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Old 02-18-2009, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,686 posts, read 33,686,426 times
Reputation: 51883

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesaje View Post
The more often this sort of thing happens, the more inevitable national health care becomes.
If it is rationed for older Americans, as Tom Daschle proposed in his book, they can do you know what with the inevitability. In the UK, a board approves/rejects treatments using a formula that divides the cost of the treatment by the number of years the patient is likely to benefit (in other words, how long they are likely to live). Treatments are more apt to be approved for younger than older patients. If that's the board they are modeling The Federal Council "cost-effectiveness" on, and why else would they suggest Daschle to head it before he had to bow out, then we older folks are in trouble.
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Old 02-19-2009, 12:46 PM
 
Location: North Alabama
767 posts, read 1,846,859 times
Reputation: 725
I retired at age 48 in 1997. Civil Service, health insurance in hand. My favorite comment in the early years of my retirement was "You know, retirement is just vastly under-rated." Now, when folks want to know what I'm "doing these days", my reply is usually just "I stay home and take care of my dog."

The only thing I've missed is the paycheck. I took a 14 percent reduction in pension to retire early, but --like many others here--felt life was too short to take a chance on my employer unilaterally changing the retirement we had been promised when we signed up. Fortunately, I married well both times and my current spouse (who has failed retirement three times now) has taken up the slack nicely. There were too many outside activities calling for my attention to wait much longer, and I believe any of us can probably find some kind of part-time job somewhere if the money ever gets just too short when we're older. If I've gotten too sick to work by that time, then my spouse knows to just divorce me and let me go on Medicaid if need be. Live your (real) life while you have the health to enjoy it! And don't spend a second worrying about those who are envious of your situation or your decision.
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Old 02-19-2009, 03:10 PM
 
20,903 posts, read 39,179,200 times
Reputation: 19188
Feel guilty? Are you crazy? I've worked from my senior year in HS, wife worked from her HS graduation. Planned our retirement from before we got married in 1974. Knew that neither of us wanted kids, so we are child free by choice. Both of us worked full time for 35 years. Saved and invested. Bought a home early and banked the pay raises over the years. Retired at age 55 with NO debt of any kind. Wife retired at 52 on an "early out" offer. No guilt at all.

No extravagant life style. No drugs. No lovers on the side. No boats; if I want to go fishing or boating, I'll go on a day-charter or rent a boat. No fancy cars; they EAT money. No pets or horses; they are as costly as kids, or more. Well dressed and well fed, but nothing extravagant, no Gucci, no Prada. Hart-Marx and Bill Blass suits were plenty fine enough for me. Took cruises. Took trips. Collected things we liked.

For damned sure no RV's that are one of the worst investments ever; if I want one I'll rent one, but would rather stay in a nice hotel - with room service, an exercise room, pool, free breakfast - why would I want to drive one of those RV's, much less own one. Sure, some folks spend their free time in the woods, maybe an RV fits that, still, that's an awful lump to pay for. The storage yards are FULL of the things, most of the year. Think twice about letting your "pride of ownership" (EGO!) take you down the road to debt debt debt.

No reason to be guilty unless you commit some sort of crime. No crime in doing your planning EARLY and sticking it to it.

There's nothing noble about working to the day you die, especially if you're broke and HAVE to work. If you are fortunate enough to do something you love doing, then do it as long as you enjoy it, however old you get.

I'm 61, retired 6 years ago. Every evening is Friday night. Every sun-up is Saturday morning. Every bottle of wine has my name on it.
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Old 02-19-2009, 03:23 PM
 
2,317 posts, read 4,639,192 times
Reputation: 1248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Feel guilty? Are you crazy? I've worked from my senior year in HS, wife worked from her HS graduation. Planned our retirement from before we got married in 1974. Knew that neither of us wanted kids, so we are child free by choice. Both of us worked full time for 35 years. Saved and invested. Bought a home early and banked the pay raises over the years. Retired at age 55 with NO debt of any kind. Wife retired at 52 on an "early out" offer. No guilt at all.

No extravagant life style. No drugs. No lovers on the side. No boats; if I want to go fishing or boating, I'll go on a day-charter or rent a boat. No fancy cars; they EAT money. No pets or horses; they are as costly as kids, or more. Well dressed and well fed, but nothing extravagant, no Gucci, no Prada. Hart-Marx and Bill Blass suits were plenty fine enough for me. Took cruises. Took trips. Collected things we liked.

For damned sure no RV's that are one of the worst investments ever; if I want one I'll rent one, but would rather stay in a nice hotel - with room service, an exercise room, pool, free breakfast - why would I want to drive one of those RV's, much less own one. Sure, some folks spend their free time in the woods, maybe an RV fits that, still, that's an awful lump to pay for. The storage yards are FULL of the things, most of the year. Think twice about letting your "pride of ownership" (EGO!) take you down the road to debt debt debt.

No reason to be guilty unless you commit some sort of crime. No crime in doing your planning EARLY and sticking it to it.

There's nothing noble about working to the day you die, especially if you're broke and HAVE to work. If you are fortunate enough to do something you love doing, then do it as long as you enjoy it, however old you get.

I'm 61, retired 6 years ago. Every evening is Friday night. Every sun-up is Saturday morning. Every bottle of wine has my name on it.
this is such a great post mike..I basically did the same..worked fro many years..had a plan and goal...love the last quote..especially about the wine...
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Old 02-19-2009, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,680 posts, read 49,443,611 times
Reputation: 19129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
... Every evening is Friday night. Every sun-up is Saturday morning. Every bottle of wine has my name on it.
LOL

Great post, all of it!

I really like this part!

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Old 02-20-2009, 10:06 AM
 
20,903 posts, read 39,179,200 times
Reputation: 19188
Thanks BeeKeeper....

When someone tells me to have a great day, I often say "any day you wake up is a GREAT day!

s/Mike
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Old 05-18-2009, 11:38 PM
 
133 posts, read 265,578 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjj View Post
Retired 2 years ago at age 50 and loving it. When people ask if it was a big adjustment for me I reply ..Yes, it was a difficult adjustment. But after 5 minutes I was just fine!!!
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Old 05-19-2009, 12:46 AM
 
133 posts, read 265,578 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Feel guilty? Are you crazy? I've worked from my senior year in HS, wife worked from her HS graduation. Planned our retirement from before we got married in 1974. Knew that neither of us wanted kids, so we are child free by choice. Both of us worked full time for 35 years. Saved and invested. Bought a home early and banked the pay raises over the years. Retired at age 55 with NO debt of any kind. Wife retired at 52 on an "early out" offer. No guilt at all.

No extravagant life style. No drugs. No lovers on the side. No boats; if I want to go fishing or boating, I'll go on a day-charter or rent a boat. No fancy cars; they EAT money. No pets or horses; they are as costly as kids, or more. Well dressed and well fed, but nothing extravagant, no Gucci, no Prada. Hart-Marx and Bill Blass suits were plenty fine enough for me. Took cruises. Took trips. Collected things we liked.

For damned sure no RV's that are one of the worst investments ever; if I want one I'll rent one, but would rather stay in a nice hotel - with room service, an exercise room, pool, free breakfast - why would I want to drive one of those RV's, much less own one. Sure, some folks spend their free time in the woods, maybe an RV fits that, still, that's an awful lump to pay for. The storage yards are FULL of the things, most of the year. Think twice about letting your "pride of ownership" (EGO!) take you down the road to debt debt debt.

No reason to be guilty unless you commit some sort of crime. No crime in doing your planning EARLY and sticking it to it.

There's nothing noble about working to the day you die, especially if you're broke and HAVE to work. If you are fortunate enough to do something you love doing, then do it as long as you enjoy it, however old you get.

I'm 61, retired 6 years ago. Every evening is Friday night. Every sun-up is Saturday morning. Every bottle of wine has my name on it.

Great post!
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Old 05-19-2009, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,686 posts, read 33,686,426 times
Reputation: 51883
One thing you should consider, when you retire early, is the age of the other retirees in your daytime groups and everything that goes along with that.

You know, if it's a physical activity, age probably won't matter because particpation is based on being able to do the activity, not how old you are. For example, I know some 70 and 80 year olds that can handle heat and walking long distances better than I can at 57. If the activity is a July hike in the woods only those who can do it will be there regardless of age. You'll be equal participants.

But, if you are involved in non-physical activities, and you are the minority 50 something in a sea of 70 - 75 year olds, you might want to consider how that will play out for you from a mindset perspective just like a 20 year old hanging around with a bunch of 40 - 45 year olds would have to consider it. What do you have in common with them and will it be harder to make friends when the pool of 50 year olds with free time, in the daytime, will be so much smaller? Just something to consider.
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Old 05-19-2009, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Central Maine
4,687 posts, read 5,536,529 times
Reputation: 4966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
I'm 61, retired 6 years ago. Every evening is Friday night. Every sun-up is Saturday morning. Every bottle of wine has my name on it.
I'm right behind you, Mike - I retired last year at age 55, having planned to do just that since age 21. It took some work and some planning (especially since we have kids), but both my wife and I retired at 55, and we are lovin' life!

We no longer look forward to Friday afternoon, nor do we dread Monday morning. Every day is a good day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
No reason to be guilty unless you commit some sort of crime. No crime in doing your planning EARLY and sticking it to it.
Well said!
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