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Old 03-06-2009, 07:31 PM
 
66 posts, read 161,323 times
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When you had made your decision to retire, how long did you wait to tell your boss and what were the reasons for waiting or not waiting?

I have made the decision to retire on July 1st(I teach) but I am still not 100% positive. Being single I don't want to jinx myself plus I have elderly parents living with me and could need to take leave if they needed me. But the closer I get to June the more sure I am. I haven't signed any paperwork yet.
I'm still waiting. Plus the powers above could make my last few months much more stressful than it is now.
So I have to decide whether to tell before or after I sign on the dotted line.
What did you do?
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Old 03-07-2009, 12:10 AM
 
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I would say anyhting until your sure first of all. Then you ned to start becoming evry familar with your plan which should be in the school districts handbook.
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Old 03-07-2009, 02:01 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW / CO / SA TX / Thailand
11,207 posts, read 18,690,859 times
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Find out your minimum legal notification period (But not discussing with your boss).
Then let the boss (and their boss) know with written and dated notification a couple days or a week before deadline. If they give you any trouble just tell them it was a difficult decision that you didn't take lightly and needed to fully explore options.

It is best to not burn bridges, but keep an element of control.

It was good for me just to 'step-out-the-back-door' after 32 yrs. No lunch, no cake, no goodbyes. Leave the badge, business credit cards, laptop, phone, pencils, erasers. Don't look back.
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Old 03-07-2009, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Central Maine
4,056 posts, read 3,247,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janb View Post
Find out your minimum legal notification period (But not discussing with your boss).
Then let the boss (and their boss) know with written and dated notification a couple days or a week before deadline. If they give you any trouble just tell them it was a difficult decision that you didn't take lightly and needed to fully explore options.

It is best to not burn bridges, but keep an element of control.
I agree. You need to comply with any stated minimum notification period, so that the powers-that-be can plan for your replacement (if they can afford to do so, that is), and add a few days for good measure. For me, well, I let my boss know more than a year in advance. She wanted to send me to a bunch of fairly expensive training, and I told her to send a co-worker instead - that she would see a return on the investment with the co-worker but not with me, since I was retiring.

But in your case, since you say that they would make your situation even more stressful knowing that you are retiring, I wouldn't exceed the minimum notification period by too much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by janb View Post
It was good for me just to 'step-out-the-back-door' after 32 yrs. No lunch, no cake, no goodbyes. Leave the badge, business credit cards, laptop, phone, pencils, erasers. Don't look back.
After 34 years, I did very much the same thing. No big retirement party with cake and all that. My closest co-workers and my immediate supervisor took me to lunch, and that was a lot of fun. But that was all I wanted, and they respected my wishes.
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
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I told my boss last year that I was seriously considering retiring this year. At my job, there are quite a few people at management level (myself included) who are at or near retirement age, and if everyone who is eligible were to go at once it would create a serious "brain drain" on the agency. After working there for 30 plus years, I care enough to want things to go as smoothly as possible going forward. I also like and respect my co-workers, and do not want to leave them in the lurch.

I figured they would want to plan pro-actively. The problem is, I don't think anyone believed me. Whether just being in denial, or thinking I was just after attention (?) - who knows, because when I gave official notice in writing a few weeks ago that my effective retirement date is May1st, it was met with total shock. I was even approached about a possible promotion if I would stay. I said thanks but no thanks. Now they are scurrying around trying to plug holes, as several other people at my level and above are also leaving.

And I am in agreement about no party, and no big to-do when I go. I just want to fade into oblivion.
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Old 03-07-2009, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
22,805 posts, read 17,746,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janb View Post
Find out your minimum legal notification period (But not discussing with your boss).
Good advice.
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Old 03-07-2009, 11:41 AM
 
66 posts, read 161,323 times
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Thanks, everyone! I have until July 15th to sign paperwork but I need to do it before July 1st to get next year's July COLA.
I also want to slip quietly out the back door and never look back. Janb, I'm right with you.
With teaching, the principal has all summer to find a replacement so my co-workers won't be in the lurch as I will fulfill all my duties before I leave. It's sad that there is no 'training' of the new teacher by the retiring teacher. You're plopped in the classroom and you sink or swim.
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Old 03-07-2009, 02:56 PM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 8,707,546 times
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I'm not required to give the boss any notice at all. If I want, I could file my papers with personnel, walk out the door and never come back. Personnel is not allowed to tell the management. It's been done. Some people even had the boss start awol action only to find out they could do nothing as the employee was retired.

But I already told my boss when I plan to go and he is planning to go 2 months before me.
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 17,965,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janb View Post
Find out your minimum legal notification period (But not discussing with your boss).
Then let the boss (and their boss) know with written and dated notification a couple days or a week before deadline.
Very sound advice for people working in a large company. If you work in a small company (and you get along well with your employer) then IMO you can feel a little more relaxed about discussing the matter. With all the layoffs, etc. going on you have to be extra careful about letting your boss know that you're thinking about retirement (or any other career changes). Sad, but true.
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Old 03-07-2009, 08:36 PM
 
16,310 posts, read 14,605,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janb View Post
Find out your minimum legal notification period (But not discussing with your boss).
It's not so much about the boss, but HR people, and how much time they need, to process your retirement, discuss your options on health coverage, 401k, your vacation sick leave balance.

If you boss is a decent guy and you expect he will treat you fairly, no harm in giving him a heads up. If not, then not.
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