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Old Yesterday, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
57,587 posts, read 55,794,964 times
Reputation: 68628

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
It's kind of interesting to me that people rarely talk about anticipating change.

Your story is not uncommon, though to you it feels intensely personal because it's happening to you. Perking along in the job for years, then bam! Something happens -- unhelpful/unpleasant new manager, company is bought by a behemoth, there's a RIF that doubles the remaining peoples' workload, budget cuts eliminate freebies that kept the workers happy, whatever -- and suddenly retirement looks like an escape into freedom you were previously willing to postpone.

But for just about every job there ever was, nothing stays the same forever. Change is actually predictable. You just don't know the why or the when of it.
That was my experience, too. Since our ultimate leaders and decision-makers were political hacks, the rules and goals and processes and budget fluctuations changed with whomever held the offices that governed us.

I saw someone who retired recently, three years after me, and she was saying how this had changed and that had changed, and she didn't want to deal with it anymore. The truth is, she's now old enough to collect her pension. Changes happened constantly, but now she could walk away from it.

I had one coworker who retired in 2006 and left a long email to those he considered his friends in the agency outlining every wrong turn he thought had been taken in the past 20 years--and he made some very valid points--but letting everyone know he was done and walking away and never coming back. Indeed, he went to a completely unrelated career after retirement and as far as I know, isn't in touch with anyone from our department.
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Old Yesterday, 01:32 PM
 
Location: SoCal
14,206 posts, read 6,818,024 times
Reputation: 10964
Just act as if you don’t care. See what they can do to you. I told my next level of supervisor to fire me. They didn’t dare. I’m still laughing about it. They had some young intern took a picture of me napping, my back was turning to him, my feet was up. That’s not napping. Just resting my feet.
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Old Yesterday, 01:55 PM
 
283 posts, read 102,302 times
Reputation: 1339
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallstaff View Post
Ha yes. One regret I have from all those years working is giving a damn so much. If I had it to do over again I wouldn't care so much or work so hard. It seems to work for other people ha ha

Correct! I can't think of any job I ever had that really made much difference. Worries about workplace nonsense are a waste of time. I am sorry I did not realize this earlier, and concentrate on early retirement. Many of my friends are already retired and I am still working. I hope to go soon, and never work a job again. As for the OP, I long ago disengaged from my current job. There will be no protest here, just a farewell wave.
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Old Yesterday, 02:05 PM
 
8,040 posts, read 4,569,332 times
Reputation: 11999
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
Just act as if you don’t care. See what they can do to you. I told my next level of supervisor to fire me. They didn’t dare. I’m still laughing about it. They had some young intern took a picture of me napping, my back was turning to him, my feet was up. That’s not napping. Just resting my feet.
That raises an interesting question. Can you collect unemployment if you're eligible for retirement?
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Old Yesterday, 02:06 PM
 
Location: SoCal
14,206 posts, read 6,818,024 times
Reputation: 10964
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
That raises an interesting question. Can you collect unemployment if you're eligible for retirement?
If you get laid off, yes. As long as you don’t get fired. But always ask HR regarding fired or laid off. Eligible for retirement has nothing to it.
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Old Yesterday, 02:07 PM
 
8,040 posts, read 4,569,332 times
Reputation: 11999
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Don't do anything that will cause regrets...

On Leaving a LT employment / previously GOOD job with long term relationships (in company and with suppliers / ex-coworkers / officials)
(FIRST - before flaming out)
  • Take a 'clean' break (to clear your mind for the correct decision)
  • Think it through +/-
  • Make an exit plan that suits YOU (and you will be a 'hero', not a loser)
  • Exit when it makes sense to YOUR past, present and future: (Consider reading Die Broke... about emotionally quitting your job but stay put (or leaving if that is the better plan)
  • Paid Vacation was nice As were many other perks
  • Chances are slim they will force you out. Make the remaining days, months, yrs pass by on YOUR terms.
On Retirement success (QoL)
  • Tons of great things to do that can be a better use of your time than employment
  • No shortage of benefits (except HC)
  • Freedom for choice each moment
  • Can engage in the lives / progress / assistance of others
  • Can improve your own situation
  • Many great job offers pop up AFTER retirement (Freedom from employment)
Risks:
  • Burning bridges
  • Aging (health and attitude)
  • CHANGE (big change from 'planned days' to freedom (+/-))
  • Second Thoughts... Cannot 'recreate' a great job that you found to be a temporary PITA and left prematurely.


When it is right, you will know it, feel it, and execute it.

Probably not singing Johnny Paycheck...

BTDT, not smart, not gallant, not a good way to be 'set-free' (if it was truly a good job), unnecessary lasting effects (definitely not worth the 'moment-of-freedom' feeling)

Not intended to be applied to a crummy job, abusive boss, dirt bag situation.

think about it
ACT appropriate to your value set / historical service.
Great post! "Hero" and not "loser" in whose eyes, though; my own?
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Old Yesterday, 02:45 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
23,161 posts, read 40,684,513 times
Reputation: 24562
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Great post! "Hero" and not "loser" in whose eyes, though; my own?
Yes, only "Hero in your own eyes".(able to live with the PERMANENT choice you just made. (and try to leave an acceptable taste in the mouths of important co-workers stuck behind, especially the 'youth').

Bosses take this (your exit) far more personal than we realize, They are likely insecure, especially if losing 'ole-timers'. (irreplaceable experience and knowledge and contacts and training). My last boss chased away 7 'ole-timers' in a dept of 9. He is still clueless, but very 'hurt', in more ways than just the great employees leaving to pursue 'nothing'. (No one left for a better job, but to GET-OUT of an impossible but previously excellent job.)
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Old Yesterday, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,029 posts, read 1,420,802 times
Reputation: 6945
I was 49 and had no thought about retirement until the corporation released a memo about retirement and who could qualify. The retirement package was great and I would qualify by just 8 days according to my birthday and the number of years worked. I took a 5-year leave of absence and retired at 55.
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Old Yesterday, 02:50 PM
 
8,040 posts, read 4,569,332 times
Reputation: 11999
"...(and try to leave an acceptable taste in the mouths of important co-workers stuck behind, especially the 'youth')."

That's the puzzling part. Why should I care?

I agree, too, about the out-of-his depth, half-our-age bosses; insecure, threatened, and clueless. But this type would rather have inexperienced and incompetent young employees that they can mold in their image than capable old-timers they can't.
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Old Yesterday, 02:52 PM
Status: "Move along." (set 7 days ago)
 
9,045 posts, read 11,053,737 times
Reputation: 13135
I think when people are closer to retirement, they can take very little BS anymore. Probably a lot of people who retire much earlier than they originally thought because of this.
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