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Old 04-30-2008, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,689 posts, read 33,695,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Don't think small town RE will plummet as if you live in a small town near the town center (and if there's still a vibrant Main Street or neighborhood shopping) you can walk or bike to most everything you need. Not if you live way out in the rural areas, though.

We moved to a smaller community of about 7000 people and chose our new home's location carefully so we can walk or bike to everything we need within a mile. And we could live without a car completely if need be. This was before gas prices shot up so much. We just prefer to not be driving all the time and enjoy walking or bicycling.
I just meant that people in the workforce moving back to the cities would make pre-existing real estate in outlying areas cheaper because the only demand for it would be from people like us who don't have to commute every day, people that work at home and people who work in the town they live in. I was thinking maybe retirees would get better deals on housing in the suburbs and rural areas if gas prices remain high and when workers decide they need to move closer to their jobs.

I have lived in two other states where it was not unusual for people to spend over an hour on their commute. I'd have to think those people would seriously reconsider where they live if gas prices remain high. If I was 30 something Joe and Jane Smith with 2 little Smiths, I would not be shopping for a home 40 miles from my job, right now.

If I was a homeowner, still in the workforce, and I lived in some large multi-floored house in some outlying area, I'd be sweating because, except for a handful of people who work at home, no retiree/retiree couple is going to want that thing and they may be the only buyers left who will want to live some distance from a city.
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Old 04-30-2008, 09:31 AM
 
Location: occupied east coast
871 posts, read 1,951,823 times
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Please understand that I say the following with all respect.

If the price of Gasoline is effecting your plans for retirement, perhaps you should reexamin entering into that aspect of life.

I personally would be more concerned about the price of housing, HEAT, food, health care and other necessities, than worrying about Gasoline.
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Old 04-30-2008, 09:40 AM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,298 posts, read 15,353,559 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banger View Post
Please understand that I say the following with all respect.

If the price of Gasoline is effecting your plans for retirement, perhaps you should reexamin entering into that aspect of life.

I personally would be more concerned about the price of housing, HEAT, food, health care and other necessities, than worrying about Gasoline.
Since, the price of gasoline is one of the things that influences the price of just about everything you listed, it would be short-sighted NOT to consider it. Food and building materials have to be trucked in, it takes gasoline and petroleum by-products to farm and process food, gasoline and natural gas are used to produce heat in many places.
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Old 04-30-2008, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
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Yes, PNW, you're absolutely right, rising fuel costs will and do affect every element of our lives.

We were just talking about that with a group of friends--we're all enlarging our gardens and will be swapping produce back and forth and have found a local source for free-range eggs and know several local fishermen and we're all determined to live more simply with the rising prices...we swap books and clothes already...my husband and I got rid of one of our two cars since we mostly bike and walk everywhere, it was a financial drain that was unnecessary.

I don't feel at all deprived by doing these things--just the opposite--I feel our community pulling together--it's quite wonderful, really. Empowering to share.

Anyone else having these discussions, making these or other changes?
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Old 04-30-2008, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,972 posts, read 12,490,008 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banger View Post
Please understand that I say the following with all respect.

If the price of Gasoline is effecting your plans for retirement, perhaps you should reexamin entering into that aspect of life.

I personally would be more concerned about the price of housing, HEAT, food, health care and other necessities, than worrying about Gasoline.
I agree with that comment.
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Old 04-30-2008, 08:21 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
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The cost of areas that have or will have public transportation like light rail have just as many cost drawbacks from what I have seen and other problems. So no gas prices will not effect my choice.In fact many mero areas alos have the highest prices mainly driven by the cost of things like gas station cost of doing business.
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Old 05-02-2008, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,689 posts, read 33,695,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banger View Post
Please understand that I say the following with all respect.

If the price of Gasoline is effecting your plans for retirement, perhaps you should reexamin entering into that aspect of life.

I personally would be more concerned about the price of housing, HEAT, food, health care and other necessities, than worrying about Gasoline.
This wasn't meant to provoke discussion on whether you would retire but where you would most likely live (urban, suburban, rural areas) as a retiree in a longterm gas crunch.

In addition to the cost of gasoline, the future availability of it may also enter into the decision of where to live. Since we're all retirees or about to be retirees, we all remember lining up for gas on odd or even days, depending on our license plate number, during the Carter administration.

I'm thinking in addition to cost, the issue of future availability may also drive the working commuter to live closer to their city jobs.

But if there is a migration trend back to the cities for the working man/woman and their families, over a period of years, will their houses in far flung areas be bought by retirees who don't have to commute? I'd have to guess, the houses would go cheaper (less demand) but I might also guess, they would be too big for a retiree and as you mentioned, who would want to heat them, especially in the northern states where winters are longer.
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Old 05-02-2008, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Lovelock, NV - Anchorage, AK
1,195 posts, read 4,994,187 times
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My husband and I are retiring to 5 acres out on the road circuit but 25 miles from a small town and 75 miles from a larger one, needless to say we will be doing our shopping in bulk as well as buying our hobby supplies in bulk. Once back at the property we are hoping to only leave possibly once a week, not because of the gas prices but because we will have so much to do that we will need to hang around there to get it done. The cost of fuel will cause us to save more in our budget for our future plans but won't stop us from doing it. This has been a life long dream of ours and finally coming to point of seeing and living it.
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Old 05-02-2008, 12:45 PM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,052,621 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
But if there is a migration trend back to the cities for the working man/woman and their families, over a period of years, will their houses in far flung areas be bought by retirees who don't have to commute? I'd have to guess, the houses would go cheaper (less demand) but I might also guess, they would be too big for a retiree and as you mentioned, who would want to heat them, especially in the northern states where winters are longer.
If past is prologue.... The old, drafty Victorian mansions built for the large families of the time pretty much got carved up into multifamily dwellings along with remodeling to improve energy efficiency. So would a long-term energy crisis drive people to abandon their current cavernous dwellings to be carved up into multifamily dwellings and make them more energy efficient?

I would think that technologies that make telecommuting a real option would continue to expand. There are so many more people on this earth and in this country (USA) than before, the city centers cannot accommodate all of them. There really isn't any way to get around the need to move people around their local areas. Perhaps expansions of light rail, bringing back trolleys and such would address the need while reducing the energy costs.

Retirees will still need services and to able to get around. The sheer numbers of baby boomers means we can't all be shunted off to retirement community enclaves (out of sight-out of mind) and as we age, our needs to have services either at hand or to get to them will increase even as our day to day commuting decreases.

Expanding renewable and clean energy sources (like solar) seems like a more reasonable approach. As costs go down and technologies improve, the electrical needs could be gotten completely from solar in the future - every house has solar collectors as roofing - there is only a 10% loss to move electricity from one end of the country to the other. More and more energy needs could be converted to electricity if the generation is more ubiquitous and clean. It would be a huge change, but the technology exists now. It only takes a political will to make it happen.

Just some thoughts.
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Old 05-03-2008, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,689 posts, read 33,695,295 times
Reputation: 51900
There are 2 articles on websites about our Tennessee State Senator unveiling a national comprehensive energy plan on May 9 from my town in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. It's not the energy plan topic itself that caught my eye but a quote from a regular Joe at the end of the article. The guy said he lives in Rossville and commutes to work in Chattanooga, He thinks the government should do nothing, maybe even raise gasoline taxes. He said if gas cost $10 per gallon, you bet he'd move his family and he bets a lot of people would, too.
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