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Old 03-23-2007, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
1,848 posts, read 6,250,881 times
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It's just starting to happen. Baby Boomers will be retiring by the millions within the next few years.

I am wondering if some cities or states will be minus a lot of population in the near future. Will there be lots of retired people moving south?

There is the work place issue as well. With millions retiring will we have enough workers?

What is your vision of the USA in about 10 or 15 years?
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Old 03-23-2007, 12:58 AM
 
Location: WPB, FL. Dreaming of Oil city, PA
2,909 posts, read 12,993,275 times
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I can see alot of halfbacks because thats where the best weather is and costs of living is lower. Florida is popular but not affordable to many retirees so they are choosing Texas, Georgia, Tennessee, Carolinas instead.
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Old 03-23-2007, 03:42 AM
 
Location: Woodland Park
188 posts, read 854,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterlily View Post
It's just starting to happen. Baby Boomers will be retiring by the millions within the next few years.

I am wondering if some cities or states will be minus a lot of population in the near future. Will there be lots of retired people moving south?

There is the work place issue as well. With millions retiring will we have enough workers?

What is your vision of the USA in about 10 or 15 years?
I'm a nurse who can't wait to retire! Will be doing so within a few years, hopefully. I think the nursing shortage will be getting worse as we retire and there will be some major work place issues there. Most of us in my age group are getting tired of all the extra things that are being required of us these days and the increasing frustration of trying to meet everyone's expectations.
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Old 03-23-2007, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
3,359 posts, read 10,916,074 times
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This is something I could think on for a long time and still not foresee the full scope of.

Yes, there will be plenty of workers and the reason is that we will increase immigration susbtantially. People will come from all over the world, many places that we haven't seen much immigration from and others who will increase their presence here. This will fundamentally change our nation both in good ways and bad. We will become much more of an international nation.

As for population movement I think small towns will retain more seniors than younger people as jobs seem to be congregating to urban areas. Cities will become bigger and more diverse. Some seniors will move to the city for the convenience of not having to drive and others will stay put. Public transportation will increasingly be put into place and be used. Optional travel will be curtailed due to fuel costs and road congestion hassles. More young families will move to halfback states than seniors as that's where more jobs are being created, and company headquarters will move off-shore for tax reasons. Younger workers will increasingly find themselves being transferred all over the world. Some young people will decide to drop out and live independently in the country self-sufficiently.

There will be more intergenerational living as the cut needed to pay for ever long lived seniors will made the possibility of owning a home out of reach for most younger families. Pensions will go by the wayside, even govt ones will come under threat. Social security will be changed so that only the poor will receive it. Families living together will be encouraged to keep their old people home for care and nursing homes will only be for those who are near death. Husbands and wives will find themselves working opposite shifts in order to care for children and elders who will take up more of the work at home.

There will be great strides in medicine and cures that will be much less invasive. Oriental medicine and fitness routines will gain greater acceptance especially for seniors. Wars will be different in that many countries will have ultimate destructive capability thus keeping everyone in a state of nervous stasis. Instead terrorism on large and small scale will be le guerre du jour. Food capacity worldwide and fresh water will come under pressure and we'll see more hydroponic farming even taking place in urban factories. Fishing will be become banned around most of the world to be replaced by planned aquatic farms.
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Old 03-23-2007, 08:06 AM
 
1,025 posts, read 3,766,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janetjanetbobanet View Post
I'm a nurse who can't wait to retire! Will be doing so within a few years, hopefully. I think the nursing shortage will be getting worse as we retire and there will be some major work place issues there. Most of us in my age group are getting tired of all the extra things that are being required of us these days and the increasing frustration of trying to meet everyone's expectations.
English-speaking nurses from India are being recruited for Atlanta now (probably elsewhere in the country as well).
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Old 03-24-2007, 02:55 AM
 
Location: Woodland Park
188 posts, read 854,848 times
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Originally Posted by Figment 07 View Post
English-speaking nurses from India are being recruited for Atlanta now (probably elsewhere in the country as well).
And the Phillipines, and other places, probably a good thing, too.
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Old 03-24-2007, 03:47 PM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 34,075,539 times
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Are the nurses who are educated in those other countries required to go as long or to learn as much as they are in the U.S.?

Wow, Sgoldie has such a good and well thought out post that I can't think of anything else to add that would be important. I do believe that the southern half of the U.S. will have a continued population growth cause it's rough up North in the cold if you're aging.
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Old 03-24-2007, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
1,848 posts, read 6,250,881 times
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I imagine that some new retirement spots will become popular. They'll probably be places that we that are pretty unknown spots now.

I don't see an end to social security. They may need to drop the amount to a % of what people recieve. They can't leave millions of people with no income.

Older people will travel more. There will be more active retirement communities. The job force will shrink and the population of the U.S. will stop growing.

That's my vision anyway. I look forward to a happy retirement.
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Old 03-27-2007, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Woodland Park
188 posts, read 854,848 times
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[quote=Jammie;492502]Are the nurses who are educated in those other countries required to go as long or to learn as much as they are in the U.S.?

I would guess so. Nurses from other countries, at least the ones I have worked with, tend to be pretty good ones, with a good work ethic. It will be good for us as a country if they do come here.
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Old 03-28-2007, 02:56 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
239 posts, read 1,186,889 times
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I am a baby boomer who retired very early and my husband, who is now semi-retired is, by definition, one year shy (or actually, one MONTH shy) of being of the baby-boomer generation (born in '45 not '46). We're still contributing to the tax base and the economy in general, but our day is nearing when we will no longer have an employment-generated income.

It is predicted that the retiring baby boomers will strain the U.S. economy severely but to what extent cannot be known right now, during our current 'precarious' economic situation. Much depends on the health of our economy in years to come and let's face it, with the deficit now at $8.8-trillion and growing by the minute, the imbalance in trade, global threats of natural and unnatural proportion, well.... things look pretty scarey. I'm not a pessimist but it's hard to see the rainbow beyond the current stormy skies right now.

Part of the worry about the economic impact the boomer retirees may have is the fact that so many of us are healthy and will likely live a lot longer than previous generations. Thus, we're more likely to spend our retirement savings before we pass on, and many of us will have to go on the 'public dole' at some point. Health care costs are a huge concern for anyone of any age. We have to do something to fix our health care problems.

I sure hope, Waterlily, that you are correct about Social Security. My husband and I figure we'll get our share, or at least some of it, but I do worry for future generations. Social Security is really a good and necessary program that has helped millions of senior citizens who otherwise would have been completely destitute and out on the street. The 'powers-that-be', i.e., corporate interests, are playing every trick they can on the public in an attempt to privatize it. Fortunately for our country, Bush made a mess of carrying the corporate message to the people but there will be others, in years to come, who will harp on this same thing and no doubt, far more eloquently than Bush was capable of doing (that goes without saying, doesn't it? ). I hope the working public does not fall for it. It would be the worse thing for our country--to do away with Social Security.

We boomers did our best to try to make this a better world and country, I believe, but we weren't infallible, apparently. In retrospect, there were a lot of things we might have done a lot better.

If we can somehow dig ourselves out of the mess we are currently in and not create any future ones, then the USA will be fine with a smaller work force and more retirees. My gut feeling is---and please don't condemn me for saying this---but I feel we need to become more democratically socialistic in our approach to government, and put an end to the corporate capitalistic ideals that are causing a painfully imbalanced socioeconomic demographic. If we continue to let corporate interests run amok, unchecked and unchallenged, the working middle class will soon be tethered to unrepayable debt, and another era of 'serfdom' will return.

But again, I'm not a pessimist. That rainbow is there, somewhere. (And NO! I'm not on acid! )
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