fact moving to the Carolinas instead. When we were there this summer we must have seen "for sale" signs on every 4th or 5th house - lots of people are trying to cash out and leave the area.
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,644 posts, read 8,602,189 times
Reputation: 21111
Charleston, SC is very liberal and has excellent health care. Awesome weather, beautiful city, fantastic food, lovely people.

I wouldn't listen to anyone who doesn't have specific experience with South Carolina.
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Old 09-23-2019, 04:00 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,014 posts, read 19,146,977 times
Reputation: 24967
[quote=blueherons;56240216]Charleston, SC is very liberal and has excellent health care. Awesome weather, beautiful city, fantastic food, lovely people.

I wouldn't listen to anyone who doesn't have specific experience with South Carolina.[/QUOTE)




Exactly people who live somewhere for a yr and have never paid but 1yr in taxes . Don't know the area today . I have lived in the midlands part of sc going on 5 years and they are super on taxes . the roads stink potholes everywhere . Politicians are always coming up with ways to raise taxes and you get nothing for paying those taxes . why just this month we found out our county wont let us extend our deck without a contractor and blue prints . In other words if you do the work yourself you can only replace what is there . I cant stand a city or county or state that tells you what you can do with your own property . Don't move to the midlands portion of sc . I cant wait to get out and move back to florida .
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Old 09-23-2019, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts & Hilton Head, SC
7,721 posts, read 11,654,853 times
Reputation: 6131
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcandme View Post
Karen, I live in Ma, not far from the Berkshires. I am moving to SC in November to retire. The winters here are long and hard, especially as you age.....not to mention the cost of living.
Did you settle on a place? Did you decide on Bluffton?
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Old 09-23-2019, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Upstate
5,902 posts, read 6,702,275 times
Reputation: 4328
[quote=phonelady61;56240926]
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Charleston, SC is very liberal and has excellent health care. Awesome weather, beautiful city, fantastic food, lovely people.

I wouldn't listen to anyone who doesn't have specific experience with South Carolina.[/QUOTE)




Exactly people who live somewhere for a yr and have never paid but 1yr in taxes . Don't know the area today . I have lived in the midlands part of sc going on 5 years and they are super on taxes . the roads stink potholes everywhere . Politicians are always coming up with ways to raise taxes and you get nothing for paying those taxes . why just this month we found out our county wont let us extend our deck without a contractor and blue prints . In other words if you do the work yourself you can only replace what is there . I cant stand a city or county or state that tells you what you can do with your own property . Don't move to the midlands portion of sc . I cant wait to get out and move back to florida .
Can't make everyone happy. Florida is waiting for you.

While SC has it's problems, you see the same or similar complaints on every state forum in City-Data. For the OP's retirement income, they would live very, very nicely here in SC, plus there is so much to do here. Our arts program is growing as well. And I find our libraries are very good, just remember that we are a smaller state population wise, but moving up! We are not a bunch of rednecks as some here have mentioned. I'm conservative, but I welcome everyone as do most South Carolinians. SC is one of the fastest growing destination states for retirement. Obviously people are doing research about SC and STILL moving here in droves.

Best of luck in your retirement decision. If you would like more SC information, hope over to the state forum and we would be happy to help you out!
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:13 AM
 
14,637 posts, read 7,895,065 times
Reputation: 26811
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIslandMatt View Post
The Berkshires have a beautiful landscape but a very harsh winter (5-6 months of snow and ice). In addition, it's an area young people are fleeing, due to lack of economic opportunities and a drug problem that's just depressing. Many of these young people are in fact moving to the Carolinas instead. When we were there this summer we must have seen "for sale" signs on every 4th or 5th house - lots of people are trying to cash out and leave the area.

Huh? You're describing the climate of northern Vermont, not the Berkshires. If you're in the desirable part close to the Mass Pike (Great Barrington, Stockbridge, Lenox), it's unusual to have much in the way of snow pack before Christmas and it's normally melted by April 1.
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