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Old Yesterday, 01:46 PM
 
8,349 posts, read 12,097,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
You will find the majority of C-D posters contrary to the idea of international living / retirement. Largely due to demographic of C-D retirement forum. They will squash the thread and diss anyone with positive comments / experience (heaven forbid something other than a 'cookie cutter USA 'retirement' dream / nightmare) Venture to say 95% of the naysayers have never lived overseas, and would never consider it (but 'post-about-it' ) Some here have tried it and decided it was not for them (expected since it is a different culture which does NOT cater to USA people or ideas).
Squash the thread?

Why do you keep posting this ridiculous nonsense in Every. Single. Thread., Every. Single. Time. international retirement is brought up? It is not true now and never has been true. (At least during the 10+ years that I've been participating here.)
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Old Yesterday, 01:49 PM
 
6,646 posts, read 5,304,559 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrandmaChris View Post
Funny you say that. I moved to Texas in 1987 at the age of 22 when I was with the USAF - prior to that CA for first 8 years - then Michigan until 19 was stationed in Japan for 3 years - Left Texas at 47 for DH transfer to CA - then spent 3 1/2 years in AZ. Texas got in my blood - all four of my children were born in Del Rio, Texas - DH got to Texas a year after I did - so respectively 24 years for me and 23 years for me - Most of my maturing years - We both want to retire in Texas - Actually - hopefully very soon we will purchase our retirement home as an investment - I retire in 7 years.

So to the OP - NOPE - never in my wildest dreams would I retire overseas somewhere.
Lots of Air Force people end up staying here in Texas.

So you were at Laughlin. It might be kind of empty out there, but it is an interesting empty. I love those big open places.

I would love to move to south padre island. Love the sound of the surf.
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Old Yesterday, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Kountze, Texas
313 posts, read 47,972 times
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^^^^ Yes, I was at Laughlin AFB Hospital for 5 years - and I'm not surprised that losts of USAF retire in TX. I loved our view off the back porch - lightening storms over Lake Amistad and the sun setting behind the Sleeping Lady mountains in Mexico.
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Old Yesterday, 03:06 PM
 
8,301 posts, read 5,235,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by josie13 View Post
One parent was Irish, the other Canadian. Thatís why I carry three passports. I prefer to keep my options open in these troubled times. I live not far from the border of British Columbia.
Slightly off-topic, but I can't help wondering: aren't any regulars on this Forum foreign-born? Anyone?

Here's the question. Suppose that somebody is say Chinese, or Filipino, or Bulgarian or whatever... born and raised there, then arriving in the US as a student, and staying here via F-1... HB-1... Green Card... Naturalization. 30-40 years pass, and retirement beckons. Then what? Remain in the US, or return to one's "native" country? To me that seems like a pressing and fundamental topic. But it never (to my awareness) gets discussed.
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Old Yesterday, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,038 posts, read 1,421,934 times
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I thought about Bavaria, Switzerland, Austria and even California, but my wife is from Texas so Iím stuck here.
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Old Yesterday, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,038 posts, read 1,421,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Slightly off-topic, but I can't help wondering: aren't any regulars on this Forum foreign-born? Anyone?

Here's the question. Suppose that somebody is say Chinese, or Filipino, or Bulgarian or whatever... born and raised there, then arriving in the US as a student, and staying here via F-1... HB-1... Green Card... Naturalization. 30-40 years pass, and retirement beckons. Then what? Remain in the US, or return to one's "native" country? To me that seems like a pressing and fundamental topic. But it never (to my awareness) gets discussed.
After 30 Ė 40 years you are more American and also most likely a U.S. citizen. Your native country would be the U.S. and you would have little in common with your place of birth.
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Old Yesterday, 03:24 PM
 
3,118 posts, read 1,116,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txfriend View Post
After 30 Ė 40 years you are more American and also most likely a U.S. citizen. Your native country would be the U.S. and you would have little in common with your place of birth.
Exactly.
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Old Yesterday, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Miami, The Magic City
3,030 posts, read 2,124,700 times
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Yes...I said if a certain person were elected I would leave the country and followed through on my threat by moving to Miami

I could consider living in Spain or Rio de Janeiro.
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Old Yesterday, 03:35 PM
 
8,301 posts, read 5,235,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txfriend View Post
After 30 Ė 40 years you are more American and also most likely a U.S. citizen. Your native country would be the U.S. and you would have little in common with your place of birth.
But I wonder about that. To give a less specialized example, suppose that a person born and raised in NYC majored in petroleum engineering, ending up working in rural Texas. This person never culturally fit in, but abided the new environment from career-considerations, and desire to avoid antagonizing the locals. Decades pass, and the retirement portfolio has done OK. Should our hero move back to Brooklyn?

Back to my specific scenario, it is entirely possible to be politically integrated but not culturally integrated. One reason that certain cultures or parts of America get so vehemently bashed on C-D, is the presumption, that the various ethnic groups haven't sufficiently integrated. Rather than joining the melting-pot, they've remained cocooned in a transplanted facsimile of their "native" environment. Without endorsing or condemning this trend, I ask: what should a person, who does practice this sort of behavior, seriously consider doing in retirement? If one's cultural, emotional and to large extent social affinities are elsewhere, ought one to follow said affinities, now that the financial freedom enables doing so?
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Old Yesterday, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,038 posts, read 1,421,934 times
Reputation: 6945
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
But I wonder about that. To give a less specialized example, suppose that a person born and raised in NYC majored in petroleum engineering, ending up working in rural Texas. This person never culturally fit in, but abided the new environment from career-considerations, and desire to avoid antagonizing the locals. Decades pass, and the retirement portfolio has done OK. Should our hero move back to Brooklyn?

Back to my specific scenario, it is entirely possible to be politically integrated but not culturally integrated. One reason that certain cultures or parts of America get so vehemently bashed on C-D, is the presumption, that the various ethnic groups haven't sufficiently integrated. Rather than joining the melting-pot, they've remained cocooned in a transplanted facsimile of their "native" environment. Without endorsing or condemning this trend, I ask: what should a person, who does practice this sort of behavior, seriously consider doing in retirement? If one's cultural, emotional and to large extent social affinities are elsewhere, ought one to follow said affinities, now that the financial freedom enables doing so?
I will not argue that, if a person after 30 or 40 years is still practicing his native believes and feels they would be more content in the pace of birth, by all means, consider relocating.

I also believe in the saying that you canít go home again. After 40 years away, everything you remembered about the homeland will have changed and you would feel lost.
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