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Old 09-26-2019, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,055 posts, read 1,430,837 times
Reputation: 6990

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Slightly off-topic, but I can't help wondering: aren't any regulars on this Forum foreign-born? Anyone?

Here's the question. Suppose that somebody is say Chinese, or Filipino, or Bulgarian or whatever... born and raised there, then arriving in the US as a student, and staying here via F-1... HB-1... Green Card... Naturalization. 30-40 years pass, and retirement beckons. Then what? Remain in the US, or return to one's "native" country? To me that seems like a pressing and fundamental topic. But it never (to my awareness) gets discussed.
By the way, I fit your profile exactly with one exception I’ve been here for over 60 years arriving as a teenager. I was drafted in 1959 and served in the military for almost 9 years. I became a citizen in 1968.
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Old 09-26-2019, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Houston
23,041 posts, read 11,908,342 times
Reputation: 9364
Moving to Cebu next year. Cost of healthcare and caretaker for disabled wife to expensive here. The wife is a dual citizen of United States and Philippines.
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Old 09-26-2019, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
5,087 posts, read 1,973,647 times
Reputation: 9318
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
You can check out Sugar and Spice, in Boquete, Panama on FB.

I was in Boquete in 1991, loved it and checked it out. Didn't see any sign of expats, people were surprised I even asked. I look at it with a certain longing, but a lot has happened since then.
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Old 09-26-2019, 09:18 PM
 
Location: SLC
540 posts, read 464,784 times
Reputation: 1027
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
Technically, if one has a foreign domicile, that voids U.S. citizenship. In fact, in the States, all U.S. citizens can only "reside" in a state. If they were domiciled as free inhabitants, they'd cease being U.S. citizens and only be American nationals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
Since you did not provide any facts in rebuttal, beyond your opinion, it's insufficient.

Do states know the difference between an inhabitant and a resident?
" No inhabitant of this state shall be molested in person or property ... on account of religious opinions..."
- - - Georgia Constitution, Article 1, Sec.1, Paragraph 4

“ Citizens, protection of. All citizens of the United States, resident in this state, are hereby declared citizens of this state ; and it shall be the duty of the General Assembly to enact such laws as will protect them in the full enjoyment of the rights, privileges, and immunities due to such citizenship.”
- - - Georgia Constitution, Article 1, Sec.3, Paragraph 7
Uh OH! U.S. citizens can only be RESIDENTS in the state. So who are those "inhabitants" who shall not be molested?
(In case you decide to establish a domicile in a state, you become 'foreign' to the U.S. government and its U.S. citizenship. Remember, the U.S. government is a foreign corporation with respect to a state. U.S. citizens are 'domiciled' in Federal territory.)

In the 1993 edition of the 1992 US Code (50 titles), I found only ONE reference to American nationals.
Title 8, USC Sec. 1502. Certificate of nationality issued by the Secretary of State for person not a naturalized citizen of the United States for use in proceedings of a foreign state.

“ The Secretary of State is authorized to issue, in his discretion and in accordance with rules and regulations prescribed by him, a certificate of nationality for any person not a naturalized citizen of the United States who presents satisfactory evidence that he is an American national and that such certificate is needed for use in judicial or administrative proceedings in a foreign state. Such certificate shall be solely for the use in the case for which it was issued and shall be transmitted by the Secretary of State through appropriate channels to the judicial or administrative officers of the foreign state in which it is to be used.”
That is ALL that the Federal government will say about American nationals.
(An American national is NOT synonymous with a U.S. national, as defined in Title 8 of the U.S. code.)

P.S.- the State department will graciously issue passports for non-citizen American nationals.
This is so much misinformation that it is not even funny - much as the author insists on it with some legalistic argumentation. No idea what is being gained here - except spread of misinformation, whether it is to promote a political philosophy or simply misguided remains unclear. It could be amateur practice of law - but in is nothing but misinformation spread with assertiveness rather than basis in law or legal or national practice.

Since the poster complained about a lack of rebuttal - I provide the links below (two of which are US Government websites):

https://www.usa.gov/renounce-lose-citizenship

https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclope...r-country.html

https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclope...s-citizen.html

Note - the poster does not bring up dual nationality, so that is irrelevant to this rebuttal. The following link is mainly as it gives the detailed legal references about the way one can lose the US citizenship. The decision to permanently reside in another country is not even remotely among them.

https://travel.state.gov/content/tra...tionality.html

Last edited by kavm; 09-26-2019 at 09:36 PM..
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Old 09-27-2019, 03:12 AM
 
13,221 posts, read 14,453,722 times
Reputation: 36680
Quote:
Originally Posted by txfriend View Post
After 30 – 40 years you are more American and also most likely a U.S. citizen. Your native country would be the U.S. and you would have little in common with your place of birth.
I am inclined to think the above would be the case. I am an American who has lived for twenty years in Europe and I cannot imagine willingly returning to the U.S. I have had visits from U.S. friends over the past couple of years, and I was surprised at how so little of the way they live their lives had any resonance with me.
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Old 09-27-2019, 04:16 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
5,087 posts, read 1,973,647 times
Reputation: 9318
Quote:
“ Citizens, protection of. All citizens of the United States, resident in this state, are hereby declared citizens of this state
What do you not understand? A citizen of Georgia is defined as a citizen of the USA who has established legal residence in Georgia, probably defined in another act. Not all inhabitants meet that test, so may not be entitled to the privileges of citizenship.

An inhabitant is a person who meets the residence test, regardless of citizenship.
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Old 09-27-2019, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Guadalajara, MX
6,313 posts, read 3,085,998 times
Reputation: 12130
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
Technically, if one has a foreign domicile, that voids U.S. citizenship. In fact, in the States, all U.S. citizens can only "reside" in a state. If they were domiciled as free inhabitants, they'd cease being U.S. citizens and only be American nationals.
Hah ha, no. Where do folks come up with this garbage?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
Since you did not provide any facts in rebuttal, beyond your opinion, it's insufficient.
That wall of text you posted is no different than what your average sovereign citizen does when trying to prove their incorrect beliefs, regurgitating without having the education or experience to understand how it is interpreted or applied.



Quote:
Originally Posted by dothetwist View Post
That's a load of baloney! Unless you renounce (and that's neither an easy nor cheap route), you are a US citizen, allowed to vote in US elections from your foreign country. You can even have dual citizenship and still be a US citizen. I do not understand why posters post crap they know nothing about. Makes all of their posts suspect.
Exactly this. I'd invite jetgraphics to move to a house in Mexico and declare this domicile voids citizenship, then cease filing federal income taxes. They would learn a thing or two about how reality works versus whatever SovCit web page they scraped their logic from.
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Old 09-27-2019, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Guadalajara, MX
6,313 posts, read 3,085,998 times
Reputation: 12130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
And oh yes, on the food. We'll be in Spain this winter and I can't wait to have some decent food!
This is what makes the case for places like Thailand, Mexico, Singapore, etc...
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Old 09-27-2019, 08:41 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
11,144 posts, read 5,214,420 times
Reputation: 23170
I considered Ecuador at one time but in the end I didn't want to live there by myself as a 60 year old woman with previous cancer issues.
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Old 09-27-2019, 09:15 AM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,168 posts, read 17,454,918 times
Reputation: 10033
One of my (Former) Co/Worker retired to Belize.
(Well he did work from "Home" for a few years before he retired). He "Lived" in Texas and would Telecommute to work, They kept (not sure if they still do since they are Retired now) a condo near Houston, as there US work Address, and he would fly back to the states few times per year. (I Think it was a Visa Requirement).

But they had a nice home on the top floor of a hotel, (They owned the hotel, but contracted out the management of it) Great View, Mostly English Speaking Population, Stable Government, Low Cost of living, High Speed Internet, US (VOIP Phone number),

Who would not like that.
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