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Old 05-13-2010, 05:37 PM
 
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Live Content, I always appreciate your thoughtful posts on any forum. You are obviously a wise and compassionate (and realistic) person.
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Old 05-14-2010, 12:52 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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This has been an interesting thread; it shows the truth that we are all different, and that our bodies react differently to a given disease or problem. Some therapies, including drugs, work well for some but not others. Many posters here, but not all, find that a dry climate helps their arthritis. A few have mentioned that exercise helps, and that's what I want to touch on.

I think there is a vicious circle with arthritis pain and movement. When some mild pain starts, we stop moving in ways which create the pain, which is a normal reaction. But then that lack of movement, over time, makes the arthritis worse, and so we move even less. Both my reading and my personal experience lead me to believe that arthritis can be helped by regular exercise, both aerobic and strength training. However, it's a tricky thing. We have to push into the pain somewhat, but not too much, and we have to keep at it. I had to keep jogging two or three times a week, for short distances, to make my right knee pain-free. I always stopped before the pain got severe. When I stop jogging for several weeks, I have to repeat the process and the knee again becomes pain free. (Walking never bothered it, even for quite long distances). Over-doing and fanaticism are not the ticket, and the aid of a physical therapist or experienced trainer might be helpful. I really think exercise is worth a try, but a week or two may not be enough to make much of a change so you have to commit to it.
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Old 05-15-2010, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Arizona
2,540 posts, read 469,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I have very severe arthritis. I grew up in New York State, near Buffalo. In my youth, I did not have problems but as I got older, arthritis appeared. I was fortunate that I moved to Denver, over 30 years ago before I had these issues. Denver is good because of the very low humidity and sits on a high semi-arid plain. It has very low humidity and much less snow than the Northeast. The big help for me is the frequent sunny days. I cannot tolerate rain, humidity, or cold and wet. Cold and dry is tolerable.

I have visited drier areas in the Southwest but I have found that cities that are too hot; as in Phoenix or Palm Springs, CA; cause me much discomfort as I have problems with too much cold air conditioning. I have found that warmer desert environments that are in high elevated arid deserts, like Las Cruces, New Mexico are ideal because they are not so hot and cool off substantial at night.

I would suggest you explore the Southwest. There are many cities in New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and Colorado that would be good places to live. In addition, I would look at Nevada and areas in Central Desert Valleys of California. I think there would be some cities in Western Texas that can be considered such as San Angelo or El Paso.

Livecontent



Agree with most of this post. Have lived in Ohio, Oregon, California, Arizona and Texas.
Most joint relief was in the Arizona central valley, but you must be able to stand the heat. Less pain there than anywhere I have lived.

After years in Arizona and a recent move to Texas, the joint pain is back once again.
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Old 05-18-2010, 10:11 PM
 
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I have AS and live in Alaska. Pain is acceptable here. Winter must be dealt with and eventually I will be spending the bulk of winter in a warmer climate.
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Old 05-27-2010, 04:47 AM
 
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I have RA and wasn't able to walk for months, I made a decision years ago to not let it stop me from living ,if the pain gets too bad I just eat a pain pill and continue on .
today I ride my bicycle 3-10 miles a day and do sit ups 100 -150 a day, to stop and quit is the worst thing to do your muscles and joints quit working, I feel we have to use them or lose them.........but I may be wrong..................
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Old 05-27-2010, 10:08 AM
 
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I've read on several posts to avoid areas where air conditioning is a necessity. I wish I could meet the person who started that myth---that ac aggravates arthritis.

I've had a severe case of RA for years. I prefer the same ambient temperature as most anyone. when its hot, I appreciate cool air. I've been so many places where people automatically decide I "can't take the air conditioning" and either turn it way down or shut it off. I've sweltered like a pig in places, because the AC would "affect me". I refuse to visit one relative, the last visit I nearly passed out, it was 100+ degrees outside, they turned off the AC because it would "affect me" I was just about dying of heat, found relief sitting in the path of a small floor fan, when they realized that, they immediately shut it off and started wrapping blankets around me.

For pity sake, people with RA aren't that fragile! If they were so concerned about my comfort, why don't they take my word for what bothers me, rather than go overboard on some myth? I flat out refuse to visit that particular relative, she made me so miserable I vowed never to return. I even discussed it with her, that contrary to what she might have been lead to believe, RA is not "affected" by air conditioning, I prefer a comfortable ambient temperature. I even offered to pay to run the ac while there, but they insisted on taking a paternalistic attitude (I'm 54), and keep saying I can't take a draft, chill, ac, etc. The only place I will interract with them is neurtal ground, like a restaurant, then they will complain to the manager to turn off the ac because it "affects me" I've completely given up on any relationship with these people, I can't suffer until I pass out going along with their little game.

Please, don't get the idea that AC somehow aggravates arthritis. People with arthritis aren't some strange being from another planet. We appreciate the same creature comforts anyone does, at least let us tell you what "affects" us, rather than go with your own ideas and make me suffer through them!
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Old 05-28-2010, 05:18 AM
 
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it isn't the temp. its the barometric pressure that causes the cool air,I can definitely tell you when its going to rain.
my pet peeve is watching the obese people who have handicapped parking stickers that park and waddle to the motorized shopping carts. why dont they cut back on the old carbs,and walk a little?
in other words loose some weight!!!!
my Dr. offered me a sticker for my car but after not being able to walk at one time I'm happy to be able to walk a few extra feet!
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Old 05-28-2010, 12:40 PM
 
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I disagree strongly with the poster who promulgates that AC is not painful for all Arthritis sufferers.There is many different types of arthritic pain and conditions, what is painful for some, may not be painful for others. So a blanket statement is not true.

For me, AC causes me more problems, especially at the extreme level that some shops and homes seem to think is necessary--well that is their choice. I have severe arthritis--all the different types together. I can tolerate moderate AC but when it gets really chilly--I feel it goes to my bones. Today, I have noticed that severe AC in stores are much less; I assume as a means of saving energy.

I am sitting in my house near Denver. It is 11:30 am. The temperature outside on my thermometer, in the shade is 95. My house temperature is 69. I have no AC, no swamp cooler and I have not yet taken my fans out of storage. What I do have is a ranch with a full basement, white roof and light painted house, extra thick insulation over R-53 in the attic. I have new energy efficient windows with a solar gain of .21 and U-Factor of .30. I have light colored sun block shades which I lower on the sun side and raise them and open windows on the shady side of the house. I just finished cooking lunch but I have an outside hood vent to discharge the heat to the roof. My basement is now at 62 degrees and very dry.

I cannot speak for all sufferers, only myself. All I know is what works for me. Living in this climate is great for arthritis. Denver is very dry with low humidity and that helps mitigate the pain that I suffer. Denver tends to get cloudy in some afternoon in the summer with occasional rain which cools off many of the hot days. However, whatever the heat, it will cool down substantial at night; it will be about 59 at tonight after a day of the 90s. Because of my house is heavily insulated and a ranch with a full basement, the house will stay about at about 68. At that time I open my windows, cool the house further and with the low humidity, it is very comfortable to sleep.

What I trying to say is that choosing the right place to live helps arthritic sufferers but in addition, the house you buy and how you cool and stay warm can be beneficial and can save money, if you do it right.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 05-28-2010 at 12:51 PM..
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Old 05-28-2010, 01:38 PM
 
5,445 posts, read 6,487,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I disagree strongly with the poster who promulgates that AC is not painful for all Arthritis sufferers.There is many different types of arthritic pain and conditions, what is painful for some, may not be painful for others. So a blanket statement is not true.

For me, AC causes me more problems, especially at the extreme level that some shops and homes seem to think is necessary--well that is their choice. I have severe arthritis--all the different types together. I can tolerate moderate AC but when it gets really chilly--I feel it goes to my bones. Today, I have noticed that severe AC in stores are much less; I assume as a means of saving energy.

I am sitting in my house near Denver. It is 11:30 am. The temperature outside on my thermometer, in the shade is 95. My house temperature is 69. I have no AC, no swamp cooler and I have not yet taken my fans out of storage. What I do have is a ranch with a full basement, white roof and light painted house, extra thick insulation over R-53 in the attic. I have new energy efficient windows with a solar gain of .21 and U-Factor of .30. I have light colored sun block shades which I lower on the sun side and raise them and open windows on the shady side of the house. I just finished cooking lunch but I have an outside hood vent to discharge the heat to the roof. My basement is now at 62 degrees and very dry.

I cannot speak for all sufferers, only myself. All I know is what works for me. Living in this climate is great for arthritis. Denver is very dry with low humidity and that helps mitigate the pain that I suffer. Denver tends to get cloudy in some afternoon in the summer with occasional rain which cools off many of the hot days. However, whatever the heat, it will cool down substantial at night; it will be about 59 at tonight after a day of the 90s. Because of my house is heavily insulated and a ranch with a full basement, the house will stay about at about 68. At that time I open my windows, cool the house further and with the low humidity, it is very comfortable to sleep.

What I trying to say is that choosing the right place to live helps arthritic sufferers but in addition, the house you buy and how you cool and stay warm can be beneficial and can save money, if you do it right.

Livecontent

Of course, people react differently to temperature, AC, etc, I really didn't intend to make a "blanket statement", I just wish people would stop assuming ath Ac is somehow the "kiss of death" for arthritis sufferers. What is comfortable for most is also comfortable for me, I just wish people would stop second-guessing my comfort level and insisting I follow their ideas.

If I come across as somewhat heated (no pun intended) its because its coming summer, and with it the obligatory family visits. Although I do enjoy visiting relatives, and feel its important for the children to have a sense of connection, etc, I've just about died in relatives homes, during the hot Texas summers, and they shut off the Ac and proceed to try to wrap me in blankets. Get real! I intend this summer to draft a polite, but firm letter to all, we are looking forward to our visit, I appreciate that you make every effort for my comfort while I am here, please realize that although general thinking is that Ac worsens arthritis, it doesn't affect me at moderate temperatures. On the other hand, I take medications that interfere with my body's reaction to heat. Extreme heat (such as inside a house with the AC shut off while its 100+ outside), causes me to overheat, sweat, and be decidely uncomfortable.

hey, they didn't need to be told, when they could see the sweat rolling off me in buckets, I was literally dripping from my arms onto the table, face flushed, it was quite obvious. This time I intend to stay in a nearby hotel, and take the family out to dinner. That way I have more control.

All I'm saying is that AC at normal levels does not affect RA. But I know what you mean, if at extremes, it does aggravate. But just keeping it about 78 is not unreasonable for all concerned, that's all I'm asking.
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Old 06-07-2010, 09:53 PM
 
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The best non medical treatment that I have found anywhere anytime is a 30 minute neck deep soak in a hot tub over 102 degrees. I can get that just about anywhere.
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