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Old 10-04-2019, 08:32 AM
 
1,027 posts, read 467,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edglock21 View Post
This is sad to read. Not about him though, about your attitude towards it.

Perhaps, to him, these things are giving him hope or memories of fonder times. Of things he can no longer do, in body, but in his mind he sees (or remembers) himself doing and it gives him joy.

The books I can understand - but the fishing gear, the golf equipment...

It's sad you only see the "useless garbage" and not his lifelong hobbies.

.
Have you ever dealt with the aftermath of a hoarder? Hoarders don’t just buy one item, they typically “collect” multiples of the same thing. Multiple fishing poles, sets of clubs, books, plastic models, all the same. Their mental illness prevents them from seeing the ridiculous futility of their actions.
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Old 10-04-2019, 12:47 PM
 
2,344 posts, read 1,347,587 times
Reputation: 1585
I am not retired yet, but this particular topic applies to younger people.

I used to sweat blood before I would give up old books, including text books that became outdated years before. Eventually I disciplined myself to donate to the library, giving away books I had not looked at in years. The old text books I ended up tossing.

A few years ago I went through my closet and realized that half of my old clothes no longer fit, so I donated them.

A few years ago I contacted an outfit that hauls away your old junk for a fee. They probably hauled away-literally-a ton of old junk. That included not only stuff I never use, but stuff that was broken and useless.

I realize now that very few items have sentimental value to me.

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 10-04-2019 at 01:49 PM..
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Old 10-04-2019, 05:36 PM
 
1,262 posts, read 714,011 times
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DH and I went through our work materials and finally got rid of most of it, but it was difficult. We did keep college and graduate school diplomas and I kept my state licenses (although they are now outdated).

One thing our adult kids really liked was a copy of our resumes because it summarized our careers for them.

Another cleanup I did was old yearbooks as this was back in the days when you reserved whole pages for your best friends, who joyfully wrote about all our fun times. Yikes, I don’t want my kids reading about old boyfriends and other adventures we had! Gave me some good laughs, though, as I razorbladed some pages out.

Some things probably should have been kept, though, as my daughter was disappointed that she could not get extra credit in a math class for bringing in an old slide rule that DH had let go earlier.
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Old 10-04-2019, 08:39 PM
 
Location: california
5,837 posts, read 5,017,365 times
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IF there is a CME or EMP all those books would be worth pure gold.
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Old 10-04-2019, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Rust'n in Tustin
2,483 posts, read 2,566,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arleigh View Post
IF there is a CME or EMP all those books would be worth pure gold.
Yeah, worth the same as old vcr tapes
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Old 10-04-2019, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Rust'n in Tustin
2,483 posts, read 2,566,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
If you cherish it then keep it. There are plenty of companies out there that can take away all that stuff after you are gone.

Let that "treasure" turn into junk after you are long gone.
And your children will curse you for keeping all that crap.
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Old 10-05-2019, 08:26 AM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,393 posts, read 2,973,153 times
Reputation: 5270
Quote:
Originally Posted by shamrock4 View Post
DH and I went through our work materials and finally got rid of most of it, but it was difficult. We did keep college and graduate school diplomas and I kept my state licenses (although they are now outdated).

One thing our adult kids really liked was a copy of our resumes because it summarized our careers for them.

Another cleanup I did was old yearbooks as this was back in the days when you reserved whole pages for your best friends, who joyfully wrote about all our fun times. Yikes, I don’t want my kids reading about old boyfriends and other adventures we had! Gave me some good laughs, though, as I razorbladed some pages out.

Some things probably should have been kept, though, as my daughter was disappointed that she could not get extra credit in a math class for bringing in an old slide rule that DH had let go earlier.
But you bring up a really good point. Your kids may be writing your obituary. Having your work resume, class yearbooks might be really helpful.....
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Old 10-05-2019, 08:40 AM
 
Location: SoCal
14,344 posts, read 6,912,307 times
Reputation: 11150
Quote:
Originally Posted by edglock21 View Post
This is sad to read. Not about him though, about your attitude towards it.

Perhaps, to him, these things are giving him hope or memories of fonder times. Of things he can no longer do, in body, but in his mind he sees (or remembers) himself doing and it gives him joy.

The books I can understand - but the fishing gear, the golf equipment...

It's sad you only see the "useless garbage" and not his lifelong hobbies.

.
One reason I still have my husband’s windsurfing gear in our garage. I will hang the surf board to the wall.
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Old 10-05-2019, 09:32 AM
Status: "Be open to thinking good things will happen." (set 7 days ago)
 
509 posts, read 1,507,457 times
Reputation: 404
Quote:
Originally Posted by MI-Roger View Post
I have a 1996 NEC Handbook, 3-ring hard cover, fully tabbed! What do I do with this? I haven't needed it or used it since 1999.
I just Googled this book and found that folks have them listed for sale on eBay.
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Old 10-05-2019, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Hamburg, Deutschland
1,242 posts, read 625,820 times
Reputation: 1844
Quote:
Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
And your children will curse you for keeping all that crap.
When you are dead, you will not hear the curses anyway. And as long as you are alive, you can still have the pleasure of keeping you old beloved things and spare the pain of parting with them.
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