U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-27-2008, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,694 posts, read 33,709,656 times
Reputation: 51934

Advertisements

Will gasoline prices impact where you move to in retirement? I asked a similar question in the general US forums of people still in the workforce.

My guess is that people still in the workforce will move to the cities if gasoline prices remain high for a long time or forever because commuting will be just too expensive. How do you think it will impact retirees?

I'm thinking if a lot of working people start moving back to the cities, housing prices in rural areas and suburban areas will plummet. What do you think?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-27-2008, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,973 posts, read 12,496,612 times
Reputation: 8734
Im thinking that gas prices are not something that is going to be $2.00 again. There is serious problems in this country and the world with the oil situation. Im sorry to offend anyone in the USA but we are one of the main causes with our reliance and over dependence on it. I feel there will be some that will reaccess their situation as to where they live, and the distance from where they need to go in life more so now. I however feel many more will do nothing and it will stay that way until the situation is so out of control that one day gas will be rationed. I learned long ago to not depend on oil and live miles from where I had to be in life, and I will continue that when I find my area to retire to. I am not sure if housing prices will plummet in rural areas due to people moving to cities. I am however sure if people do not learn to conserve and stop our dependence on oil especially foreign oil, it will not just be rice that is rationed, it will be gas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-27-2008, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,832,670 times
Reputation: 18992
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Will gasoline prices impact where you move to in retirement? I asked a similar question in the general US forums of people still in the workforce.

My guess is that people still in the workforce will move to the cities if gasoline prices remain high for a long time or forever because commuting will be just too expensive. How do you think it will impact retirees?

I'm thinking if a lot of working people start moving back to the cities, housing prices in rural areas and suburban areas will plummet. What do you think?
Gas prices might affect housing prices in suburban areas... but it would have to turn into a severe, long term crisis. A year or two of high gas prices won't cause a huge migration, especially since it's difficult to sell houses right now. Most people will stay put. What I think is more likely is that companies will finally have enough incentive to allow employees to telecommute.

One thing I've seen happen during economic turmoil is crime can rise in the urban areas, causing businesses to give up on having a city office and move out to the suburbs. Many small businesses will move out near the town where the owner or the CEO live. As a person who used to own a small business (publishing company) I can tell you it's actually a smart idea to move a business to the 'burbs during a recession. Right now, a business owner can find a good deal on the rent.

The good news/bad news part of moving a business is that a fair number of employees will not make the move. For my company, this was mostly good news. We lost the less valuable employees, anyway... every business has a few of 'em. When times get tough, those are the same people you might have to let go (sad, but true). It's better for everyone this way.

And another thing about moving to the 'burbs during a recession: if you have to replace an employee and you are short on funds, you can get someone from the surrounding neighborhood for less $$$. There are plenty of college educated suburban housewives who are currently looking for a job to help out with the bills; they are more willing to accept a lower paying job if the office is just a mile from home.

Rural areas won't be affected one way or the other. Relatively few people live in a rural area and work in a city. The food & gas shortages actually mean more money for farmers (although this is balanced by the rising cost of transportation to get the food to market).

Last edited by normie; 04-27-2008 at 10:02 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2008, 10:45 AM
 
58 posts, read 179,874 times
Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Will gasoline prices impact where you move to in retirement? I asked a similar question in the general US forums of people still in the workforce.

I'm thinking if a lot of working people start moving back to the cities, housing prices in rural areas and suburban areas will plummet. What do you think?


I retired a few months ago, moved to another state where gasoline is actually 20 cents a gallon more than where I lived previously and a rural area. I don't drive nearly as much as I did when I was working where a trip here and there to a store was a hop skip and a jump. I need so much less now that I grocery shopping and do all my errands in one trip.

I don't feel gas prices will cause working people to move into cities. Usually housing costs including property taxes are higher in cities. Many companies are promoting telecommuting. I worked from home for the past three years three days a week.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2008, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Bayside, NY
823 posts, read 3,375,780 times
Reputation: 387
If the price of gas remains high either permanently or for a prolonged period of time it should force the car makers to make cars that are more economical in use of gas and also force the research into alternative fuel sources which in the long run will see people keeping to their plans as to where to live.

Don't forget it costs a lot more for housing in a city vs the suburban and rural areas.

The one change that the high gas prices has had on me is that I plan for my next car to be a Honda Civic instead of a larger car.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2008, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,372 posts, read 9,869,967 times
Reputation: 10243
Don't think small town RE will plummet as if you live in a small town near the town center (and if there's still a vibrant Main Street or neighborhood shopping) you can walk or bike to most everything you need. Not if you live way out in the rural areas, though.

We moved to a smaller community of about 7000 people and chose our new home's location carefully so we can walk or bike to everything we need within a mile. And we could live without a car completely if need be. This was before gas prices shot up so much. We just prefer to not be driving all the time and enjoy walking or bicycling.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2008, 04:34 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,236 posts, read 18,523,823 times
Reputation: 17765
Yes, a small town sounds wonderful with nearby public transportantion to larger cities (malls and all). I love to walk and hike , too.
__________________
******************


People may not recall what you said to them, but they will always remember how you made them feel .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2008, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,492 posts, read 51,406,502 times
Reputation: 24613
I could actually do this job from home but I doubt if they would go for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2008, 07:11 PM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,308 posts, read 15,363,150 times
Reputation: 9493
Only in so much as I planned out a move to an area which could be self-sufficient in event of insane gasoline prices - just one of the factors in picking a retirement location. We have a reasonable supply of water, there is (somewhat) a local agriculture scene (and, using the abundant geothermal resources, year-round hot houses are easily achieved), the town isn't dependent on tourism or truck traffic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2008, 08:32 PM
 
433 posts, read 992,434 times
Reputation: 389
Gas prices affect me only indirectly as I've been happily carfree for ten years. Living in San Francisco, going without a car hasn't been difficult. Although I quit my job several months ago, I've delayed moving because of uncertainty about whether I can get along without a car in any of the places where I'm thinking of going. I really don't want to buy another car. I'd rather run errands on foot and take a cab or public transit when I need to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top