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Old 05-27-2008, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Looking over your shoulder
30,348 posts, read 27,841,812 times
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PBS has an interesting documentary that provides some of the identical information that was found in the Sicko documentary. Frontline, “Sick Around the World” covers a good deal of the information about health care in other countries. You can read the interviews, discussions and even view parts of the documentary online or order the DVD disc.


FRONTLINE:sick around the world | PBS

From what I’m seeing and reading the US health care has some areas to improve in and they could learn a great deal from other countries. The bottom line is people who live there are happy with their care and services that the health care system is providing them. I don’t hear the same types of comments about our US health care and there are never any positive comments about our insurance companies. NEVER.
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Old 05-27-2008, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,721 posts, read 49,529,915 times
Reputation: 19162
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeeBee View Post
Our system offers the best care in the world - if you can afford it. If you have money for chemo treatments for your child, you will get the best of the best - and if you don't have the money, well, I guess you are out of luck. (Yes, I have a true story to back that up). (I'm talking about working people here).

I agree with most of what you said. Excellent medical care is available. But if you don't have the cash, there's a great likelihood you will not be treated long-term, or will receive limited, sub-par care. Maybe that's the same in every country in the world, I don't know.
Our nation also offers a level of health care which is less then 'the best'.

As a US servicemember, my family and I have been treated for many years, by our military's healthcare system.

18 to 20 year olds who learn medicine via OJT, and for the most part hand out a lot of motrin.

I have had broken bones, stitches, surgeries. My wife has had a baby. Our children have had various things.

Today as a retiree, we live far away from military bases, so I qualify for a civilian healthcare insurance policy. I pay into it, and we are treated by civilian doctors and nurses.

I can attest to the fact that civilian doctors in America are far better

These 'doctors' have been through college and medical school.
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Old 05-27-2008, 10:37 AM
 
4,800 posts, read 11,990,957 times
Reputation: 3453
Quote:
Originally Posted by AksarbeN View Post
PBS has an interesting documentary that provides some of the identical information that was found in the Sicko documentary. Frontline, “Sick Around the World” covers a good deal of the information about health care in other countries. You can read the interviews, discussions and even view parts of the documentary online or order the DVD disc.


FRONTLINE:sick around the world | PBS

From what I’m seeing and reading the US health care has some areas to improve in and they could learn a great deal from other countries. The bottom line is people who live there are happy with their care and services that the health care system is providing them. I don’t hear the same types of comments about our US health care and there are never any positive comments about our insurance companies. NEVER.
Well I will be the first then. I have always thought my health care and dental insurance worked well and also always have considered the care I have received as excellent.

I only wish they would have had high deductible plan Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) during my younger years.
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Old 05-27-2008, 10:52 AM
 
Location: northeast US
739 posts, read 1,885,342 times
Reputation: 446
Moving to another country just to try to get health care isn't a very good plan.

I'm a European dual citizen, with a euro passport. We can live anywhere in the European Union. The cost to move all our furnishings and belongings, or the personal cost to abandon everything, and lack of family and a job when we get there, make it an illusory option.

Not to mention that the US dollars you have are worth little these days in Europe and are now on a par with the Canadian dollar, down from @ 75 cents.
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Old 05-27-2008, 12:22 PM
 
4,628 posts, read 9,284,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimtheGuy View Post
Well I will be the first then. I have always thought my health care and dental insurance worked well and also always have considered the care I have received as excellent.

I only wish they would have had high deductible plan Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) during my younger years.
So may we assume that you have insurance coverage through work?

I am now retired, so this may be more of a concern to me than you, if that's the case. When I had a (very well-paying) job, our insurance was entirely covered...and yes, I too felt it was the best there was. Such a deal. I barely spent $300 per year out of pocket for health, dental and eyecare.

It's easy to become complacent when costs like that are covered by someone else. Many companies are no longer offering health insurance. To tell someone to just get a job where they pay your insurance is a bit out of step with the times.

Even where I worked, they started taking about $100 out of employees' pay to help cover the over whelming costs of insurance. Now, living on a retiree's pension, and barely being able to cover the cost for minimum coverage, I find that $100 kind of laughable.

Former co-workers who retired "very smartly" are paying much more than I. Costs are easily $1200+ for a couple, case in point. That is $1200+ per month, with the cost going up every year. Their deductible is over $3,500 per year. You will not find anything cheaper that offers full coverage.

Point being that something is wrong with our system. Get a major illness with health coverage and you'll be alright. Get a major illness with no health coverage, and you will not even be able to afford the medicine.

Not every person may be as fortunate as you or I.

I've been lucky health wise, and that I can even afford insurance. I appreciate my good fortune.
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Old 05-27-2008, 12:31 PM
 
4,628 posts, read 9,284,886 times
Reputation: 4238
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Our nation also offers a level of health care which is less then 'the best'.

As a US servicemember, my family and I have been treated for many years, by our military's healthcare system.

18 to 20 year olds who learn medicine via OJT, and for the most part hand out a lot of motrin.

I have had broken bones, stitches, surgeries. My wife has had a baby. Our children have had various things.

Today as a retiree, we live far away from military bases, so I qualify for a civilian healthcare insurance policy. I pay into it, and we are treated by civilian doctors and nurses.

I can attest to the fact that civilian doctors in America are far better

These 'doctors' have been through college and medical school.
Holy cow, I received more medical training than the person who delivered your babies! And we were taught how to do that! Surgeries? Now, that's scary!

forest beekeeper, it is a fine idea to stay as far away from a military hospital as possible! LOL - it is nice isn't it, to be able to see a doctor who's been through (and graduated!) med school, I highly recommend it
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Old 05-27-2008, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,721 posts, read 49,529,915 times
Reputation: 19162
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeeBee View Post
Holy cow, I received more medical training than the person who delivered your babies! And we were taught how to do that! Surgeries? Now, that's scary!

forest beekeeper, it is a fine idea to stay as far away from a military hospital as possible! LOL - it is nice isn't it, to be able to see a doctor who's been through (and graduated!) med school, I highly recommend it
LOL

I agree.

Our last duty station was Naples Italy, one afternoon our youngest son was doing a stunt on a skateboard and landed on his face. Drove his glasses into his forehead, and split open his bottom lip. Like a cleft pallet the bottom lip was in twain the left side from the right side. I sat with him all night at the US Navy hospital ER waiting for any of the corpsmen to stitch his lips back together. None of them felt qualified, in the morning a PA came in, but he was not about to do it on a dependant. The best that they could offer was going to be putting him on a bus mid-morning and driving him up to Germany. In theory one of the US military hospitals in Germany should have a med school trained doctor, who would not scar his face up to badly. I am an ET, but I had done a bit of stitching on subs, and I had observed corpsmen underwater attempting to perform more delicate stitching [mostly just holding the poor crewmen down]. So that morning, I finally went ahead and re-connected his two bottom lips. It healed fine and the scar is barely noticible.

I was amazed that a five story tall hospital with all the clinics, and nobody there was qualified to perform stitches on a child's face.

In 83 I was in Fresno California at a gun range on a Monday, when I got a piece of brass thrown into my right eye. It lodged in the clear pupil part, and was sticking out there. I was driven to the NAS Reedley where two entomologists were on staff. They both were able to grab the brass and pull on it, but they said that they could see my pupil beginning to separate from my eye. Neither of them had the [cahoonas?] to pull the brass out from my pupil. so they scheduled me for a bus to Oakland the following Wednesday. My Dw looked in the phone book and found a Opthamologist in Reedley. She called ahead, and we drove to his office. I walked right in, and he had an room empty for me. Right away he pulled the brass out, and he put some eye drops in. He said he did have the equipment needed in case he had pulled my pupil loose. Fortunately my pupil stayed in my eye. He charged me $35, I paid him in cash and I left. Wham bam, done.

If left to the US Navy, I might easily have lost my eye.

I do prefer being treated by docs who are college and med school grads.
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Old 05-27-2008, 02:32 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 84,056,192 times
Reputation: 18051
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeeBee View Post
So may we assume that you have insurance coverage through work?

I am now retired, so this may be more of a concern to me than you, if that's the case. When I had a (very well-paying) job, our insurance was entirely covered...and yes, I too felt it was the best there was. Such a deal. I barely spent $300 per year out of pocket for health, dental and eyecare.

It's easy to become complacent when costs like that are covered by someone else. Many companies are no longer offering health insurance. To tell someone to just get a job where they pay your insurance is a bit out of step with the times.

Even where I worked, they started taking about $100 out of employees' pay to help cover the over whelming costs of insurance. Now, living on a retiree's pension, and barely being able to cover the cost for minimum coverage, I find that $100 kind of laughable.

Former co-workers who retired "very smartly" are paying much more than I. Costs are easily $1200+ for a couple, case in point. That is $1200+ per month, with the cost going up every year. Their deductible is over $3,500 per year. You will not find anything cheaper that offers full coverage.

Point being that something is wrong with our system. Get a major illness with health coverage and you'll be alright. Get a major illness with no health coverage, and you will not even be able to afford the medicine.

Not every person may be as fortunate as you or I.

I've been lucky health wise, and that I can even afford insurance. I appreciate my good fortune.

If this is the case when you worked ;welcome to the real world.If you were getting full coverage free and had a well paying job;I have to wander why you are not better prepared.Even a $100 a month has been peanuts for along time. That wouldn't cover a plumbers cost much less medical.Surely you saved enough to cover your medical until medicare kicks in at least.
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Old 05-27-2008, 04:15 PM
 
4,628 posts, read 9,284,886 times
Reputation: 4238
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
If this is the case when you worked ;welcome to the real world.If you were getting full coverage free and had a well paying job;I have to wander why you are not better prepared.Even a $100 a month has been peanuts for along time. That wouldn't cover a plumbers cost much less medical.Surely you saved enough to cover your medical until medicare kicks in at least.
As someone coined, quit calling me Shirley!!!

I've known what the "real world" is like my whole life. ENCORE! People - that'd be me, you and everyone else - do tend to get complacent about particulars when we think we don't need to be concerned with an issue. You've entirely missed the point about the $100 - and, in doing so, agreed with me anyway! I'm sure you caught that, though.

Please read my entire post before citing statements that cause you to "wander". That could get very dangerous. However, I certainly am not going to discuss the truly pertinent facts of my life or finances on an anonymous website, to satisfy your's or anyone else's "wanderment."

What you get on this website, are bits and pieces of people's lives. Try not to judge too harshly there, because you will never have all of the facts.

This whole thread is about the trouble of maintaining affordable coverage in the United States. We are sharing our personal experiences, and hopefully can stay on course here, without personal comments.

Last edited by Wicked Felina; 05-27-2008 at 04:27 PM.. Reason: words
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Old 05-27-2008, 04:26 PM
 
4,628 posts, read 9,284,886 times
Reputation: 4238
Default Yikes!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
They both were able to grab the brass and pull on it, but they said that they could see my pupil beginning to separate from my eye. Neither of them had the [cahoonas?] to pull the brass out from my pupil. so they scheduled me for a bus to Oakland the following Wednesday. My Dw looked in the phone book and found a Opthamologist in Reedley. She called ahead, and we drove to his office. I walked right in, and he had an room empty for me. Right away he pulled the brass out, and he put some eye drops in. He said he did have the equipment needed in case he had pulled my pupil loose. Fortunately my pupil stayed in my eye. He charged me $35, I paid him in cash and I left. Wham bam, done.

If left to the US Navy, I might easily have lost my eye.

I do prefer being treated by docs who are college and med school grads.
May we now refer to you as Dr. Forest, or Dr. Beekeeper??? Both seem fitting. I think you got the right word up there, alright. Oh, but the Navy has such good-looking uniforms...this is all so disappointing to a civiian like myself.

When we'd go to the range, the rangemasters would run and get us band-aids if we got a blister. Sometimes, being a woman is good for things like that!!!

Yikes, you need to write a book! That's all pretty cool stuff, or rather interesting stuff, and since I have a Photobucket account now, this is for you:
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