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Thread summary:

Stimulation in retirement, financial support children, life insurance, pensions, going back to school, hobbies and outdoor activities, early retirement, non-profit organization volunteer work

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Old 05-27-2008, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,176 posts, read 8,698,297 times
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Thank you for all your posts! I learn more from you on CD than from anyone else.

I think my parents drummed it into their children - you must be productive. I know I tend to feel guilty if I'm not doing something productive. It's interesting to hear about all the pursuits your friends have, janb.

Being on this website has enlightened me, showing me another side. My mom has friends who are retired but they were women who never worked, lived the country club life and are quite happy.

I did grow up that way, thought that was in my future, didn't work out that way, still trying to get there someday. I would love to live in an area where there were lots of social opportunities!!
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Old 05-27-2008, 04:39 PM
 
2,317 posts, read 4,639,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
Thank you for all your posts! I learn more from you on CD than from anyone else.

I think my parents drummed it into their children - you must be productive. I know I tend to feel guilty if I'm not doing something productive. It's interesting to hear about all the pursuits your friends have, janb.

Being on this website has enlightened me, showing me another side. My mom has friends who are retired but they were women who never worked, lived the country club life and are quite happy.

I did grow up that way, thought that was in my future, didn't work out that way, still trying to get there someday. I would love to live in an area where there were lots of social opportunities!!
Yes,I know what you mean...alot of the old timers worked until they dropped,
or felt I have to keep working they knew no other way.I am retired
and still feel productive because I have paid my dues,I have worked since
16,from high school through college,not a break in working until I retired
nov.2007.I am happy and enjoying my life,I do not miss work at all!You
will have a different mindset when you plan to retire,I couldn't wait.I
was lucky to retire at 49,in great health,with a pension,medical,a home in NY
and PA,because of #1 planning.#2 good attitude,your attitude will dictate
your success and happiness
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Old 05-28-2008, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,691 posts, read 33,700,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
City Data has helped me think about retirement. My husband and I do not have good role models in this area. His parents were/are very quiet, not do much type people even when they were younger; my parents have had to have financial support from their children.

I just went to college to finish. Yes, my husband and I are in our late 40's, early 50's but I am being stimulated probably for the first time in 15 years. That got me to thinking - when you are retired, how do you get stimulated? Do you feel left out? Like the world is going on without you?

It's hard for me to explain but retirement is something I never thought about.
Feeling left out is not something I feel is related to retirement but something related to age. Do you know how many opinion pollers don't care what you think if you are over 49? It wouldn't matter if you were still in the workforce.

Tests have shown that the older you are, the less likely you will be to change brands. So, advertisers think you won't try their new products because you will be brand loyal to the old ones. It influences what you see on TV. Ever wonder why you don't see a lot of 55 and over people in TV dramas? It's because advertisers put the squeeze on networks to make the shows appeal to younger audiences and the networks in turn, put the squeeze on producers. The younger the audience, the more the networks can charge for advertising. The producers are rewarded with bigger budgets, if the show attracts a younger audience. Dramas are more expensive than sitcoms to make, so they'll put an older person on as a regular on the sitcoms (usually the brunt of the jokes) but they are rarely regulars in dramas. The reason it goes as high as 49 years old is because 49 year olds may have children still at home that influence the parents' buying habits. Next time you see TV ratings, check out the important demo - It's 18 - 49.

I had a friend who went to the movies and was stopped by survey takers after the show. As soon as they found out how old she was, they ended the survey. Last I checked, a 52 year old pays as much for a movie as a 25 year old but "product placement" makes the 25 year old's opinion of the movie, more important.

As far as stimulation goes, I still take classes as a retiree. I'm lucky to have a good inexpensive retiree program in my town. I'm between semesters right now (it mirrors actual college sessions and summer seeion doesn't start until June) and I miss my classes. Having a good hobby helps, too, and I've always liked to read and do things on my computer.

You know, some people in the workforce need a three ringed circus to be stimulated on vacation. I'm guessing those same people might have a harder time in retirement finding stimulation but I could be wrong.
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Old 05-28-2008, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,176 posts, read 8,698,297 times
Reputation: 6199
Smile You have made good points....

I've always had to take care of someone financially and still do. Because of that situation, I haven't had the chance to develop real hobbies, per se. I mean, I do volunteer at church (teach Sunday School for the 4 and 5 year olds on Sundays), sit on committees in my neighborhoods, belong to Book Clubs, am in Junior League so I try. I was also involved in my children's schools but they are now in college or on their own.

I'm such a late bloomer on this stuff! I have enjoyed going back to school; so much has changed in 15 years and I find the new ways stimulating and fun. I am a multi tasker, can have a phone in my ear, work on the computer and be doing something else so I'm OK with that.

I do love to play games; I wish I knew how to play bridge (no one has ever shown me). I can play Texas Hold Em and some of the card games teens play. I actually love cards. My daughter does too.

Laura, where you live sounds so nice. My husband's mom was from Johnson City, TN; his aunt lives in Knoxville so we probably need to visit there and see it.

All of you have been great on this topic. I have no one to really talk to about it except on here so you all are my inspiration and guides!!

Thanks!
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Old 05-29-2008, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Las Cruces and loving it!
576 posts, read 2,062,892 times
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Bette, you mentioned feeling guilty if not being productive. I was surprised at how guilty I felt at first after retiring a year ago at 62. It didn't feel as though I had worked long enough to "deserve" retirement, but then I got over that by remembering how I started babysitting and ironing (remember ironing, anyone?) for young housewives when I was 13 and have continued to work hard all my life.

Going back to school in my fifties to finish a long-deferred bachelor's degree showed me that I was still academically fit, so I continued on and got my master's at age 58. All the writing that was involved, and all the positive feedback I received convinced me that the writing I love is something I need to do every day. I started writing a blog, The Zees Go West, about moving from New Hampshire to live in New Mexico. It has encouraged me to travel, research, and improve on my photography, plus I've met several people across the country who have become readers of the blog.

I've just started putting my photos together into a series "videos" on YouTube about Clovis and New Mexico. I post them under the name of clovisclair.

Because I was adjusting to both retirement and living in a new place far from all that was familiar, it took me a while to work out how to meet people in my new town. The best path for me was through volunteer work--I am a literacy tutor at the local community college, and I work a morning a week with 1st and 2nd graders at an elementary school in the HOSTS (broken link) program, mentoring struggling young readers.

It was hard for me to go to the Senior Center the first time (because that meant I really was a senior!) but I'm sure glad I did. I knit and tell stories and laugh with a wonderful group of women, making baby blankets for local low income families. The center provides a wide variety of activities and I plan to check out their musical evenings and their trips around the state soon.

I have also been making sweaters for needy children around the country and around the world through Knit for Kids. I am on my 43rd sweater, going for at least 100! It gives me a great feeling of accomplishment.

For physical activity, while pretty limited right now due to arthritis, I swim several times a week and am meeting lots of people at the community pool. To keep my brain nimble, I do sudoku and crossword puzzles--I swear that working puzzles has helped improve my memory.

It goes without saying that I love City-Data! I'm usually providing answers and posting photos over at the New Mexico forum.

Every day is a wonderful gift and I treasure this time I've been given (oops, that I've earned). It is so lovely to live without stress, and to be able to choose my own activities (instead of being assigned yet another staff meeting), and to be able to read all the books I want at last.

I hope that this post has helped someone else visualize their retirement. I'm not out climbing mountains (darned knees) but I'm having a fantastic time!

~clairz
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Old 05-29-2008, 07:16 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,053,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clairz View Post
To keep my brain nimble, I do sudoku and crossword puzzles--I swear that working puzzles has helped improve my memory.
Tests show that this is true.

Sounds like you have found many ways to enjoy life even with some physical limitations. I hope to be able to adapt as well when my time comes. I know that a time will come when arthritis will limit me too.
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Old 05-30-2008, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,691 posts, read 33,700,331 times
Reputation: 51915
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
I mean, I do volunteer at church (teach Sunday School for the 4 and 5 year olds on Sundays), sit on committees in my neighborhoods, belong to Book Clubs, am in Junior League so I try.

I do love to play games; I wish I knew how to play bridge (no one has ever shown me). I can play Texas Hold Em and some of the card games teens play. I actually love cards. My daughter does too.

Laura, where you live sounds so nice. My husband's mom was from Johnson City, TN; his aunt lives in Knoxville so we probably need to visit there and see it.
You can still volunteer at church, sit on committees and belong to book clubs in retirement. My book discussion group meets once a month and goes out to lunch after the meeting. Also, my school has offered Bridge classes. If you want to see a sample course catalogue, take a look at mine for the Summer 2008 semester. The bridge classes for the summer semester are under Miscellaneous:

index

Also, here is a list of links to Institutes for Lifelong Learning in Retirement in various US States and Canada. I'm not sure how current it is but I checked it before I retired to see what kinds of programs were out there before I relocated:

Academy of Senior Professionals at Eckerd College (http://www.eckerd.edu/aspec/ein/ilr_usa.html - broken link):

Don't be thrown by the title of the link.
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Old 05-30-2008, 08:27 AM
 
2,317 posts, read 4,639,959 times
Reputation: 1248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
I've always had to take care of someone financially and still do. Because of that situation, I haven't had the chance to develop real hobbies, per se. I mean, I do volunteer at church (teach Sunday School for the 4 and 5 year olds on Sundays), sit on committees in my neighborhoods, belong to Book Clubs, am in Junior League so I try. I was also involved in my children's schools but they are now in college or on their own.

I'm such a late bloomer on this stuff! I have enjoyed going back to school; so much has changed in 15 years and I find the new ways stimulating and fun. I am a multi tasker, can have a phone in my ear, work on the computer and be doing something else so I'm OK with that.

I do love to play games; I wish I knew how to play bridge (no one has ever shown me). I can play Texas Hold Em and some of the card games teens play. I actually love cards. My daughter does too.

Laura, where you live sounds so nice. My husband's mom was from Johnson City, TN; his aunt lives in Knoxville so we probably need to visit there and see it.

All of you have been great on this topic. I have no one to really talk to about it except on here so you all are my inspiration and guides!!

Thanks!
feel free to ask as many and much info,I like to share my knowledge and
experience with people so they can have an easier time when the time comes.
also when you retire volunteer work is good,rotary,etc.
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Old 05-30-2008, 11:10 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,955,483 times
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Frankly has I got into my latter 50's I found that my taste in what I liked to do change alot. I was very active in fishing and hunting. But the thrill seemed to be less as the work to do these things got harder.I tend to do thngs I never would have thought I would enjoy like just plain traveling and more or less hangin out in places.I also enjoy things that I thought were a burden like keeping my yard and flower beds up because I now have time and it doesn't mean I have less time for toher things.Actually never feel left out as I find that I have alot more time for my friends and they seem to know that there is no scheduling problem if they invite you. Many are retired or semi-retired and we have alot more time to do things when everybody else is busy working.It is more the feeling that you are not taking up preiopus time doing shoping and chores away from what you really would be like doing that makes life more of a pleasure.Altho I do know people who's whole life was built around their work that have a hard time but that is like people who have the empty nest sydrome really.
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Old 05-30-2008, 02:12 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,608 posts, read 39,974,527 times
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Originally Posted by texdav View Post
Frankly has I got into my latter 50's I found that my taste in what I liked to do change alot. ...

Isn't that the truth ! Change is very interesting as we equip ourselves for the future. I'm glad I like taking classes and exploring new opportunities + I ask a lot of questions of anyone I come in contact with.

But I am really surprised at the degree of change in my areas of interests, yet I'm glad 'retirement' avails opportunity to try so many options. I will have to grow-up and decide what I want to be !

Seems I have PCADD (post career attention deficit disorder..)

At the moment I must buckle down and formulate a plan to 'de-junk', but preserve some the the stuff it took years to accumulate, and supported some of my 'previous' interests / profitable projects. This is an interesting challenge.

This would be one benefit of "co-housing" (seniors in community) --- equip the common areas of crafts, shop, farming / garden, cooking, brewing, ... and everyone could share the benefit and not have to keep all this junk ! What do I do with enough stuff to outfit a youth camp and community center (from quilting to canning, backpacking to photography + tractors and a machine shop) ?. seems a bit of a waste to sell or donate, since some came from Grandparent's farms and businesses + much of it is not available today. I guess that is why I like to visit Pioneer Village in Minden, NE... Harold Warp put his on display, but I would rather see mine used for more than Chinese scrap iron.

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 05-30-2008 at 02:29 PM..
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