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Old 09-25-2019, 03:50 PM
 
3,118 posts, read 1,117,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
But I wonder about that. To give a less specialized example, suppose that a person born and raised in NYC majored in petroleum engineering, ending up working in rural Texas. This person never culturally fit in, but abided the new environment from career-considerations, and desire to avoid antagonizing the locals. Decades pass, and the retirement portfolio has done OK. Should our hero move back to Brooklyn?

Back to my specific scenario, it is entirely possible to be politically integrated but not culturally integrated. One reason that certain cultures or parts of America get so vehemently bashed on C-D, is the presumption, that the various ethnic groups haven't sufficiently integrated. Rather than joining the melting-pot, they've remained cocooned in a transplanted facsimile of their "native" environment. Without endorsing or condemning this trend, I ask: what should a person, who does practice this sort of behavior, seriously consider doing in retirement? If one's cultural, emotional and to large extent social affinities are elsewhere, ought one to follow said affinities, now that the financial freedom enables doing so?
I would say that if you have lived in the States for that long you can’t help to have culturally adapted in some ways to the US. The culture you left behind has not remained in a bubble and has changed and so has the person here even if they lived in a cultural cocoon because that is a somewhat Americanized version of their original culture. So to an American not from that culture it always appears as those people have not adapted but to the people from the countries where those emigrated from those people have changed and are American versions of their culture.

No matter how “cocoon” they have been in America their culture is not the same any longer as those back home.
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Old 09-25-2019, 04:00 PM
 
Location: La Isla Encanta, Puerto Rico
1,152 posts, read 3,060,271 times
Reputation: 1348
Default fluency ??!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kavm View Post
Have considered Germany. Still interested but will likely not do it. The reasons - (a) Tax implications on our retirement portfolio are substantial, (b) one of us (me) is not terribly fluent in German - and while it can be improved, have doubts whether I can get sufficient proficiency, (c) health insurance is difficult to get for retirees (from non-EU nations or German returnees). Weather can also be a factor as recycled mentioned earlier - though it’s not high on our list (yet).
I've been to Germany several times, the first in 1991 and being an English speaker wasn't even a problem in eastern Germany the year after the Iron Curtain fell. Last time I was there nearly EVERYBODY spoke English (about 5 years ago). Have you even visited there? I think you worrying about a NON-problem! Anyway, German has many common words with English. Forget about learning the grammar, it's impossible for an American unless you are a language genius but it's very easy to speak an understandable pigeon German to get around.
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Old 09-25-2019, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,635 posts, read 8,585,642 times
Reputation: 21080
We are actually looking at Spain.

Because my husband and I both have four year degrees, we can teach English as a foreign language part time which will cover all our bills and can save our retirement for a rainy day.
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Old 09-25-2019, 05:45 PM
 
Location: SoCal
14,233 posts, read 6,830,169 times
Reputation: 11007
I like Spain a lot. Maybe LTC there is cheaper. Might as well go where food is delicious.
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Old 09-25-2019, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Bakersfield, Ca
1,884 posts, read 1,407,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Why would your U.S. citizenship be "let go"? It stays with you unless you renounce it.
That's what I meant . I just used a different term . I would let it go .
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Old 09-25-2019, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Bakersfield, Ca
1,884 posts, read 1,407,832 times
Reputation: 4064
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Do you ever leave Texas? In my experience, most Texans don't want to even leave the state!
I sure did , I could not wait to get out of there , same with my sister , we left home at 17 and by 18 I was in Europe and she was in Asia .
She is in SF now and I stay around LA/Seattle usually but some people just aren't a good fit for Tx .


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hefe View Post
I'm not going to assume to answer for the person you asked this of but the 2 reasons one would typically "let go" of US citizenship are: 1 - political reasons; 2 - tax reasons: the US typically has taxation agreements with most countries one would consider moving to I believe, but the US is the only country that taxes its citizens no matter what country they live in & no matter how long one has been gone.

So some countries that offer tax exemptions to expats in order to get them to retire & reside there, usually more affluent than the locals & putting more currency into local economies, this perk may be nullified by still having to pay US taxes.
All of the above , yes . personal , political and tax .
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Old 09-25-2019, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,993 posts, read 1,935,650 times
Reputation: 9141
The ideal situation is to spend enough time abroad that you would have a realistic sense of what it would be like to live there. Then if you ever have a strong incentive/desire to do it, you won't need to go to a forum liike this and do the soul-searching.
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Old 09-25-2019, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Central Illinois -
22,128 posts, read 14,674,162 times
Reputation: 15296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekker99 View Post
I retired in the Socialist Republic of California and want to move *back* to the US - it'll mean my retirement dollars will go further!
Quit bellyaching and move!

I can't wait to get out of my present location but I have to wait to get my pension in 3.5 years, I wish I could retire early but that aint happening.
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Old 09-25-2019, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,968 posts, read 10,026,081 times
Reputation: 10166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Why would your U.S. citizenship be "let go"? It stays with you unless you renounce it.
Technically, if one has a foreign domicile, that voids U.S. citizenship. In fact, in the States, all U.S. citizens can only "reside" in a state. If they were domiciled as free inhabitants, they'd cease being U.S. citizens and only be American nationals.
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Old 09-25-2019, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,728 posts, read 21,614,841 times
Reputation: 24761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Screenwriter70 View Post
Hell no, but if I did I'd have to consider Canada or somewhere in Europe. I wouldn't be happy in a 2nd or 3rd world country and see no reason to make myself miserable just to stretch a few dollars. It's only money & you can't take it with you...
The lowering of the fertility rate in many 3rd world countries is going to make it increasingly expensive to live in these places. Mexico is on its way to have a large aging population of its own, with a fertility rate in Mexico headed for 2.0.
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