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Old 09-27-2019, 01:42 PM
Status: "Re-re-edit" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
4,518 posts, read 2,085,680 times
Reputation: 3467

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The greatest generation had a Oregon coastal house. Nice but a lot of work because it was a 1919 home. Even had a stable and franklin stove and a wood stove-oven. Its now sister's home.

We just visit DS home in Seattle, we live 15 miles east, in Redmond. I may do this today/weekend since DS will be out and my spouse is visiting her sister.
Flights from SeaTac is fairly inexpensive. $49 (Alaska) to SJC to go to Monterey CA.
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Old 09-27-2019, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
8,493 posts, read 5,218,266 times
Reputation: 31313
Quote:
Originally Posted by barb712 View Post
If the expenditure of money, time and energy maintaining two homes and traveling back and forth are things you can and want to handle, more power to you. When I was in my 50s, it sounded like a romantic fantasy type thing. Now, in my 60s, I get exhausted just thinking about it.
Traveling back and forth between houses doesn’t bother me. I enjoy it. Sometimes I pick up a one-way rental at the airport and use the trip as an extended test drive. (I really liked the RAV4. The Dodge Journey was dog poop. The cruise control was broken and the back hatch wouldn’t open for love or money.)

What bothers me and drains my energy is something else entirely.
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Old 09-27-2019, 09:39 PM
 
Location: State of Denial
1,982 posts, read 1,015,967 times
Reputation: 10539
Our RV has been our "second home" for the past 10 summers. The first five of those summers we hit the road for 4-5 months and travelled all over the country. The past five summers, we've plopped down for four months in a nice over-55 RV park in the Blue Ridge of North Narrowlina. Heated pool, workout room, fun activities, near to everything.


We're in our 70's and I think we're nearing the end of the RVing journey. It's been great, but I'm leaning toward buying a small place up here and spending half the year here and the other half back home in Florida in the stick-and-brick. I think we have one more year in the RV left. I looked idly at places this summer. Unfortunately, what I want I can't afford and what I can afford I don't want. I think next year, I'll look "seriously".
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Old 09-27-2019, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
8,493 posts, read 5,218,266 times
Reputation: 31313
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamary1 View Post
Our RV has been our "second home" for the past 10 summers. The first five of those summers we hit the road for 4-5 months and travelled all over the country. The past five summers, we've plopped down for four months in a nice over-55 RV park in the Blue Ridge of North Narrowlina. Heated pool, workout room, fun activities, near to everything.

The spouse wants to know if you take a toad with you.
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Old 09-28-2019, 12:49 AM
 
8,354 posts, read 12,106,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
Are you asking if they should HAVE a 2nd home? Or if they should buy or rent that home once they decide to have it? Those are 2 different questions.
And whether someone should have a pied--terre would be a third question, because a pied--terre isn't simply a multi-bedroom second home down south somewhere to snowbird, or out in the country somewhere, and it definitely isn't a motorhome, lol. A pied--terre is generally a small place in a major city that is used occasionally such as on weekends.

In the New York area, for example, it would apply to people who might live in CT or NJ and commute into Manhattan for work, but have a small apartment for weekend use when they want to take in the city life.

In my case, I think our one-bedroom condo on Miami Beach qualifies as a pied--terre. We have a house in the City of Miami that is our primary residence, but when we attend concerts, shows or other events on Miami Beach, we'll spend the night or weekend in our condo rather than driving back across the causeway to the mainland.
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Old 09-28-2019, 05:05 AM
 
728 posts, read 225,852 times
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I’d buy a small condo close to the beach. Then someone else worries about the outside etc and I could be there for as long or as often as I wanted. This idea that someone is too old is ridiculous. If a person can afford it, go for it! Enjoy your life and stop dwelling on what could happen tomorrow. Because what could happen tomorrow could happen today even if you were 30. There arent any quarantees.
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Old Today, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,971 posts, read 27,150,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddeemo View Post
A pied-a-terre is normally just a temporary place to stay in the city, not a vacation home. Most I know own a condo as thier pied-a-terre so no real maintenance needed. I would probably own if the cost is close to the same, more upside.

From Wikipedia
I have been hearing about employed people that live in a home maybe hours away from work and renting or buying a small place near work.

We have several at the Hospital that live in Bakersfield where they can buy more home, and rent a place in Oxnard or Ventura, or maybe just rent a room near work.

One Doctor that I know works in the ER. He will work three or four shifts in the ER staying in the Doctors sleep room, not really his own place. Then after his last shift or after he is rested up, he drives to the local GA airport and flies home to Palm Springs.

To the extreme, I know a guy that my wife grew up with. He is a Fire fighter in Los Angeles. The family sold their LA area home and moved to Tennessee. He flies out for work, completes his 10 or so days a month, and heads home.
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Old Today, 09:27 AM
 
2,811 posts, read 765,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
You're soooo right, Rational. Nothing is a hassle if you have the cash to pay for someone or some "service" to handle it for you. Take your pick, I guess - your money or your time - but it will definitely be one or the other and no way around that.
Perhaps I misunderstood waltcolorado's post to which I replied. Waltcolorado was not complaining about how much money it takes to maintain a 2nd house (everyone knows it is expensive.) He was pointing out what he perceives to be hassle involved in doing so.
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Old Today, 09:33 AM
 
2,811 posts, read 765,839 times
Reputation: 4961
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
In the New York area, for example, it would apply to people who might live in CT or NJ and commute into Manhattan for work, but have a small apartment for weekend use when they want to take in the city life.
I know people who do the reverse: Monday morning they commute into Manhattan, work & crash in their tiny apartment in the city, and Friday afternoon they depart for their large comfortable home outside NY, where they keep their belongings and live.
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Old Today, 10:22 AM
 
2,811 posts, read 765,839 times
Reputation: 4961
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
One Doctor that I know works in the ER. He will work three or four shifts in the ER staying in the Doctors sleep room, not really his own place. Then after his last shift or after he is rested up, he drives to the local GA airport and flies home to Palm Springs.

To the extreme, I know a guy that my wife grew up with. He is a Fire fighter in Los Angeles. The family sold their LA area home and moved to Tennessee. He flies out for work, completes his 10 or so days a month, and heads home.
I read about a member of the Menlo Park Fire Department. Menlo Park is a nice part of Silicon Valley, and is very expensive, even by Silicon Valley standards. When he's between shifts he sleeps on a couch in the public area of the fire station, only leaving when he wasn't on call for an extended period.

The Menlo Park Fire Chief was quoted in the article saying over the years he's learned such arrangements can be the sign of a failing marriage, and he hoped to get the firefighter some help or counseling. "Everything's fine," replied the firefighter, "I just can't afford to live in California." His wife, children and home were in Reno NV. Many first responders fall into that camp. A quick Zillow search shows this house in Meno Park: a 3bd/3ba 1470 sf house on a 2356 sf lot (that's about 1/20th of an acre). It's yours for a mere $2,228,000.

The nearby towns of Palo Alto, Atherton, Woodside, Portola Valley, Mountain View, Los Altos Hills, and Redwood City are all similarly expensive (and most are more so).

The elected politicians and city managers of The City of Menlo Park were exceptionally worried about first responders not living close enough to help in the event of a catastrophe such as a major earthquake or firestorm or the San Bruno natural gas explosion.

Menlo Park decided to give all first responders extra money to live in town or close - as much as an extra $250,000 per year (tax protected). It varies by grade level, and even with that extra cash, many first responders still do not live nearby.
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