U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Today, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,571 posts, read 3,768,037 times
Reputation: 5109

Advertisements

I graduated from Engineering School 45 years ago with arm loads of text books. The useless ones were sold or donated, reference manuals took their place, job responsibility changes thinned the pile but many still remain.

I cotinnue to dispose of unnecessary tomes as retirement day approaches (6 to 9 months out) but the emotional attachment to the survivors remain. I know what has to be done and I keep marching in that direction in spite of the pain.

Am I alone in this reluctance?

Last edited by PNW-type-gal; Today at 06:16 PM.. Reason: fixed typo
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Today, 10:48 AM
 
Location: USA
1,170 posts, read 467,267 times
Reputation: 3238
My wife and I attempt to "clean like we died" every couple of years. Anything that we haven't touched in the last year is subject to being sold, donated or trashed unless there's a strong sentimental value. Work-related stuff is the first to go. Work does not define me - it's always been simply an means to an end - living a good, decent, enjoyable life. There are also hobby items that I plan to use more heavily once retired. Those items are retained.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 10:53 AM
 
Location: equator
3,925 posts, read 1,710,941 times
Reputation: 9801
Sure. It killed DH to give up his tools for his solar business. Made a friend happy though.

We have a few toolboxes though. He did struggle with letting go of his electrical code books!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,571 posts, read 3,768,037 times
Reputation: 5109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
.....He did struggle with letting go of his electrical code books!
I have a 1996 NEC Handbook, 3-ring hard cover, fully tabbed! What do I do with this? I haven't needed it or used it since 1999.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:19 AM
 
Location: California
4,585 posts, read 5,559,555 times
Reputation: 9886
I found that once retired, my idea of what was valuable changed. So wait a while after you retire to see how you feel about all that weight pulling you down.

The technology is now available online resulting in fewer of the younger ones buying old books so get rid of the past, you can't go back and who would want to?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,572 posts, read 7,873,053 times
Reputation: 4077
Since you are still working, there may be some things that are still needed for the time being. In the last year that I was working, I separated everything I had used within the past year from the rest. Anything not used in the past year got disposed of or given away. That cut down the remaining stuff to the essentials, and eliminated 80-90 percent. You have to start somewhere, and that is one way to make a dent in the stuff. Then what remains is a much smaller amount of things that you can sort further after retirement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Rust'n in Tustin
2,472 posts, read 2,547,215 times
Reputation: 4832
Quote:
Originally Posted by MI-Roger View Post
I have a 1996 NEC Handbook, 3-ring hard cover, fully tabbed! What do I do with this? I haven't needed it or used it since 1999.
Trash can?

It's useless.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Colorado
181 posts, read 39,133 times
Reputation: 793
I do not hoard and my house has been referred to as looking like a model home. I do have some of my stuff packed neatly in the garage or in the basement that should be discarded but makes me happy. I have resigned myself to the fact that my kids or my wife will have to discard of this stuff when I die. I can live with that (pun intended).

Keep the stuff you want and reevaluate every 5 years. I have a SCUBA weight belt that I just do not want to discard although I don't ever see me using it again. If you wanted it I would give it to you in a heartbeat, but I will not be the one throwing it out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,901 posts, read 3,400,456 times
Reputation: 12730
When I left my last medical transcription job I had a ton of reference books and hand-written, cross-reference books that I had no problem donating to whoever wanted them. Transcription can be a pretty difficult job when you are listening to a heavy accent or even a doctor who speaks well but tends to cut off part of a word. And some of the technical terms can be mind-boggling, too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:54 AM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,456 posts, read 15,573,580 times
Reputation: 9764
He kept his PE book (he had his PE in EE and ME) because of all the useful reference materials, plus some machining/metallurgy reference books he still uses. Maybe two shelves of books. He does the occasional consulting for a company he used to work for although they've pretty much outsourced all of their engineering overseas. Since he also does some specialty repair work, he does have a room of tech gear required for that which he will keep until he is tired of dealing with customers. Also a shop full of metal- and wood-working tools that I don't see him letting go of any time soon. He did pass on his extensive set of car repair tools to our son, as our cars are newer and he isn't interested in having a hobby car (although I did see him eyeing an older Miata for sale in a parking lot).

I had a harder time letting go of some of my geology texts, but I am down to one bookshelf. But I also have a craft area with a lot of beads/stringing gemstones/metalworking supplies and yarn.

But, lol, if I go first, he knows all the beading/jewelry work stuff trundles across the street to the neighbor's house and the yarn goes around the block to another neighbor. I will have a harder time figuring out what do with his shop full of stuff, although I would probably either just have a shop sale or hire one of the estate places that specializes in tools to clear out the entire garage. The tech gear ... I dunno. If I have to figure it out at some point, it won't be the greatest of my worries.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
Moderator for: Oregon (and subforums), Auto Racing.
When you signed up for an account, you agreed to abide by the site's TOS and rules. You really should look through them.
City-Data Terms of Service: http://www.city-data.com/terms.html
City-Data FAQ: http://www.city-data.com/forum/faq/

Last edited by PNW-type-gal; Today at 02:32 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top