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Old Yesterday, 10:19 PM
 
14,636 posts, read 7,868,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
Everyone is obliged to spend part of their life generating wealth, to live in economic society. When you are retired, you are no longer bound to that trade-off of hours and days of your life.

If you were lucky enough to be who you are and get paid for it, that doesn't give you the right to look down your nose at people who had to sell their soul. And, if you were a huckster and loved it, it's your call whether to be proud of yourself.
Half the country doesnt generate any wealth in their lifetime. When they can no longer work, they exist on a Social Security check.

I think this thread is nonsense. My rule was always to work hard midweek doing my best to be the highest performer in the company and then play hard from 5:00pm Friday until Monday morning. I used company holidays and my vacation time to their fullest. I ski. I typically skied every weekend from Halloween until mid-May. Id call in powder day for big winter storms. Id then switch over to summer sailing, bicycling, and beach. Work is important but I always defined my life by my non-work lifestyle. Superficial maybe but its how Ive always lived my life and my decades-long friendships are mostly with people with overlapping lifestyles
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Old Today, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
18,393 posts, read 11,626,970 times
Reputation: 38802
Quote:
Originally Posted by FREE866 View Post
"Spend time defining who you are. You get to decide who you are after you retire. When you were working, your company, position & coworkers limited your self-definition. View retirement an opportunity to think through who you want to be."


Breaking the umbilical cord form corporate America has been a form of a spiritual awakening!
I feel sorry for anyone who thinks this way. Some of us love(d) our jobs, and they were an extension of who we are.

I've retired twice, it sucked, now I am back to work and love it. You can only play with your toys so much, you can only sleep in so much, and not only do we start to slip mentally, our physical health suffers as well, due to a lack of exercise.

I guess there are people who are ok in retirement, good for them. But when you work and interact with others all day long, and solve problems all day long, that is my reward. (and the money ain't all bad either)
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Old Today, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,994 posts, read 1,935,650 times
Reputation: 9146
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
I feel sorry for anyone who thinks this way. Some of us love(d) our jobs, and they were an extension of who we are.

I've retired twice, it sucked, now I am back to work and love it. You can only play with your toys so much, you can only sleep in so much, and not only do we start to slip mentally, our physical health suffers as well, due to a lack of exercise.

I guess there are people who are ok in retirement, good for them. But when you work and interact with others all day long, and solve problems all day long, that is my reward. (and the money ain't all bad either)
Well, I feel sorry for you. Pretending, to retain your sanity, that ringing up groceries (or whatever) all day long is spiritually rewarding. I'm also sorry that when you were free to choose rewarding pastime, you drew a blank, and had to go back and have someone lead and direct you to fulfillment.

Just three posts back, I warned that there would be people looking down their noses at the rest of us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Half the country doesn’t generate any wealth in their lifetime.
Why would the captains of industry pay most of them several million dollars, without realizing they didn't generate any wealth? Explain your uniquer economic theory.

Last edited by cebuan; Today at 04:04 AM..
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Old Today, 04:10 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,576 posts, read 3,769,844 times
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Maybe it is just an issue with semantics and how the OP phrased their comment.

Personally, I believe all of us knew who were were even before we entered the workforce. But job and family obligations may have prevented us from fully living in that mode. The freedom of retirement then allows us to do far more of what other obligations limited us from enjoying previously.
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Old Today, 06:48 AM
 
1,081 posts, read 510,294 times
Reputation: 1531
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
I feel sorry for anyone who thinks this way. Some of us love(d) our jobs, and they were an extension of who we are.

I've retired twice, it sucked, now I am back to work and love it. You can only play with your toys so much, you can only sleep in so much, and not only do we start to slip mentally, our physical health suffers as well, due to a lack of exercise.

I guess there are people who are ok in retirement, good for them. But when you work and interact with others all day long, and solve problems all day long, that is my reward. (and the money ain't all bad either)

seriously, some of you guys are just really weird lol


curious to where you and others live on here....


I'm in NYC...



what makes you think people who are retired don't exercise?


and not having to "working and interacting with others all day" is exactly why retirement is so great lol


I can take humans in small doses and retirement allows that for me...and as I stated earlier I do numerous volunteer projects to fulfill me...in addition to now reading like 2 books a month, spending more time with my elderly parents, taking courses, exercising more...the list is endless...
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Old Today, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,550 posts, read 18,276,350 times
Reputation: 28847
Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
OP's post is very good. Most people get a significant part of their identity based on their occupation or their employer. This is why some have a real problem with retirement, and why some work way past the average retirement age. Lots of people's ego comes from their work. For some its hard to abandon that part of their identity.
A lot of people "work to live" and derive their identity from their hobbies, family, and lifestyle outside of work.

I've never had a job that really had much impact on my identity beyond being able to fund the lifestyle things that do drive my identity. I don't hate what I do, but it certainly doesn't define me.
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Old Today, 07:15 AM
 
6,574 posts, read 4,933,209 times
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Some of the people who have posted on this thread have done a good job of defining who they are. They are argumentative and downright nasty individuals.

It seems to me that the concept of this thread is pretty simple. Prior to retirement, work often takes up a great deal of our time and limits what we can do. That in no way means we had empty wasted lives. Upon retirement most of us have way more freedom to do things that were impossible or difficult before. We can set new goals and undertake new experiences and if not at least we have more time for what interested us before retirement.

I see a lot of people slip into retirement with no idea what they want to do or accomplish with their time. There are others who never accomplished much, never had strong interests or goals. That is likely to continue the same way during retirement. Others of us go into retirement with a full agenda. My wife and I sold the house and took off in an RV. We worked on developing skills in photography while we visited national parks and other spectacular areas. We resettled after a couple of years of travel and again redefined our goals and changed our activities. Both of us still do photography. My wife is a trained artist and always painted. I am learning. We are both involved with several art galleries and with a group of photographers and creative visual artists. My wife does a lot of writing, mostly poetry and now children's books. I do archery, outdoors and at an indoor range. We have taken numerous courses in our areas of interest.
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Old Today, 07:25 AM
 
1,081 posts, read 510,294 times
Reputation: 1531
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Some of the people who have posted on this thread have done a good job of defining who they are. They are argumentative and downright nasty individuals.

It seems to me that the concept of this thread is pretty simple. Prior to retirement, work often takes up a great deal of our time and limits what we can do. That in no way means we had empty wasted lives. Upon retirement most of us have way more freedom to do things that were impossible or difficult before. We can set new goals and undertake new experiences and if not at least we have more time for what interested us before retirement.

I see a lot of people slip into retirement with no idea what they want to do or accomplish with their time. There are others who never accomplished much, never had strong interests or goals. That is likely to continue the same way during retirement. Others of us go into retirement with a full agenda. My wife and I sold the house and took off in an RV. We worked on developing skills in photography while we visited national parks and other spectacular areas. We resettled after a couple of years of travel and again redefined our goals and changed our activities. Both of us still do photography. My wife is a trained artist and always painted. I am learning. We are both involved with several art galleries and with a group of photographers and creative visual artists. My wife does a lot of writing, mostly poetry and now children's books. I do archery, outdoors and at an indoor range. We have taken numerous courses in our areas of interest.

Exactly!


It's almost like people took offense to the quote.
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Old Today, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,550 posts, read 18,276,350 times
Reputation: 28847
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
I feel sorry for anyone who thinks this way. Some of us love(d) our jobs, and they were an extension of who we are.

I've retired twice, it sucked, now I am back to work and love it. You can only play with your toys so much, you can only sleep in so much, and not only do we start to slip mentally, our physical health suffers as well, due to a lack of exercise.

I guess there are people who are ok in retirement, good for them. But when you work and interact with others all day long, and solve problems all day long, that is my reward. (and the money ain't all bad either)
Not everyone has a physical job where they get exercise. I have a sedentary "stare at the computer job." Unless I make it a point to walk at lunch or run over to Planet Fitness, I get very little exercise during working hours. I'd be in much better shape if I wasn't tethered here eight hours a day.
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Old Today, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
18,393 posts, read 11,626,970 times
Reputation: 38802
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
Well, I feel sorry for you. Pretending, to retain your sanity, that ringing up groceries (or whatever) all day long is spiritually rewarding. I'm also sorry that when you were free to choose rewarding pastime, you drew a blank, and had to go back and have someone lead and direct you to fulfillment.

Just three posts back, I warned that there would be people looking down their noses at the rest of us.



Why would the captains of industry pay most of them several million dollars, without realizing they didn't generate any wealth? Explain your uniquer economic theory.

Just because YOU hated going to work at some mindless job every day, you have to understand that some of us have CAREERS, not JOBS. There is a big difference. If you work in some cubicle, doing menial labor, that I can understand, but you also have to accept that some people perform meaningful, productive work at their employment, and actually find it rewarding.

Sorry that your job was so bad, maybe you should have taken a different career path early on, like we did.
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