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Old 04-24-2007, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,189 posts, read 24,906,244 times
Reputation: 3840

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Some of the posts got me thinking, what are the different issues that come up for the single person retired or planning to retire vs. the issues couple's consider?

I know that if I had a partner, some of my choices might be different: perhaps more rural and less populated; possibly more socially challenging. But alone, I am trying to find a balance between what I most want and what is likely to satisfy me in the short and long run, knowing full well I'll be making compromises.

What are your thoughts?
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Old 04-24-2007, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
80 posts, read 435,837 times
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ontheroad-

You bring up a great question. From my experience, a couple's selection of a place to retire is much like any other decision they make (where to go to dinner, what movie to watch, where to take a vacation, etc.). They try to find a balance or blending of the two interests or where this is simply not possible, there may need to be some give and take. Let's say his main hobby is golf while she wants to be near the theater. There are many communities where this is possible. Now if he has an interest in the mountains and she wants the coast, in most areas of the country you'd simply have to pick one over the other. Chances are if they've been married for any length of time, they've worked out their approach to how to handle these questions. They may have different sets of friends based on their individual activities and interests, but they also have mutual friends that they enjoy dinner or other outings with.

A single person does not have these same factors of restriction or compromise. They make these decisions as an individual. Now, they may have competing interests within what they want (for example, their son lives in Indianapolis, but they want to be near the ocean too- one of these has to give), but they don't have to take a spouse's vantage point into consideration. What they may need, however, is a built in social structure or opportunities for involvement, particularly when making a move to a new area- clubs, volunteering, tennis league, scheduled activities at the recreation center, etc. When making a selection of a retirement community, it is certainly a pertinent question to ask about what life is like for singles in the area.
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Old 04-24-2007, 04:15 PM
 
60 posts, read 87,998 times
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I'm part of a couple and I'd like to retire somewhere near a big city (not too close) for all the amenities, i.e., arts, restaurants, hospitals, etc., and I'd like to be somewhere where there is a mix of ages but I don't want to be on the end of the curve, and I'd like to be somewhere that, if I should become a single, I could easily get around and survive as a single.
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Old 04-24-2007, 09:19 PM
 
942 posts, read 1,066,069 times
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Whenever I research the North Carolina posts on here, or read retirement information on there, it is obvious it is geared towards families and spouses. It seems like the most family oriented state out of all the retirement ones. That is fine for families and couples, but for a single it may become a cross off the list of possible choices list.
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Old 04-24-2007, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,884 posts, read 25,306,858 times
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I always thought wherever you choose for retirement has to be doable for both individuals as well as the couple. It's just a fact that someone goes first and the one that's still here has to survive. What that meant for me is a more urban location and no huge acreages that require lawn tractors etc.
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Old 04-25-2007, 06:26 AM
 
Location: new orleans
182 posts, read 751,805 times
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In a way, I'm finding its harder to make a decision because I have no other person to bounce ideas off of. Too many possibilities? too much freedom?? after all its just Me in the end. With a partner I'd have to limit or outright reject some choices ..... Friends help but only so far. I have friends here in Fl. that want me to stay which is nice but then I have friends and family in New Orleans , my home town and and then there's my daughter in Connecticut.... I sometimes think I'd like someone to just say: do this!! and be done with it

In the end ( as I posted somewhere on one of these forums) I have to decide what is best for me: what I can give up, what I can't and, silly as it sounds, I'm having a bit of trouble just determining what all that is. I'd like to make this move the "final" one, with the intent of staying put as opposed to thinking it'll just be for 2-3 years.... but I may have to revise that as well. Maybe i was meant to wander, not stay put. Its just moving is SUCH a hassle!!
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Old 04-25-2007, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,189 posts, read 24,906,244 times
Reputation: 3840
Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

I do think we all have more than one choice whether we are single or in a couplea relationship.

However, as I am in the former, I suppose I see some of the issues the way OREGONRAIN sees them: fewer apparent references to a life as a single retiree, and face the same situation stormweary mentions, deciding on one's own can be daunting--at times.

I do hope we all find what it is we are looking for and without paying an enormous psychological or financial price.

And, I certainly hope more folks join us in a discussion--it can only help!
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Old 04-25-2007, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
80 posts, read 435,837 times
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Because of this thread I was doing some additional reading on retirement options for singles. In Jan Cullinane's book, The New Retirement (which I highly recommend), she lists the following "suggestions for places particularly amenable to singles":

Asheville, North Carolina
Las Vegas, Nevada
Naples, Florida
Sarasota, Florida
Surprise, Arizona

Please let me know if you have any questions.
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Old 04-25-2007, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,189 posts, read 24,906,244 times
Reputation: 3840
Thanks for the suggestions. I am familiar with Asheville (NC) and to some extent Sarasota (FL), none of the others.

I think it would be interesting to know "why" these places would be good for single retirees. I don't feel at all attracted to any!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayDaughtry View Post
Because of this thread I was doing some additional reading on retirement options for singles. In Jan Cullinane's book, The New Retirement (which I highly recommend), she lists the following "suggestions for places particularly amenable to singles":

Asheville, North Carolina
Las Vegas, Nevada
Naples, Florida
Sarasota, Florida
Surprise, Arizona

Please let me know if you have any questions.
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Old 04-25-2007, 12:36 PM
 
942 posts, read 1,066,069 times
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I have been to everyone of these places except Surprise, but I have been to Arizona, a number of times and lived there for 1 year when I was in the Air Force. Asheville, has some of the same type of population that Portland has, hippie type and New Age holistic medicine type people, people that like to live life by looking in crystal balls, or find it is cheaper to live in a bush rather than get a job and find a apt. Naples and Sarasota, very nice areas, extremely expensive, I think these 2 areas are not going to attract many except the affluent types and wealthy snowbirds. Las Vegas fun to visit, but to live I don't know, Not the most homey atmosphere and so very transient. but too each his own, Im sure many find these places appealing, and Im glad these spots are for someone. Oh yes, Surprise AZ don't know about that one, but as far as Arizona, I think it may be loosing its luster with people also, Phoenix has severe growth problems and Tucson is struggling with very high crime for such a small city.
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