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Old Today, 08:30 AM
 
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Was anyone's planned retirement suddenly triggered -- or at least greatly accelerated -- by a particular event or an upheaval in the workplace that you just weren't able to roll with? I can tell, with changes in mine, that I'm about to hit that wall and am beginning to fantasize about just walking out. It would benefit me financially to hang in there a bit longer to fully maximize my pension package, but I'm under no obligation to and think it's time to run a cost/benefit analysis. That is, more money in the monthly check versus months of what is beginning to feel like torture. Economics aside, it would feel so liberating and empowering to just pull the plug with no warning. The last job is the one job you can quit without repercussions. Who's done that? Share your story.

Last edited by otterhere; Today at 08:39 AM..
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Old Today, 08:38 AM
 
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Are these events changes you do not like or something more? When I approached retirement age and made a decision to retire in the near future, my attitude changed greatly. I stopped caring about the company policies, goals and plans. I continued to do my job but was not emotionally involved. Maybe that would work for you. It sounds that continuing to work is in your best interest.
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Old Today, 08:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Are these events changes you do not like or something more? When I approached retirement age and made a decision to retire in the near future, my attitude changed greatly. I stopped caring about the company policies, goals and plans. I continued to do my job but was not emotionally involved. Maybe that would work for you. It sounds that continuing to work is in your best interest.
I have been in that place for quite a while now and, had the status quo continued, could have happily (maybe too happily and comfortably; I was wondering if I'd be able to pull the plug on schedule) gone on for the planned period, but changes in management are suddenly making things uncomfortable and unpleasant. The Peter Principle in practice. I thought I was beyond caring, but the atmosphere is beginning to affect me personally. Is the extra income -- granted, for life -- worth the stress? I'm taking it on a day-by-day basis at present. Just curious if anyone has ever walked out on impulse and into the sunset. I mean, into retirement.
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Old Today, 09:28 AM
 
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Not me. I had planned early on in my career to retire early...55 was my goal and I met it.
3 months after I hit 55 I officially retired. Been 7 years now and I have no regrets at all.
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Old Today, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
8,446 posts, read 5,182,008 times
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It's kind of interesting to me that people rarely talk about anticipating change.

Your story is not uncommon, though to you it feels intensely personal because it's happening to you. Perking along in the job for years, then bam! Something happens -- unhelpful/unpleasant new manager, company is bought by a behemoth, there's a RIF that doubles the remaining peoples' workload, budget cuts eliminate freebies that kept the workers happy, whatever -- and suddenly retirement looks like an escape into freedom you were previously willing to postpone.

But for just about every job there ever was, nothing stays the same forever. Change is actually predictable. You just don't know the why or the when of it.
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Old Today, 09:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
It's kind of interesting to me that people rarely talk about anticipating change.

Your story is not uncommon, though to you it feels intensely personal because it's happening to you. Perking along in the job for years, then bam! Something happens -- unhelpful/unpleasant new manager, company is bought by a behemoth, there's a RIF that doubles the remaining peoples' workload, budget cuts eliminate freebies that kept the workers happy, whatever -- and suddenly retirement looks like an escape into freedom you were previously willing to postpone.

But for just about every job there ever was, nothing stays the same forever. Change is actually predictable. You just don't know the why or the when of it.
Yes. This has pushed me over an emotional edge I didn't realize I was on the precipice of.
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Old Today, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
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For me it was a gradual change, doing more with less, and having an absent manager. I was part of a field service organization with no office closer than 900 miles. The manager could not read a map to determine who was where and compare it to where someone was needed.

Then the corporate entity that owned our organization got caught cooking the books and got heavily fined. In order to survive the company decided to sell our division to another company. The process had been going on for over a year, after it was decided who would buy us, and no one from management had come around to the field for a meet and greet or policy discussion.

I was 66.5 when I pulled the trigger. I had hoped to go until about 69 to secure a better financial situation, but with a bad knee, and all the above, I retired.
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Old Today, 10:11 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
For me it was a gradual change, doing more with less, and having an absent manager. I was part of a field service organization with no office closer than 900 miles. The manager could not read a map to determine who was where and compare it to where someone was needed.

Then the corporate entity that owned our organization got caught cooking the books and got heavily fined. In order to survive the company decided to sell our division to another company. The process had been going on for over a year, after it was decided who would buy us, and no one from management had come around to the field for a meet and greet or policy discussion.

I was 66.5 when I pulled the trigger. I had hoped to go until about 69 to secure a better financial situation, but with a bad knee, and all the above, I retired.
Any regrets now that you're living more happily but with less money than you otherwise would have? Maybe it's not even a choice once you reach that point, though. Once you're done, you're done.
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Old Today, 10:13 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
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I took the first retirement train out of my position to get out from under an increasingly unethical department head. I don't consider it a protest retirement -- it was for my own benefit (in many ways). I was not leaving to make a statement, but it looked like that to some people. Anyone could see that things were clearly not going to get any better. The retirement door opened at the right time and I exited at age 52.
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Old Today, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,574 posts, read 4,297,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Any regrets now that you're living more happily but with less money than you otherwise would have? Maybe it's not even a choice once you reach that point, though. Once you're done, you're done.
No regrets. The management change, with the unknown future, plus the knee (my job included a lot of kneeling on hard floors) was too much. The stress of not knowing if I would be home at a reasonable time was a long term negative, that only the income could compensate for. However that income was not what it used to be. The last 15 years I seldom went over the cap for SS withholding, whereas early on in my career I had often exceeded it.
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