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Old 05-22-2010, 01:23 PM
'M'
 
Location: Glendale Country Club
1,818 posts, read 2,614,375 times
Reputation: 2546

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This month I received my first SS check <yippee> at age 62 <uh-oh>...I'm categorizing myself forever now that I mentioned my age I work 3 days a week at a job that I like and pays not terribly well, with no bennies, but that is OK. I am worn out from the past 8 years - stress galore - and working 5 days/week just isn't something I have the stamina for any longer. So...early SS was the way to go for me. If you'd asked me 10 years ago whether I'd collect early SS, I'd have thought you were crazy <eek> Early SS made complete sense in my situation. I still have Fri-Sat-Sun-Mon to do something I haven't had time to do in years...be involved in community activities and PLAY!!
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Old 05-22-2010, 01:33 PM
'M'
 
Location: Glendale Country Club
1,818 posts, read 2,614,375 times
Reputation: 2546
[quote=windflower;488428]This question is for anyone else who retired before age 60.

Quote:
All of my friends, family and acquaintances are, however, still working full-time. I am the only one who has retired and at every social gathering someone ALWAYS asks the dreaded question: "So, what are you DOING with yourself nowadays? Are you WORKING?" in the tone of voice that implies rather "Are you still being a layabout, or have you decided to return to doing something productive?" During the years I was restoring the house, I at least had that "excuse", but it is now finished. I get the unmistakable sense that people feel there is no earthly reason why a healthy single childless 58-year-old woman of education and reasonable intelligence should not be still in the workforce… other than sheer laziness or irresponsibility, that is, neither of which has ever been the case. I have sometimes felt guilty enough to actually lie and say that I am doing temporary-employment work! That always results in a response of "Oh really? That's very nice" and the conversation turns elsewhere; but if I instead evade the question by answering "Oh, this and that", it continues on into more of a third-degree investigation: "But what exactly do you DO with all that free time?" There are times when I am tempted to reply "None of your bloody business" but of course I never do
Isn't it amazing that people think because someone isn't working, they aren't a contributing member of society? Many fields are extremely stressful. By the time we're 50-60 - or younger, it's time to be useful in ways other than working 40 hours, even if your chosen career is one that is useful for others like teaching, the medical profession and many others.

When we near retirement age, our bodies slow down and can't do what we did when we were much younger. It's difficult to understand this until YOU are there and are experiencing memory loss and competing with 20-30-somethings who are more advanced than you ever were at their age, aging body, and also, a desire to put time and energy into yourself, your grandkids, society, volunteer work - and yes, did I say volunteer work whatever gives your pleasure and satisfaction.

Our talents now lie in other areas...which perhaps the current culture doesn't value...but we know what is right for us. There is nothing in this world that can compare to doing volunteer work in your chosen areas.

This isn't necessarily a bad thing...this is how we humans were made...we slow down as we age and other things become important. I'm glad to be where I am today...semi-retired and loving every minute. There is much that I am looking forward to exploring...whoopee!!
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Old 03-17-2011, 10:15 AM
 
2 posts, read 3,257 times
Reputation: 15
I plan on retiring the end of this year. I'm 45 and my husband is 50. We have run our own business for years and now are looking forward to not fielding 1:00 am emergency calls, govt. regulations or needing to be up by 5:00. Our youngest will graduate high school next year and then move on to college. I don't know how I'll handle not working-I've been working full time since I was 16. I am, however, looking forward to finding out. My plans include getting back into glass working, painting and all those things I have not had the time or energy to pursue in the past. My husband has several old trucks to restore. As far as people wondering what we'll do with our time, that is just jealousy, we worked hard to be in this position and I plan on enjoying myself.
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Old 03-17-2011, 10:31 AM
 
2 posts, read 3,257 times
Reputation: 15
There is nothing wrong with retiring at 32. You have a business that not only keeps you funded but supports your local economy.
I agree with another post I read here.
roughly(working when you don't have to is keeping someone else from having a job they need.)

I am a business owner, soon I'll be free to retire. I'm 45 and I plan on being retired by my 46th birthday. I am not feeling guilty. I've done my part-now it's time to play.
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Old 03-17-2011, 11:50 AM
 
20,905 posts, read 39,184,055 times
Reputation: 19193
Artful, agree all the way. Before we even got married, we planned our future with an eye to a safe retirement at the earliest, and we did it. We've no regrets and suggest that everyone do their planning, early, and stick to it.

Sounds like you were in the plumbing or tow truck business....
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Old 03-17-2011, 01:44 PM
 
819 posts, read 1,363,460 times
Reputation: 1405
Why would anyone feel guilty about drawing SS early. I retired 10 years ago, have been receiving a SS check for 3 years and just got my Medicare card, effective July 1. We are having a great retirement and should have the funds to carry us thru and then maybe a little something for the chilluns. At least they're guaranteed a paid for house and two paid for vehicles.
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Old 03-17-2011, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,449,101 times
Reputation: 19134
I can not imagine why anyone would feel 'guilty'.

I am not eligible for SS, but the second that I qualified for my pension I took it.

I will have been on retired on pension 23 years before I finally become eligible for SS.
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Old 03-17-2011, 09:55 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,922,814 times
Reputation: 18050
[quote='M';14290790]
Quote:
Originally Posted by windflower View Post
This question is for anyone else who retired before age 60.



Isn't it amazing that people think because someone isn't working, they aren't a contributing member of society? Many fields are extremely stressful. By the time we're 50-60 - or younger, it's time to be useful in ways other than working 40 hours, even if your chosen career is one that is useful for others like teaching, the medical profession and many others.

When we near retirement age, our bodies slow down and can't do what we did when we were much younger. It's difficult to understand this until YOU are there and are experiencing memory loss and competing with 20-30-somethings who are more advanced than you ever were at their age, aging body, and also, a desire to put time and energy into yourself, your grandkids, society, volunteer work - and yes, did I say volunteer work whatever gives your pleasure and satisfaction.

Our talents now lie in other areas...which perhaps the current culture doesn't value...but we know what is right for us. There is nothing in this world that can compare to doing volunteer work in your chosen areas.

This isn't necessarily a bad thing...this is how we humans were made...we slow down as we age and other things become important. I'm glad to be where I am today...semi-retired and loving every minute. There is much that I am looking forward to exploring...whoopee!!
That seems to be a perosnal relationship problem and likely they always picked on the poster as they are jerks from what was decribed.
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Old 03-18-2011, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Santaluz - San Diego, CA
4,485 posts, read 8,144,354 times
Reputation: 1976
Absolutely I do NOT feel guilty about early retirement. To be honest, I am still working and doing consulting and investments for a few clients but nothing like the 16-17 hour days I worked for the past many years. Having the ability of being able to retire earlier in life feels amazing and I don't feel guilty for it.

Most that can retire at a younger age did so due to extremely hard work or building companies and selling them. I worked insane amounts of hours while I was younger and now I feel fortunate that I get to spend so much time with my kids. We travel around and see the world together.

I'm not sure if I'll end up going back to a normal 9 to 5 job. I've gotten spoiled spending so much time with my young kids and plan to spend as much time as possible with them. Of course they will start school in a few years so I might go back to work. But for now, I feel like the luckiest guy in the world.

Last edited by earlyretirement; 09-04-2013 at 06:29 PM..
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Old 03-18-2011, 10:18 AM
 
88 posts, read 200,717 times
Reputation: 99
I stopped working way before I was even eligible for early retirement. I loved my job & always said that I would leave when I wanted to do something else.. It was boring to hear my co-workers complaining every day & some even passed away before they did retire. That scenario was not for me.

I have many interests & things that I really enjoy doing so I don't miss my job one bit & have no regrets because I gave it quite a bit of thought & ran the numbers before my final day there.

I do not feel quilty not working as I have enough savings plus a COLA pension. I am debt free with a paid off house which is a plus too. Therefore, I am totally enjoying the freedom & the lifestyle to do as I choose or not.
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