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Thread summary:

Stimulation in retirement, financial support children, life insurance, pensions, going back to school, hobbies and outdoor activities, early retirement, non-profit organization volunteer work

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Old 05-26-2008, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,165 posts, read 8,689,130 times
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City Data has helped me think about retirement. My husband and I do not have good role models in this area. His parents were/are very quiet, not do much type people even when they were younger; my parents have had to have financial support from their children.

I just went to college to finish. Yes, my husband and I are in our late 40's, early 50's but I am being stimulated probably for the first time in 15 years. That got me to thinking - when you are retired, how do you get stimulated? Do you feel left out? Like the world is going on without you?

It's hard for me to explain but retirement is something I never thought about.
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Old 05-26-2008, 09:23 PM
 
2,317 posts, read 4,638,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
City Data has helped me think about retirement. My husband and I do not have good role models in this area. His parents were/are very quiet, not do much type people even when they were younger; my parents have had to have financial support from their children.

I just went to college to finish. Yes, my husband and I are in our late 40's, early 50's but I am being stimulated probably for the first time in 15 years. That got me to thinking - when you are retired, how do you get stimulated? Do you feel left out? Like the world is going on without you?

It's hard for me to explain but retirement is something I never thought about.
I just retired at 49 after 20 years of NYC law enforcement.The way I feel
about It Is you finally get the chance to really enjoy and savor life,no
more rushing getting stressed out,How do you get stimulated is you must
have a plan,what are your assets,debts,do you have medical insurance,
life insurance,pension or other income like 401,once you figure out what you
will live off when you retire,where would you want to live affordably,I had
been planning my retirement for years,It was a goal to look forward to.
I also have many hobbies and always busy doing what I want most of all
the main thing when you retire you should just be enjoying life,not rushing
I do not feel left out because I feel my time has come to retire and this
is the next chapther of my life.
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Old 05-26-2008, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,479 posts, read 7,033,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
I just went to college to finish. Yes, my husband and I are in our late 40's, early 50's but I am being stimulated probably for the first time in 15 years. That got me to thinking - when you are retired, how do you get stimulated? Do you feel left out? Like the world is going on without you?
I retired in August of last year; a planned early retirement (at 58.) I carefully planned the next phase of my life by saving and taking care of the financial stuff. I took my time looking at what I was interested in (dogs, art, metalworking, woodworking) and what I was good at (self-motivated, good organizational and management skills, like to learn for learning's sake.) I tried on several "jobs" in the years leading up to retirement--literacy tutor, editor, library volunteer, dog rescue volunteer--and identified what gave me the most satisfaction. When I retired, I already had something to do.

I now am on the board of a non-profit animal rescue group. I like metalwork, so I've taken several classes in silversmithing, jewelry making and enameling and am selling my work on a limited basis--for now.

I'm so busy and so happy, and I am grateful every day for the opportunity to spend my time doing things that are important to me. I don't miss my corporate management job at all. Never think about it. I stay in touch with some people I worked with, but our relationship wasn't based on work, so it's easy to maintain the friendships.

The best advice I can give you? Start thinking and planning now so when the time comes, you can transition right into the next part of your life.
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Old 05-26-2008, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,784 posts, read 23,803,102 times
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Tough question to answer Bette, but Coartist88 put forward a good approach to ensure that you won't feel left out.

My retirement last year, at 54, wasn't typical because I have external issues driving my decision. Within the context of my issues, I have had to try and get established in a new area far from where I have ever lived. I have found that if you have a direction you want to head in it is easier to fill in "voids". I do a bit of volunteer work to stay involved, and found that in just doing this it leads me to meet other folks who allow me to expand my network of friends and interests.
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Old 05-27-2008, 12:07 AM
 
13,314 posts, read 25,550,246 times
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If the OP found college so stimulating, go to more college! You can audit classes, after all, you don't need to pay for credits. In my area, Harvard has an "extension" school in the evenings. People can take classes for credits (much cheaper than the main university) or pay a minimal fee to audit.
Any college area or real city has lectures, book readings and other intellectual stimulation.
I personally can't wait to work part-time or retire fully because I certainly don't find employment "stimulating." Except, I notice, I am posting on company time (third shift).
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Old 05-27-2008, 12:15 AM
 
Location: southern california
55,647 posts, read 74,595,623 times
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get a hobby or 2 it will make the transition much easier. puzzled. read your profile mortgage broker most people in high stress jobs already got a hobby. how do you deal with stress and negative stuff? hobbies are a common way. later they become a nice way to pass time and enjoy retirement.
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Old 05-27-2008, 01:32 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,545 posts, read 39,924,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
...- when you are retired, how do you get stimulated? Do you feel left out? Like the world is going on without you?
.
Gosh I have a hard time keeping up with my 'retired' friends who are 30 - 40 yrs older than I (and I'm retired!). I feel they are leaving me in the dust with their hobbies and skills. One of my best friends just turned 90 and has always been a go getter, Really a superb photographer now has 3 plasma screens to show his awesome pics + just got a new Mac he is learning, and switching from MS. He does frequent presentations to hiking and camera clubs and helped another friend build an airplane last year. (It is nice to have the free time...). He climbed all 52 peaks in Colorado AFTER he retired. (again !!... he had done most of them before). Another friend is a great woodworker, and took up bowl turning after he was 70. We cut trees on his 70 acre place to get just the right wood for his projects. He's the perfect neighbor since he has a bulldozer and backhoe Both he and his wife enter several exhibits at the fair and have a whole bedroom plastered in Blue Ribbons. Other elderly friends are into horses, and cows, some into 'ATV's' Some like to travel, and have some great world adventures, my Step-dad went solo to Africa after he was 70, and spent a month hitchhiking... One couple in their 70's spend 3 months snow skiing at different destinations every year, and do at least 2 international mission trips per year to build orphanages. Just had breakfast with a couple who had very little time to catch up after being gone 2 yrs following around Habitat for Humanity projects. They were off to Canada on another project.

These are all my OLD friends... My young ones (under 70) are still busy building their retirement houses cabins and traveling and living internationally. Several of us have built homes for our kids. Then there are the car collectors and model airplane builders... a whole other story. Restoring collector cars can be a really good way to spend (a-lot of) your time. Nice ones are selling for over $100k

I spend too much of my time on CD But I need to get busy on my 'alternative-energy' projects. I plan to live off-grid by choice, if not necessity.

Too many projects, too little time. And that doesn't include the FUN stuff. Retired folks often are having a BLAST.
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Old 05-27-2008, 03:25 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,172 posts, read 6,885,571 times
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I've really enjoyed taking classes. University of Tennessee has some excellent non-credit courses. I've studied interior design, forensic anthropology, pottery wheel. I've learned stained glass and really enjoying that.
I thinking about going back for my masters. If you're disabled or age 65 and over, you can take courses for $7 a credit hour, with a maximum charge of $70 a semester. Course hours over that are free. It applies to undergrad as well as graduate courses. You can audit for free. It's an incredible opportunity.
There are always things going on in Knoxville. That's one of the reasons I moved here. You can find stimulation when you want it and peace when you don't.
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Old 05-27-2008, 04:07 AM
 
3,750 posts, read 9,600,559 times
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My dad bought his hobby farm when he retired over 20 some years ago and has remodeled the house, planted a chestnut orchard and a big garden, keeps up on politics and such. He calls the property his lean green exercise machine.

Now my mom never liked it because it was too far out of town. She really did need more social interactions but when you have been married that long (60 years next year) she made the decision to live with it.

Too bad there was not a better compromise.
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Old 05-27-2008, 08:20 AM
 
2,317 posts, read 4,638,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
get a hobby or 2 it will make the transition much easier. puzzled. read your profile mortgage broker most people in high stress jobs already got a hobby. how do you deal with stress and negative stuff? hobbies are a common way. later they become a nice way to pass time and enjoy retirement.
This is an excellent point...hobbies and interests.(you can also do a little
volunteer work) what i do is...run,work out(very important to stay in shape
and watch your health at this point)...I also golf,fish,go on wine tasting tours
read,make my own wine,draw,go to ballgames,movies,jazz concerts,go online
do my own home improvements,go to the local race track and casino's
hiking and going to the state parks and lakes...there is plenty to do when
you retire,and most of all just enjoy your life
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